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I can't control myself anymore. It's definitely due to lack of mental energy. I don't start homework until a few hours before the time I should be going to sleep, even though I plan to hours before. Then when I finish, i never want to go to sleep and decide to relax for more time, since I feel like I need to enjoy something and have time just for myself. I don't use my time wisely and can't get it under control. I think fixing my sleep schedule would fix a lot of my problems, but I can't bring myself to do that either because of lack of willpower (which I just learned in psychology class, correlates with how much sleep you get :-/). I have become so impulse driven these past few weeks/months that I always seek immediate pleasure and relaxation over what would help me in the long run. And then I experience a lot of stress, which wants to make me relax whenever I get a chance, thus creating a negative cycle.

I don't know what to do. I keep telling myself that I will do my work, but this happens everytime. The thing was, that last semester and before, I never had a problem with this. I was a very responsible person, didn't have a poor sleep schedule, etc. In fact, I was a bit J-like in that sense, and would score extremely low on P each time I took MBTI tests, which I've known for years now. I'm asking for any advice that can help. ***Especially things that would help convince me to seek long term rewards over immediate pleasure.

*relaxing and/or procrastinating includes: being online, sitting and thinking, drawing, napping, etc.. Socializing (which I need to do more of, since it helps with mood, so this I think I shouldn't change.) Even things like planning/looking over what I have to do without actually doing it, chores/ cleaning if they are less mentally draining than homework or things I don't want to do, etc. Basically anything other than what I should be doing and delaying those as much as possible. And if I don't fix my impulses, they bother and distract me until I do. I can't work in a negative mood either, or at least I tell myself. Too much stress (which isn't always from schoolwork) makes me in a negative mood too. I have trouble focusing if something is on my mind.

I hate this and want to change back to normal so badly, but I just don't have the mental energy anymore.
 

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If you want to change, you can change it. Thought it takes some time:happy:

I was like you, and it really tasted bitter. You feel the sense of powerlessness, and you had no willpower to change it. You keep procrastinating desperately. Maybe you prefer working before entertainment, but you got stuck in front of a computer desk, and cannot command your body to struggle off the gravity.

I conquerred the damn procrastination, and I can keep working on my stuff 10 hours a day for months. It seems I found a way to mobilize my body.

Here is the advice, I hope it would be helpful to you:

1. It is not the problem of willpower.
You work on math, it costs willpower; you make your body keep running while your lung is going to explode, it costs willpower; you make a difficult decision, like choosing to work other than play, it costs willpower.
However, you must have found, the willpower is so easy to run out.
Our willpower is so weak, it is just a thin and weak guide, it is not able to move the body.
There is another part of you, is like an animal. It is full of impulse, it is quick to act, and it is very diffiult to refuse the temptation. It is just like an elephant, strong but without reason. A string of bananas could lull it away.
The key to conquer procrastination is not let the small guide to do the elephant work, he is too weak to make it, but let the small man to guide the elephant, to make the elephant move as you wish.
That is the key methdology.

2. Here are books I would like to recommend. One book is to elaborate on the theory I referred and the other book is to give out detailed instruction:
a. "The Now Habbit" by Neil Fiore
b. "Happiness Hypothesis" by Jonathan Haidt
It helped me a lot when I get started.

3. Be patient to yourself, you are not that weak.
It takes a long time to control of your body, really takes a lot of time.
When you find you do not get much progress, it is not that you are not good enough. Hang in there, it is not the time to harvest yet.

Please feel free if you have anything to ask
 

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I spent the better part of today thinking about this, since it's something I'm very bad at, and something I'll need more of this term given my very difficult class selections and the importance of doing very well in them. I came to a few conclusions; how relevant they'll be to you, I don't know, but I'll share them nonetheless.

a) Pay attention in class. I just never do this, and it's a pointless and stupid habit that inevitably results in more work later on when I have to do assignments. If you show up, try to take something away from the class, even if it all seems easy. Somewhat unrelated, but whatever.

b) Don't be overly regimented in whatever solutions you do come up (or more broadly, make goals you can actually achieve). It's easy for me to say I won't go online until after 5 PM and x hours of work done, but it's useless if I can only keep it up for a few days. Make small, doable goals instead (eg. when you start an assignment, force yourself not to check any websites until you've done as much of the assignment as you intend to do).

c) Eat. I have no idea if that's a problem for you, but I'm terrible about skipping meals and it makes me nervous and irritable, which doesn't help with executive functioning.
 

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What I have found to be the best solution to this problem is to have someone keep tabs on you. Some external pressure to start adhering to a schedule again. I've gone through the same thing a few months back and I'm slowly recovering from it, emphasis on slowly.

I made an agreement with the professor who helps me with my thesis to meet every week to discuss my progress. The fact that he expects some work to be done (and the fact that I like him) makes it easier for me to at least do something each week, even if it is only 3-4 hours instead of the 20-30 I should be working on it.

Furthermore, I have made a deal with a friend from my study recently to spend 4 days a week at the university to work. Just that small incentive that follows from such a deal makes it way easier to actually keep to a schedule.

Therefore, I suggest you find someone you can work with and make a deal to spend a few hours each week to study together. Make sure to agree on a specific time and place so you have no excuse not to follow through. Once you start working regularly it becomes easier to stick to a sleeping schedule and to keep your motivation up.
 

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I'm having the same problem, more or less, and i'm thinking (only thinking, for now) to get a therapist because i suspect this is somehow caused by some other underlying problem i fail to see. It's driving me mad, actually.
 
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