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INFPs don't seem to be the most materialistic type, but on the other hand we aren't the most organized type. I track finances in my INFP-ENFJ household, although I'm no Scrooge McDuck when it comes to saving. How about you?
 

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I'm terrible with money. I always have been.

I have a decent retirement account started but that's because I basically have no choice...thank god!

I used to be married to an INFJ though and, somehow, she was even worse (way worse). Explain that?
 

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I'm awful with money...and numbers! I'm way too spontaneous with my spendings (I can't resist neat, useless stuff and I'm a sucker anything organic, healthy and whatnot), and simultaneously I've only very rarely had a good, decent income. I've had some years with no income at all, due to mental issues, and then I've had some years of governmental paid income, the result being that I've chronically had no money, credit and spend more than I have. I don't really spend that much in everyday life, but I do buy quite a few books (but mostly secondhand!) and when I want something really badly I do tend to give no regards to money, such as wanting to go to some event, have that book etc on that day, or a bit of travelling (though never anything major), and when I get my obsessions I can't help but wanting to attain some of all the related merchandise etc.

I guess am quite sporadic with my money spending/saving sense, I'll hunt savings and refuse to buy products I find too expensive (and that's a whole lot of stuff living in Denmark, it may be because I'm too well aware of the contrasting cost of a lot these things in the UK, USA or Germany), spend a lot of time finding the cheapest version, but then I'll suddenly blow a lot of money on something obsession-related... or recently, my dog!

I'm certainly never gonna be rich, or have a healthy economy, I really don't understand how people do that :S
 

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I have always lived within my means and generally put away an ok amount of money on savings. But I never track what I spend really. However, buying a house and having a kid is slowly making me pay more attention.
 

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I'm pretty all right. I have a super laissez-faire way of keeping track of finances but I definitely tighten up on spending when I am feeling insecure and I loosen up when I am feeling more secure. I am not rolling in it but have never found myself having major problems either. I don't care enough to be super stressed or organized about it but I like my financial freedom enough to be conscientious. I do want to be my family breadwinner someday, which might be weird for an INFP, but it would make me super proud.
 

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I'm pretty good with money. I don't have any problems with budgeting, spending or saving, and I am teaching myself more and more about investing so that I can make good choices about what to do with the money I save. This is definitely an INFP stereotype that doesn't fit me.

Even when I was super poor for a period of time I managed to make a decent dent in my student loans and save up a small amount of money. Honestly, I don't know how I did it because I was well below the poverty line, living on my own and didn't have any help.

I can be a penny pincher if I set my mind to it and it's for a purpose. It's also true that I can spend without a second thought, though that hasn't happened very often in my life.

Second thoughts: My INFP-ness probably comes out in how I manage my finances. I suspect it's more than a little convoluted and lacking obvious efficiencies, but it still works.
 

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When I was young (18-30 for this example) I was status conscious. I grew up in a well to do area which made me associate a certain look with success. I dressed well, had a nice german sedan and ate out often. As it turned out those were my best earning years, before my spinal issues got the best of me. I was also extremely stressed out, kinda like a fish out of water. In my town there were lots of executives I tried to emulate. Eventually the stress caught up to me and made life too difficult for me to handle.

I drank a lot of beer (imported of course), was on several prescriptions in an attempt to make my personality (which I was unaware of) fit into the world I was in. I had a mental breakdown right after my 28th birthday. After which, I reassessed my life, sought treatment for alcoholism and drug dependency. (Benzos, opiates, and alcohol.) I learned enough about my personality traits in treatment and recovery over the next 2 years to come to understand living in that world would never work for me. Did you know wealthy executives, Drs. and entrepreneurs are rarely INFP? A few healthy types do well, especially if they're highly intelligent.

To get back on subject, I spent money like it was water! (Until I was about 25.) I sold real estate which was surely a better fit for me. (Than Dr. or Executive) I earned two huge commissions about 1 1/2 years apart, during a stint as a Commercial real estate agent. (2 apartment buildings) I thought my success would continue, and build, so I bought a condo, a new Mercedes, then an Audi, then another Mercedes, a BMW, then another Audi, lots of nice clothes, winter vacations to sunnier climes, etc.

