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The spirit of the spirits
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At this point I'm kinda discontent with my course at university. I am thinking about changing to something else, but nothing looks really good, not a single thing to which I could devote myself completely. All courses are very limited and are aiming to make students professionals at certain things, but to me this feels kinda wrong. In high school people had to learn various things, most of it was theoretical information. The emphasis was put on making us overall smarter and actually helping us to live our lives, while not doing stupid shit, due to lack of knowledge. Meanwhile no matter what higher education, be it college or university, they all try to specialize its students to one very little field. This only has some effect, if you know what you wanna be and you work towards becoming legit professional, but unlike high school, this doesn't seem to help in life overall. So if you made a wrong choice of your course in higher education, most of your knowledge is pretty much useless as it was very specific and not universal.

I'm interested in what do you think about this topic.
 

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Meanwhile no matter what higher education, be it college or university, they all try to specialize its students to one very little field. This only has some effect, if you know what you wanna be and you work towards becoming legit professional
You've somewhat answered your own question: the usefulness of higher education depends on the student's goals, at least in part. It also depends on the economy, whether the student has to pay and how much, and a bunch of other factors.

However, an education that confers only specialized knowledge could be useful outside the specialized field. A person could use that knowledge to build a career in writing, editing, teaching, or consulting about the specialized knowledge.
 

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Regardless of if you've made a wrong choice in what you studied, earning that paper is a benefit. You can argue about student debt, waste of time, whatever, but the reality is that having a degree in something opens more options for you than not having one. Entry salary vs. minimum wage. Supervisory vs. grunt.

Having a degree usually also lets employers know as well that you 'stuck it out' through x many years of higher learning in order to get that paper, so you at least 'supposedly' have a certain level of perseverance. Yes, it may all be a bunch of bullshit that doesn't really say anything about the person or their chances; but having the paper is sometimes the difference between whether or not you even get the interview. If you had identical experience as another, they with the added credential will most likely get the interview. If you both did equally well in the interview, they would most likely get the job.

If you get the paper, get into the workforce and find that it's not what you want to be doing, there's still time to tweak the plan. Go back to trade school or something, heck even go back to college/university. Personally, I've heard from a number of people who eventually got into a field that had nothing to do with what they graduated in. Life just sort of happened and they took chances with whatever opportunity became available.

Getting it done the first time around isn't the only way one can become 'successful', but it's usually the easier path. Ofc, it's also not for everyone.
 

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The spirit of the spirits
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Discussion Starter #4
You've somewhat answered your own question: the usefulness of higher education depends on the student's goals, at least in part. It also depends on the economy, whether the student has to pay and how much, and a bunch of other factors.
Just to make it clearer, I don't have to pay for education and I think I can change my course rather easily, while still staying in free place. But I just wonder about actual knowledge quality I'm getting there. Or rather usability of that kind of knowledge. I just kinda expected, that university will be more universal than college, more similar to how school was and it would encourage seeking knowledge, but at least in my case, it looks like university isn't exactly place for knowledge, it's more like advanced professional school. I know, it's just my first year, but I haven't seen anything, that could let me do cool stuff like actual research, creative thinking or other science stuff.
 

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I just kinda expected, that university will be more universal than college, more similar to how school was and it would encourage seeking knowledge
That is what university is like here in the United States. In the first year especially, students study very general topics and learn specialized knowledge later. What are you studying?
 

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The spirit of the spirits
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Discussion Starter #6
That is what university is like here in the United States. In the first year especially, students study very general topics and learn specialized knowledge later. What are you studying?
As I figured out, what we call main course here, is called major overseas. It's Environmental Science and Ecology. My mandatory courses were:
English C1
General Ecology
General and Analytical Chemistry
Animal Biology
Environment and Development
Environmental Geology (I have no idea, why it's not called basic geology, as you can't do geology without going outside)
General Physics
Environmental Geology and Ecology Practice

All of them aren't very specialized yet, objectively speaking, but after being fresh outta high school (well gymnasium, but I converted its name to American equivalent). Also it looks like some courses are already teaching the same stuff. For example Ecology and that Development courses are pretty much identical. It seems like there will be more very similar courses, where I will barely have anything new to learn.

And here is a short list of courses I chose to study myself (shouldn't they be called minors then?):
Social Welfare
Japanese Language level 1
Civilization History
English C1 (I had to either study English or other language, so it's semi-mandatory course. No matter what you want to study, you must reach English C1 level, so it's a mandatory course, but not major mandatory.)
 

