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To anyone out there loving their job:

- What do you do?
- Why do you love it?
- How did you come to love it?


I know it's an unreal aim to love your job (although I've heard the phrase), so if you can say quite positively that you think your job is "actually quite alright", you're allowed to answer too.
 

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I love my job , too. My job is this free online slots with bonus. I think that every person dreams of having their work as a hobby. I have now achieved this goal and set several new goals for myself. That 's cool!
 

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I love my industry and the area I am in.

I like working half on the ground and half administrative in Residential Health Care

I will say I am trying to shift more to like what I applied for last night.

Which is, Quality Improvement Manager or Program Director vs what I have done alot which is Client/Residential Supervising or Program Manager.

So same industry and not too much elevation desired or too much of an overall shift.

Except huge difference would be... For Quality Improvement Manager I would not have to manage any of the entry level staff and daily operations at all, and as a program director very little. Which would be hella nice because I am really good at implementing care plans and putting out fires and assessing compliance etc and creating. So I would still be on the ground with clients and the supervising staff, but could bypass the horribleness of concerning myself with measly and petty non sense which comes up with the entry level employee front line. Just to be clear I can manage and train them all well, I would just rather spend all my time creating the processes and teach them to supervisors, or train in classroom.

Basically eliminate babysitting young adults schedules and whether they did their chores. I have done it a while. Supervising daily operations I am very over. And frankly it may sound arrogant but way too overqualified with my knowledge of my industry, not simply my knowledge but my ability in what I bring to the table because of haven been supervising role so much on the ground I am able to implement and create very cohesive and effective processes that help with costs, production, safety, emergency response, quality of service, compliance laws, and environment. I love going and assessing how cohesive sites, set up, and care plans, and integrating the county written plan to the internal business, and helping clients become successful and mentoring other supervisors on how to incorporate.

I have been asked about a few roles for advancement I passed on because they were not me. HR/Scheduling, I was like Ew no fricken way. Training Director, I know why they asked me that I am seasoned at what I do, but I do not want to have my entire job be to train daily. Independent Living Services Director, While I did open it regionally and create the process internal I did not want to work with that block specialized exclusive the clients in the sect are a huge pain in the ass who either are just capitalizing on it to get disability and being fraudulent or they are in severe need of 24/7 care and have cheap county case management neglecting their needs which means more time spent arguing with teams and corresponding then the actual service hours the client gets or profit. SO I dont mind setting up the program but fuck being stuck there as the director of it. Ew no. Lastly I was asked about my interest in Outreach Director, this made sense as far as my ability to set up sites, integrate plans, etc etc, but Outreach is ultimately responsible for the profits and that means taking clients and placing them where ever the owner says. I do not agree with placing humans like they are cattle. Especially mental health and behavioral crisis persons.

So I love my industry. Like working with clients in residential care. I just would not like to be in direct supervising role on the ground and one channel removed. It would be awesome to be on the ground quality control and process set up etc with no management of entry level, and just training supervisors and assessing doings audits.

I like having a purpose of helping others create a purpose driven life plan in their daily living and recreation/occupational.

I like the unpredictability and adrenaline involved (to a degree).

It is not weird I love my job, because I have always liked to create processes even as a child, and I like the level of excitement and change working with people having purpose in helping provide them purpose and safety (clients), and mentoring supervisors with potential who just need encouragement and to learn the ropes.
 

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My job is really enjoyable.

Gardening
I enjoy it because I'm my own boss, and it's about aesthetics in the end of the day--despite me being quite poor at the technical side of it, and I always felt my default role in life is like an artist. It's fun.
Because I enjoy it, and its many benefits, can't help but love doing it.

An important side note, on the side I do a lot of writing too. I guess if I didn't have that, garden landscaping would feel like an end of the road job to me, and I would probably hate it... That's because my life goals are all there... and I'm also planning on studying it. 😉
 

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When I first got into it, I loved my career. Then it became routine and dull. Fortunately, things took an unexpected twist about 3 years ago. Now not only is it interesting, but I feel like I'm doing something that's actually meaningful.

I started off my work life as an accounting clerk, but had always loved computers and video games. I began learning how to build and repair them as a hobby. Then someone at work who knew I had a 386SX at home asked me to take a look at some new computers they had bought. I ran some tests, and found that their vendor had lied about the computer specifications. So I got drafted as a computer tech. I learned on the job, then studied for certification, and got my paper.

But then I stopped working on hardware and got stuck for years in fairly boring help desk work. It paid the bills, and was at least slightly interesting. Then I got laid off the job due to mandated cutbacks, but my employer liked my work well enough to try and find me another position. What I ended up with was rather unexpected.

I interviewed for and got a position as an SCADA operator for the power company. In a nutshell, that means I monitor the power grid for problems. If something comes up (like they can't get readings from a power plant), it's up to me to troubleshoot the problem. If I can't fix it myself remotely, then I determine the likely cause of the problem send someone appropriate out to repair the faulty equipment. There's a lot more to it than just that, but that's one of the core responsibilities.

It's interesting, and allows me the conceit that I'm helping to keep civilization running. Win/win.
 

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I think my job easily qualifies as "actually quite alright". I work in human services. The work is engaging, meaningful, and interesting. It is usually enjoyable. Sometimes it can be emotionally draining, a lot of policy, and a lot of paperwork. The salary is ok, and the benefits and stability are very good. I have above-average higher-ups and coworkers. Overall it gets my thumbs-up.

As for how I came to love it - well, I majored in psychology. I volunteered in schools and took counseling classes with the thought of school psychology, but in my country school counseling jobs are somewhat scarce, often overlap with administrative responsibilities, and require an additional 2-3 year degree, and I didn't feel ready to commit to that. Instead, I tried my hand at many different jobs after graduation. That brought me to applying to my current position.

If/when I change jobs again, I might consider teaching younger grades, or going into SLP or OT. I really enjoy getting to be in a "helping" role but might like a little more creativity and in-depth interaction.

counterintuitive said:
Anyone can learn to code, but it helps if you have strong logic. There's a misconception that you have to be good at math-- I think it's not really "math", but logic in particular. If you are good at proofs, formal logic, or logic puzzles, you would probably be able to learn to code relatively easily. I didn't learn at all until I was 26 (I'm 29 now).
I appreciate you saying this. I was surprised to discover I took to coding fairly quickly when I tried my hand at HTML and CSS a number of years ago. In my case it was anal aesthetic precision that was to my benefit. I don't know that I would do well at coding as a career, but I certainly enjoyed crafting and updating websites as a hobby for a while. I'm afraid I let it go and am far beyond the times now, lol.
 

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ENFP, 4w5, so/s_ Cosmic
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I believe Gob was an important part of what made the Fox (and later, Netflix) sitcom Arrested Development the success that it was. Without him, and others (of course), the award-winning comedy series that was Arrested Development just wouldn't have been the same.
 

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Why is it an aim to love your job?

Sounds unhealthy to aim for it.
 
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