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I'm very well compensated but I actually live like a poor person. Partly due to upbringing I try to save as much income as possible (I am sort of leaning towards FIRE but who knows, since I'm a lazy workaholic, if that makes sense). I pretty much catch any leftovers that coworkers are going to throw away (partly b/c my mom grew up dirt poor and I was punished as a kid for wasting food).
FIRE would be ideal for money saving and it makes sense for the future when we're old, but I don't know...it would just destroy momentary comfort, which is kind of nice to be able to experience. I'm like that too in a way. I try to not waste food, because that's how I grew up too. My mother is a war refugee that knew poverty, and taught us to appreciate what we have.

I'm actually earning more than my sister who's a physician with more years of training, so it's kinda fun to give her a hard time about it. That said, I put in a lot of off the clock hours because I'm pretty competitive and want to make my store the strongest store in the city... mine is a "Problem" store and historically it's been on the bad list (bottom performers) for years. I don't really have a life right now outside of work, so I'm at the stage of my life where I can do that, though, so your mileage may vary.

Last month we got in the top 10 stores in the area sooo... a total 180.
Congrats, your work paid off :)

The store i manage in particular has always been a puzzle for me to solve with high turnover and difficult patronage, and so to have ownership and treat it like my canvas and have a lot of creative freedom to operate how I see fit is really nice. I joke that I'm a very lazy person (which I am) but it is the lazy people that figure out the best ways of getting things done with the least amount of work. I am a proponent of working smarter, not harder.
YES. This is exactly how I view work as well: work smart. Well, working hard is a given due to the sheer volume of work that involves critical thinking and problem solving, but when possible, automation and streamlining methods always help. I am very lazy and am always looking for ways to shorten the amount of time I actually need to spend on something.

I used to tutor chemistry in undergrad, so it helps that I like to teach, but I'm very big on "teach a man to fish." While it's tempting (and at times necessary) to do things yourself, teaching your staff how to do things and being able to delegate those tasks will pay dividends in the long run (unless you have a dud employee). It's a 2 way street though... I believe anyone can teach you something and my goal is to learn 1 thing a day... I've hit the point where some of my employees will be teaching me things or tricks they've picked up to optimize their work. So each trick to save time becomes another tool for your toolbox that you can impart to others as well.

To me, work is like a video game and the metrics are very much a scorecard. Obviously, patient care comes first, but this helps me triage where to focus my energy.
I can be guilty of becoming impatient and just wanting to first and foremost, get it done. So when staff is too slow even after training, I might send comments and just fix the issues myself and tell them to keep an eye out for it next time. Only thing is most people tend to do better once they've actually experienced it themselves first hand, independently. Experience is a great teacher, honestly, but you know...sometimes time just doesn't wait for anybody and you just gotta get it done.

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I haven't really thought about JCF for like 5 years, but I was thinking a bit about the introverted attitude. If you read Psychological Types, the introverted attitude has a perfectionist tendency. Personally, as a Fi-dominant, that tendency I find present as valued standards. I like things run a certain way but my tendency is to lead by example. I like creating a competitive atmosphere in my workplace because it makes people hungry, and hungry people tend to improve more quickly.

Fi-Te is an interesting dynamic, because I find myself operating best when the emphasis of the dominant function-attitude is complemented by the inferior, rather than the other way around. In other words, if I try to focus too much on the Te system of operation or defining things, the ultimate value that is supported by that (Fi) tends to suffer. Rather, if I emphasize the value I wish to uphold (quality of work) and have the framework in the background supporting the value, things tend to run smoother. So when I converse w/ my staff, I usually focus on the value I want to uphold.

I'm not sure since you are a Irrational-dominant (Pi) rather than myself as a Rational-dominant (Ji). So I'm sure there are differences there. I'm curious what your thoughts are on Ji vs Pi management styles?
It's tough to put into words how Pi (Si) really operates or helps me to take action at all due to its nature. It's just there and isn't concrete enough to really describe in a way that others (or even myself) can fully understand. I can describe more of my usage of it in combination with Te+Fi though. Basically, if I had to summarize the usage of most (or all) of my functions at work, my working style would be as follows: Learn from the past trials and errors, improve on what works via efficient methods, apply existing knowledge forward to different categories of tasks that may not even directly tie to what you learned but you need to be adaptive, learn new things as you go along and remember it and if something really isn't working and you have tried your best to improve on it, perhaps it's time to let it go for good and think of a brand new way to do something. For people related work philosophy, I would say: Give everyone a chance, be firm and test them but also empathetic enough to put yourself in their shoes, lead by example and compassion, but also be ready to put your foot down to keep everything together.
 