Then anxiety, drinking and prescription drugs (which helped me at first) conspired to make life so difficult for me, that I collapsed in despair the year I was 28. Basically a nervous breakdown, I guess. My net $worth was $0, minus $13,400 or so, for treatment. That shocked me into better money management. I slowly began to be more genuine. Two years later I sold my condo, bought an affordably priced, slightly used domestic sedan and moved to Utah.

I resumed (my barely started) college education. So I spent about 6 years being a poor student. I discovered I could not handle the stress of working for barely over minimum wage, so I began taking 1 to 4 quarters off at a time to earn money. Seattle, Tucson, San Diego - anywhere but a rural college town in Utah. I purposely choose to look and act more working class, learned to budget, at times even down to the penny. Sometimes I didn't buy anything except food, tuition and books for months at a time. Sometimes in my early 20s I spent as much as $3000 per month on food (mostly eating out). Now I was surviving on $300-400 per 12 week quarter. (1990 dollars)

Eventually almost every vestige of materialism had disappeared. Sometimes I relapse a bit on snobbery, but usually catch myself. I somewhat jokingly laugh it off by apologetically throwing in; "I'm Sorry, I'm a recovering snob". I get the weirdest looks sometimes. I wonder why??

Anyway, now living below my means has become second nature. I buy almost everything I need at Costco, on sale somewhere, or used. Over the next several years all pretense of material success fell away.

I only have about 2 years worth of retirement savings. I won't take a stressful job anymore, and now I only indulge my pets. I lived in San Diego for several years, where I bought a house, just before housing prices skyrocketed. My house inflated enough to pay off my mortgage and have enough left to buy a house in Utah, but not San Diego (where I knew the housing bubble was almost ready to burst.) Having no mortgage or car payments is a really nice feeling.

I'm working towards finishing my degree in Psychology, then I will sit in my chair, smoke my pipe, and help fuck ups like myself to recover.

Now if I could only stop adopting stray cats.
 

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I've never been very good with money, especially during my early 20's. I've never made all that much money to begin with so it's not like I was living a very lavish lifestyle back then, but nowadays I keep an eye on how much I spend if I'm allocating my resources on things other than necessities.

In my younger years I didn't place much importance on money. Now that I'm a bit older and completely independent, I realize that how secure I feel in life is dependent on how much I have in my savings account. I also have daily fantasies of saving enough to one day pack up and leave for good.
 

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I only recently starting becoming responsible with my money. I grew up working class, was even homeless, but even still was spending everything that I had. It's only when I envisioned my future and the possibility to fully live my values did I become more fiscally responsible. I paid off my student loans and CC debt within a year and saved 1 year of living expenses (after I paid off the debt). It gives me great pleasure to be able take extended periods off work, or to donate to lot of causes, and being the position to do so 'cause I'm financially secure. I'm happy that I have the financial security to live my values and showcase a generous spirit. I do, however, still need to work on the generating income part. I definitely work below my skill level and what I should be getting paid. I need to believe in my value. As for the practical side of things, I had a ISTJ friend help me make the basic template in excel (and learn the formulas so I could customize it), developed a plan to get out of debt within a year, planned for non monthly expenses, and have a category for giving.
 

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I'm 17, all my money goes to food, thrift stores, drugs, CDs, and instrument stuff. I can never really save up for something if it takes too long to. Eventually I just end up scraping at the piggy bank saying I'll only take a little and I then repeat that until I have nothing. I think when it counts I'd be able to pull it together and spend more wisely. I'm going to be poor so I'd kind of have to, otherwise I'd positively be homeless.
 

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I just end up scraping at the piggy bank saying I'll only take a little and I then repeat that until I have nothing.
I can imagine you dropping the finger you use to flip off the world, toddling over to your piggy bank, peeking inside, scraping up money, then toddling over to your drug dealer's house. So adorable!
 