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Oh, you are studying a science. In the U.S., it's normal for science students to take somewhat specialized courses early in university because we have a lot of prerequisites to fulfill. Your courses will get more and more specialized as you continue.
 

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The spirit of the spirits
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Discussion Starter #8
Oh, you are studying a science. In the U.S., it's normal for science students to take somewhat specialized courses early in university because we have a lot of prerequisites to fulfill. Your courses will get more and more specialized as you continue.
What do you mean by science? Everyone in university studies science, it's pretty much obvious thing, that doesn't need to be pointed out. Be it social, physical, humanitarian or IT, they are all sciences, the only exception are arts, but even then, here it's more like science, rather than appreciation (or emotional expression) place. Perhaps you mean, that I study, what is 'classic' science. Because people tend to associate science with all that cool fiction, which has roots in chemistry, physics or biology, but those sciences are in physical science group or natural science group. But take for example psychology, history or IT and in the end they are still sciences. They may be "softer" or have parts of them loaned from those main 3, but they are still sciences.

Sorry for nerding out.

Anyway, what you are saying, that will become more specialized, already feels specialized. It's true what you are saying, it will change and become narrower, but I can't keep thinking is it truly okay for it to be so narrow. The potential for success is great, if you think it suits you, but if you did a mistake in your choice, then potential for failure is high too. It's a big gamble. I wanna make it clear, I made this thread not to doubt my own course specifically, but rather to ask if it's truly okay for people, who are fresh outta high school to make such a big decisions of their life and suddenly have tons of responsibility. Or maybe, is it really okay for such important institution to be so specialized and almost inflexible. And most importantly, what's the worth of such minimalization of human's one interest and then development of only one interest (it eats up a lot of time and kinda locks out of other interests). Just how meaningful this is?

I just recently found this video and I think it offers some insight:

Quick note:
I would like this thread to continue without thinking, that there are financial loses in education. I just want, that thread will focus on education and it's worthiness for person and in person's life. I wanna see, what others think about university's education.
 

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At this point I'm kinda discontent with my course at university. I am thinking about changing to something else, but nothing looks really good, not a single thing to which I could devote myself completely. All courses are very limited and are aiming to make students professionals at certain things, but to me this feels kinda wrong. In high school people had to learn various things, most of it was theoretical information. The emphasis was put on making us overall smarter and actually helping us to live our lives, while not doing stupid shit, due to lack of knowledge. Meanwhile no matter what higher education, be it college or university, they all try to specialize its students to one very little field. This only has some effect, if you know what you wanna be and you work towards becoming legit professional, but unlike high school, this doesn't seem to help in life overall. So if you made a wrong choice of your course in higher education, most of your knowledge is pretty much useless as it was very specific and not universal.

I'm interested in what do you think about this topic.
I absolutely agree with you.
 

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I have an AA in Communications. It was not even worth the effort trying to get that thing. I could not get past math required to transfer. If I had I may have just tried for a Bachelors. My parents were mad at me for repeatedly failing college level math. It was a hamster wheel of nothing. Finally I realized I could graduate with the level of math I had and just graduated with what I had. Employers don't care that I have it, and later I found out Communications is a joke of a major. I think I should have taken a different major instead of taking classes that interested me. Like culture or gender studies. I'm so mad at myself for not dropping out of college sooner.
 

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It seems you are aiming for knowledge as opposed to only attaining degree, per se. That's good, red.

I was in electrical engineering and here we might approach things rather differently. In our engineering faculty, for all majors, around half of the studies are more on the fundamental sciences and engineerings and maths. When i say fundamental it is clearly more advanced than what we learned in high school but still, it is all general physics, mechanicals, thermodynamics, chemistries, and all the assorted relevant sciences and maths required to compute them.

We simply don't go specialized very early. Only on third years we went with specialization, somewhat gradual but accelerated.

To some, they found that as very boring. To the industries (as consumers) it invoke the complaints on "education mismatch".

I say, whatever, let them be. Imo this is more proper, we learned everything as basics and it should be more enlightening. It is.
 

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I regret going to college. I studied something not lucrative and little did I know upon graduation that there would be few jobs in my field. The labor statistics either were wrong or I graduated during a bad time. I could have studied something that would have made me more money but I likely would have done poorly at it since I don't think I'm that smart. I should have gone to trade school.

After spending all that time and money on school, I still had to start from the bottom and spent years doing jobs that a high school graduate could do. I'm turning 31 next month and finally make $18 an hour after 3 years at the same job. I live in a high-cost area so that money doesn't go very far. I'm fortunate enough that I can still pay my bills but that doesn't mean I haven't wasted my...life.

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