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So anyway, I guess the company just sent all the manager level people to this instructional group to give them some pointers/advice on how to be more empathetic/understanding and to engage more while we're all stuck at home. Personally, I didn't find it very helpful for my particular team build, but that's because that's how we are, generally. I'm not completely knocking it and saying it's useless, and I can see how there are some basics involved that would help in the future. I have learned over some years that a good leader is motivational and inspirational, leading by example and empathy. I'm still working on it. My natural inclination is not very "warm", but I try to be more empathetic and open to criticism from the staff.
Makes sense regarding the instruction. Honestly from what I'm experiencing and seeing/hearing from family and friends, it sounds like a lot of companies and organizations are sort of just throwing ideas at the wall and seeing what sticks.

I also believe that leadership by example is perhaps the most important quality. As for warmth, an interesting thing. I found that I had to tone down my warmth from my first team because the relationships became too friend-like and personal, and were difficult to manage. Emotional distance helped me with later teams, even though I still greatly cared for my team members and their wellbeing. More "tough love", as you've put it. I take it there is sort of a balance to be struck with warmth and empathy - being approachable and understanding but not permissive and coddling. And for what it's worth, even being a strong F, I easily appreciate a fair/consistent but less warm leader over one who is warm but unfair/inconsistent. Knowing I'm liked is pleasant, but knowing I'm respected and valued is more important.

Experience is a great teacher, honestly, but you know...sometimes time just doesn't wait for anybody and you just gotta get it done.
Lmao, so true.

Last month we got in the top 10 stores in the area sooo... a total 180.

The store i manage in particular has always been a puzzle for me to solve with high turnover and difficult patronage, and so to have ownership and treat it like my canvas and have a lot of creative freedom to operate how I see fit is really nice.
Congratulations! I'm really glad to hear that you have been successful and enjoy your work. I certainly depend on retail pharmacies for important medications and am grateful on a personal level for what you and others in your position do.
 

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I had a training this morning about managing others during Covid-19. The instructor kept saying things like we should check in on our team individually via conference calls, talk to them more and such. As an ISTJ, this kept making me a bit unbelieving, because it's not really how I approach teamwork. I do think even during a work from home situation, we can still effectively communicate over the phone, instant message and emails. I don't really see the reason to need to see somebody's face in order to do the work. My industry is accounting/finance by the way, so that's also another reason I didn't really agree with the instructor. Of course, I could not say things like "well we are all introverts in my team, so we're fine the way we are". I can already tell the instructor would think that I felt superior or that I didn't grasp the point of the training. So there really was no point in voicing that specific opinion in an hour and a half training. Also, I find American culture to be very Extrovert focused. It even felt like Introversion was some sort of mental illness or a flaw that needed to be improved on via these trainings. However, the senior managers agreed to provide all managers with this training for a reason, so it's obvious they think of it as important. Is it an Extrovert thing? Are most senior managers Extroverts? How do you go about this/go around this as an Introvert and still succeed in your role?
Ha, just have been reading about burnout in our field. One of the pieces of advice given is protect your time, including don't waste time with unnecessary meetings. I'm totally introverted and if I got a lot to do and am trying to get it done, then the last thing I need is sidetracked with a distraction communication. But, yes, this one size fits all managing style is going to de-motivate some people, while others may need to hear from their supervisors and coworkers more to stay engaged.. Knowing your people and what motivates them vs what does not is important in managing people, imo.
 

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I guess it is a little silly but I do feel in more of a work headspace when I am dressed at least somewhat professionally. Given that set has changed from [nice dress, slacks, blouse, flats, jacket] to [actually wearing pants, maybe socks, basically anything besides my PJs]. (Not saying this is why anyone should video chat. I was just amused by the reflection.)
I've mostly telecommuted from home for a few years now. I don't dress up(don't need to zoom), but I do put on clothes i would leave the house in, wear shoes, and shave on a workday. The idea being what you said, "to have more of a work headspace" and not be too relaxed. If I'm in my usual home relax mode, I'm not in day job mode and making myself work will be that much tougher. I suppose it depends on each person's psych needs.
 
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