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I'm talking about between the ages of about six and thirteen...

A Story:

When I was in 4th Grade, my teacher got up in front of the class one morning and told us about an article she had just read. The article was titled, "Brown Eyes Better," and asserted that recent research had proven that people with brown eyes were smarter than people with other eye colors. Based on that article, my teacher told us that she was going to divide the class into two groups: those who had brown eyes and those who did not. I had blue eyes, so I was put in the "inferior" group with at least half of my other classmates.

Anyway, the morning progressed and the kids with brown eyes were given special treatment. I don't remember everything, but I do remember that at one point the brown-eyed kids were allowed to leave their desks and play with the toys in classroom, while the rest of us were to remain at our desks and read.

Usually, I prefered to read anyway, so I shouldn't have been upset, right? But I was. By the time recess rolled around, I was in tears and sobbing over the injustice of it all. My teacher noticed this and asked me to stay behind for a moment while the rest of the class went to recess. Then she told me the truth: that there really was no such article, that brown-eyes people were not any better than anyone else, and that it was all an experiment to teach the class about the effects of prejudice and elitism (I don't remember if she used those exact words). She promised me that it would all be over after recess, and asked me to not tell anyone else in the meantime, that she would tell the whole class herself when they all came back.

But it seems remarkable to me, now, that at the time I was the only kid in our class of thirty who felt so strongly about the whole thing that it moved me to tears. I remember some other kids complaining about it, sure. I also remember that some of the brown-eyed kids really soaked in the special treatment, while a few others felt bad for the rest of us (I even remember one or two of the brown-eyed kids opting to stay at their desks and read instead of going off to play). But I was the only one who cried.

I can remember a few other times similar to the above, but one story is enough to illustrate.

So now, I'm just curious if any of you had similar experiences as children? Did you take injustice personally? Were you so affected by it that you couldn't move on emotionally until the injustice was reconciled?
 

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To see things such as the one in your story or the video really make me think about the underlying causes of injustices. We start wars within each other for the simple reason of being different or feeling superior to others. If I would've been placed under similar circumstances, I don't know what I would've done. This is even more terrifying when we realize that this is happening now, at this very moment somewhere in the world. It could be happening just outside my own house.
 

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lol hmmmmmm mine's a little different then yours

I've always been a protector, living with a abuser for some years gave me a tough exterior. I did what it took to protect people and I've done it not using violence. through the years If i see injustice I don't care who you are(sometimes I do), you will get a piece of mind. Getting rid of each douche bag at a a time.
 

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I have some stories. Like in third grade when the principle of my Catholic grade school called me to the front of the room to embarrass me because my uniform was wrinkled. I was not embarrassed I was well aware that this was not my responsibility in the third grade. I was also aware of what a hateful human being this nun was.

When the same school showed us a movie on the pope's riches and jewels in the Vatican, then showed us the starving children in Africa and India, I knew if the church gave up even just some of it's wealth, those children wouldn't be starving anymore.

When this same school showed us a movie on abortion and the fetuses in trash cans, I again knew that this was abhorable behavior among these adults to show this graphic propaganda to children.
 

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My sense of justice as a child? Very strong. I remember distinctly having heated arguments when I was as young as 6 with my dad about why the church didn't allow girls to be priests, and how girls were just as good as boys at such jobs and it was unfair. I was so... indignant. I can't remember how he tried to explain it to me, but I just remember the feeling of being so angry that people would just stop you from doing the job you wanted to do, and were good at, just because you were a girl...

One of the only times I have ever struck someone in my life was over a bullying incident involving my little sister. This girl on our road called Stephanie used to bully my sister constantly, and we were constantly butting heads over it. One day she pushed my sister off her bike, and I just snapped and went up and smacked her... and she never targeted my sister again afterwards :crazy: her mom actually tried to give out to me about it afterwards and threatened to tell my parents, but I was so angry I told her to go ahead, coz I knew my dad would believe me anyway.

I used to get really angry as well when andults tried to talk over me, interrupt me, or correct me just because they were grown up and I was a child. When I was in 4th class (ecquivalent of 6th grade), I got into a HUGE fight with my teacher because she tried to argue that Canada was not a part of North America (she mistook North America for the U.S.), but I kept repeating that North America was in fact a continent, and it included Canada. That teacher didn't like me very much for correcting her, but dammit I was *right*!! :dry:
 

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Yes, and I still do.

I used to wander about in a dream around the playground. I'd drift in and out of games with other childeren, dance about, sing to myself, pick leaves and flowers...and then I might spot two childeren being unkind to another, or something like that, and I'd sort of apear behind them in a very menicing fashion. You did not bully childeren in MY playground.

There were two particular girls who were younger than me, who were always picking on another little girl, who was very sweet. They used to steal her coat and tease her with it while she sat crying and shivering. I tried to scare them off, and I was always retreiving her things from them. In the end I gave both their ponytails a swift tug, a kick in the shins, and told them next time I'd rough them up behind a shed.

One of them told her brother who was in my year what I did, I would have let it go, but he tried to insult me using my dyslexia (it was like lighting a fuse), so I rugby tackled him. A teacher apeared, I cried, and he got in a lot of trouble. After that, no more problems.

If I see injustice or sense it, then it really gets under my skin. It's worse when it's adults towards a child.

That thing with the blue and brown eyes though? Something similar happened to me, but it wasn't an experiment and it was to do with acedemic attaiment. We were all set by tables, and the "clever" childeren got more priveledges. I was on the "stupid and naughty table" so I didn't have any. Every day was a new opertunity for ritulistic humilation or degrigation. At first the other childeren laughed at me and were unkind, but after a while they started to get very upset by it. They realised what the teacher was doing was wrong, and some of the girls would come over and hug me after something upsetting happened. I felt like school was my personal hell, with everything set up so I failed and had to watch the other childeren be rewarded for doing things I simply could not do. It wasn't just the dyslexia, they seemed to distrust and mislike me as a person because I liked to play on my own and was especially imaginative. I even got sent to a docotor by the school nurse for being dreamy.

I think going through that (and other expirences), and the anger I feel as an adult, when I can see how wrong it was and how badly it affected me even to this day, has made me very sensitive to these types of injustice. I am very pro-disabled rights, and I make a piont of learning about conditions beyond my own so I can be acepting and understanding of others. Gay rights, racial and sexual equality are all also importaint to me (I explore this a lot in my writing).It made me very upset other dyslexics and disabled people did not support each other more, especially wealthy and sucessful ones, and I intend to do something to try and make things better. I really want to make the world a slightly better place for everyone. If I ever get rich or influentual I will try and use that to help make the world a more equal and fair place, especially for those who struggle at school or to fit into societies little boxes of correctness.

I want to fix everything, but I know I can only really focus on one or two areas if I want to have any impact. I sleep better at night if I know I am doing even something small to improve things. I get agitated if I feel injustice is going entirly unchecked, it's as if I am complicit in the whole thing. I just think, if everyone did a little bit more, ven just a few people, the world would so much better. I don't want to be someone who sees these types of problems and simply complains or dislikes it.

I feel as though this is partly my world, and I am therefore partly responsible for it, and all those in it.
 

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I really want to post something here but I just can't think of any examples.

I used to just do what I was told as a child and never question anything. My brother who is an INTP and is 22 months younger than me was the one trying to protect me and used to tell me to stick up for myself when I was being bullied in school.

I was always very quiet, shy and sensitive as a child.
 
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