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I don't know how, but I somehow managed to be reasonably good with money. Both my parents are *terrible* with finances, so maybe I learned from them what not to do. I had a stint in my 20s (for, like, two days, really) where I decided I was going to go all out money conscious and keep a Quickbooks account and track everything to the penny. Well, that got boring very quickly. Now I use a system of percentage ranges and I've found that easy to stick to. I don't track my spending so long as it's always within a certain percentage range of my overall income. Same with savings and large purchases, housing, car, etc. I'm sure some things slip by, but I just keep an eye on the margins. I also hope I never get audited by the IRS as I never keep receipts :unsure:. I just use conservative estimates based on monthly averages.

I had a previous life experience similar to @Bleuhealer . I was making great money, living in a luxury bayside condo with an ocean view in Miami where I regularly saw professional basketball players that lived in the same building, went on weekend cruises to the Bahamas, etc. But I would stand in front of the floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the bay and think how none of it meant anything to me. I could literally lose everything in a fire tomorrow and I wouldn't care (except my cats).

Now at 33, I'm scrambling to pay down accounts for things I didn't need so I can go back to college for nursing and eventually work for charity medical organizations that likely pay very little. I've already made lots of money and it didn't mean anything, so who cares.
 

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I paid off my student loans about 20 years ago and started saving in retirement accounts. But I am really quite undisciplined about money. My spouse handles the details on a monthly basis but I do the taxes. We make big decisions together and inform each other about even small purchases. We are debt free except for our mortgage, which is a lot less than the value of our home. We have some money in retirement accounts but the last few years with me being ill and unemployed a lot has had us digging through most of our non-retirement savings. At 58 that has been a pretty significant hit. But I expect we'll be ok. In fact, now that I am gainfully employed again in a job that I love, I am encouraging her to quit if people keep fucking with her in her job. Money has never held any intrinsic value for me and I can do quite well with very little. I always seem to live within my means, whatever they may be.
 

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Money -- well, I wish I had more. I wouldn't mind being a millionaire. I do think husband and I do okay with the money we have. I don't really like paying bills so I just give him money and he pays all the bills. From the day I was married I insisted on separate bank accounts (my parents had this) but now that both of us are getting up there and could go to the hither regions at anytime, we have visited the banks to add our names to each account. Neither husband or myself want to be arrested for writing checks out of a dead person's account. Credit cards, I have a few, but last I checked my credit rating was really good. Surprisingly, I think I am able to make a little bit of money go a loooooong way. I think many would be surprised at what is coming into my home and how I can make it last. Self-preservation skills, I think.
 

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Very responsible.
There's 2 sides to this:

1. I rarely buy anything because I just don't desire much. Like... I don't know what to spend money on except necessities. Once a year I buy myself 1 item of eco-friendly clothing via etsy, and maybe one pair of eco-friendly earrings, and that's it. Treats I might buy are stuff that needs to be replaced, like a desk lamp that gets broken, or candles because obviously they get consumed, or a new journal because I fill the one I have, and pens because obviously ink gets used up...
I honestly have very few materialistic desires. I abslutely hate clothes shopping, it's a nightmare, so I avoid it. I don't wear any make-up, and I don't hang out with friends because I just don't enjoy restaurants or bars or anything... My expenses, then, are minimal by default because of my preferred & natural lifestyle.

2. I have a financial book and I write in it religiously. I love it! :D I love spending time with it and crunching numbers, and doodling on the margins with glittery gel pens. I know exactly how much I make, and know at all times how much my lifestyle costs (food, house, savings, etc), so I always know how much I can spend on treats. I never exceed that budget, and I've found that it's because I lack material desires that people around me do have. Not saying it's better or worse, but it's true that I'm less stressed than them cause I'm never in debt.

I've always been great with money. I had countless piggy banks and funny little trinket boxes that I used to put my money in when I was a kid. I would save up a lot because I never bought candy or clothes or anything. Then, I would spend my saved up money a year or two later in an experience, like going horse riding for a day or a similar activity.

imo Money is meant to help you enjoy life, and I refuse to amass vast amounts of money without a purpose, just because of fear. So I make sure to get myself fun experiences every once in a while, invest in life, u know. But nothing super expensive, maybe when I'm rich I will.
 
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Very responsible.
There's 2 sides to this:

1. I rarely buy anything because I just don't desire much. Like... I don't know what to spend money on except necessities. Once a year I buy myself 1 item of eco-friendly clothing via etsy, and maybe one pair of eco-friendly earrings, and that's it. Treats I might buy are stuff that needs to be replaced, like a desk lamp that gets broken, or candles because obviously they get consumed, or a new journal because I fill the one I have, and pens because obviously ink gets used up...
I honestly have very few materialistic desires. I abslutely hate clothes shopping, it's a nightmare, so I avoid it. I don't wear any make-up, and I don't hang out with friends because I just don't enjoy restaurants or bars or anything... My expenses, then, are minimal by default because of my preferred & natural lifestyle.

2. I have a financial book and I write in it religiously. I love it! :D I love spending time with it and crunching numbers, and doodling on the margins with glittery gel pens. I know exactly how much I make, and know at all times how much my lifestyle costs (food, house, savings, etc), so I always know how much I can spend on treats. I never exceed that budget, and I've found that it's because I lack material desires that people around me do have. Not saying it's better or worse, but it's true that I'm less stressed than them cause I'm never in debt.

I've always been great with money. I had countless piggy banks and funny little trinket boxes that I used to put my money in when I was a kid. I would save up a lot because I never bought candy or clothes or anything. Then, I would spend my saved up money a year or two later in an experience, like going horse riding for a day or a similar activity.

imo Money is meant to help you enjoy life, and I refuse to amass vast amounts of money without a purpose, just because of fear. So I make sure to get myself fun experiences every once in a while, invest in life, u know. But nothing super expensive, maybe when I'm rich I will.
I agree with your philosophy. Live frugally and you will have the money you need when you need it. I also can't see money as a goal but rather a means to an end.

I haven't seen you on here in awhile doing what you do best and that is sharing every part of yourself and inspiring the rest of us with your enthusiasm and ideas.
 
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I dunno, some people may say that I'm spending a lot of money, but the amount of money I spent on clothes within the past year was probably around $100-$150. My diet also usually consists of instant noodles. So maybe those things enable me to spend more money on things like school project materials.
 

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I'm decent. I'd say I can be really good if I focus.
Don't expect any banking skills from me but I know how to save and budget my money.

It's something of extreme importance now that I have to find, earn, conquer and reclaim every last bit of my finances in order to cross the Atlantic for good. I'm also currently living on my home in a hotel room that doesn't have many commodities so I'm forced to eat out a lot and many places are quite expensive though I've found solutions for that too that I'll start enforcing soon.

My issue with money is that I'm not a materialistic person who craves constant shopping but when I see something that hits me, something that conforms to my ideals, inspires my fantasies and tickles my essence, then I just need to have it. It's never just a single thing and choosing is hard, leaving my wallet skinnier. It doesn't happen too frequently and I'm not swayed by advertisement and peer pressure.

But I'm not a huge spender or a glutton for excess, too much excess overwhelms me if it's not something I want. It leaves me with a sense of shame and greed. I can go for months without buying anything that doesn't fall into my basic needs as long as my soul is fed by strong passion and my avoidance is keeping me locked in. I never give into fads unless it's something I personally find very appealing.

Another big one is being careless when it comes to the value of money and prices.

I'm paying more and more attention and choosing to go for things I might like less if that means I can save some money but I tend to be very absent minded, with vague plans and sometimes I simply adapt them to what inspires me and feels tempting rather than comparing prices (or I do and my favorite item still wins). I've noticed that in restaurants. I've noticed that with clothing. The more personal it gets, the hardest is to let my Te handle the situation.

I don't crave abundance and luxury, I just desire something that I can love and that represents me.
This is why being around Te-doms and planning together is very beneficial.
But I'm plenty organized my own way.

But I'm not a carefree Se type driven by immediate whims.
If I'm responsible for finances or I need to save money, I'll control myself.
With some occasional feelsy/nostalgic/fantasy fueling purchases.
 
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