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Hey there,

I’m a psychological science student studying externally in Australia. I want to know what the opportunities are for a psychological science graduate and if anyone’s had any stories going down the path of psychology, AI , neuroscience* or research , I would like to know what that experience was like.

I don’t like the idea of becoming a psychologist and my grades are not good enough.

I would like to know whether if there are any researchers or any one else who knows how to give advice in relation to a research career and deciding on what job I could connect to my study is a big concern for me .

How do we connect passion for psychology, with a job that’s on the market? Should I stick to a more skilled study or diploma instead like IT or engineering?
 

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The spirit of the spirits
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I would like to know what that experience was like.
Surprisingly social science. By that I mean group works are mandatory and you will be forced to work with some ugly mugs (not really they are ugly, but I get cranky, when I'm forced to work in group and use Facebook to chat and be interrupted) wheter you like it or not. At first it may even feel dumb, but later topics get a bit more advanced. There's no such things are being interested in psychology, but also being a loner. That's my experience only after taking a minor course of psychology once and I survived in social walfare minor too, but it's pretty clear to me already what will happen during other 4 years.

Whether you should take psychology depends on your character. If you are anxious loner, then it's not for you. If you enjoy chatting with others about your assumptions of society, then yeah go for it. If you love your own personal time and don't mind dealing with rules and bullshit riddles, then go to sciences. Go to IT, if you are practical person and you can just work (and work for real, not Youtubing or chatting at the same time) with your computer for hours. Go to art, if you sometimes want to look at some bobs and vegana, then create some questionable things and claim it to be work of art. Go to law if you want to be professional crook. Go to politics if you want to be professional troll. Go to engineering if you just want to build things of your dreams and don't mind drinking oil and eatign some nuts everyday.
 

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I demand the return of the crazy face! :crazy:
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I'm a data scientist and I know several people who have a psychology degree and went into either data science (can be related to AI but not necessarily) or marketing (a practical application of psychology). Caveat is I'm American and not sure how different the job markets in these fields are in Australia.

I think there's a ton of opportunity for you in these fields.

I'm on my phone now so I'll edit to add more later.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm a data scientist and I know several people who have a psychology degree and went into either data science (can be related to AI but not necessarily) or marketing (a practical application of psychology). Caveat is I'm American and not sure how different the job markets in these fields are in Australia.

I think there's a ton of opportunity for you in these fields.

I'm on my phone now so I'll edit to add more later.
what is a data science workplace like?
 

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I demand the return of the crazy face! :crazy:
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what is a data science workplace like?
Sorry I forgot. To answer your question, I don't work in a "data science workplace" in that the primary operation of the workplace is not data science, and I never have, so I can't really comment. Right now, I'm the only data scientist in my office and I used to be one of two at my old job. In terms of environment and culture, if that's what you're asking, every company is different. But one advantage of being in an in-demand/"hot" field is that you can change companies/jobs more easily.


ETA:

Hey there,

I’m a psychological science student studying externally in Australia. I want to know what the opportunities are for a psychological science graduate and if anyone’s had any stories going down the path of psychology, AI , neuroscience* or research , I would like to know what that experience was like.

I don’t like the idea of becoming a psychologist and my grades are not good enough.

I would like to know whether if there are any researchers or any one else who knows how to give advice in relation to a research career and deciding on what job I could connect to my study is a big concern for me .

How do we connect passion for psychology, with a job that’s on the market? Should I stick to a more skilled study or diploma instead like IT or engineering?
The options you've listed here are reallly different, so my first question is, what is it that you actually want to do?

The data science/AI path is going to be primarily learning to code (programming) and working at a computer mostly by yourself solving interesting problems and analyzing data. Does that sound like something you'd want to do?

If so, and you don't have a programming background currently, you'd need to get one. You can do programming classes now while you're in school, or look at a coding boot camp after you graduate. If you're considering more study, you can look into master's programs in data science or related fields. Personally, I think you can teach yourself to code without too much help from others but employers often want a credential.

As for research, are you thinking more corporate R&D or government/academic research? If it's the former, marketing and consumer research are good opportunities for psych grads but you would definitely need a master's degree if not a PhD to get into corporate R&D. You'd mostly design and carry out studies. I don't know much about academic research except that there are fewer jobs available than in corporate R&D.

idk anything about neuroscience either, sorry. haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry I forgot. To answer your question, I don't work in a "data science workplace" in that the primary operation of the workplace is not data science, and I never have, so I can't really comment. Right now, I'm the only data scientist in my office and I used to be one of two at my old job. In terms of environment and culture, if that's what you're asking, every company is different. But one advantage of being in an in-demand/"hot" field is that you can change companies/jobs more easily.

ETA:

The options you've listed here are reallly different, so my first question is, what is it that you actually want to do?

The data science/AI path is going to be primarily learning to code (programming) and working at a computer mostly by yourself solving interesting problems and analyzing data. Does that sound like something you'd want to do?

So in data science you get to work in different workplaces? That sounds neat

On answering the question, what it is that I want to do.. it seems I have so many different things. When I was a kid I wanted to be a politician, so I went into the Law subject and did really well and got into honours.

I dropped out because I thought maybe a research workplace in terms of brain research or cognitive neuroscience would be more interesting. Other than that I was selected even into the no 1 university in Australia based on my law grades and record

Unfortunately, there aren’t many brain research workplaces as they are not in demand for anything useful and my grades aren’t good enough in my subject , psychology, to do a PhD . The lack of energy for the subject psychology was massively unexpected because in high school I got an A for research project in psychology. Likewise, I started a research project in cognitive neuroscience with a professor at my university, which is still underway.

I don’t mind data science , it’s the most interesting topic of a list of topics in psychology. It seems as though I would have to settle for it.

What I want to do is irrelevant for the job market. Though, I wanted to be a neuroscience researcher, work a job and I want to be a political activist at some point.


I’m also passionate about music and film, and have a story I really want to make for the big screen. I just need my own money I guess


If so, and you don't have a programming background currently, you'd need to get one. You can do programming classes now while you're in school, or look at a coding boot camp after you graduate. If you're considering more study, you can look into master's programs in data science or related fields. Personally, I think you can teach yourself to code without too much help from others but employers often want a credential.

As for research, are you thinking more corporate R&D or government/academic research? If it's the former, marketing and consumer research are good opportunities for psych grads but you would definitely need a master's degree if not a PhD to get into corporate R&D. You'd mostly design and carry out studies. I don't know much about academic research except that there are fewer jobs available than in corporate R&D.

idk anything about neuroscience either, sorry. haha.

Do you have to know programming to do data science or work in the research field? Right now with my degree we’ve learned and I am still learning SPSS . I find it kinda interesting, not the most interesting thing on planet Earth .


R&D sounds like an opportunity. What qualification do you think would help get me into a company or field like that, other than with a psychology degree?
 

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I demand the return of the crazy face! :crazy:
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@xraydav

It sounds like you have a broad set of interests but got caught off-guard by the lack of opportunity in the field of cognitive neuroscience.

The academic route is out if you can't get a PhD. That will also eliminate some opportunity within the corporate R&D space. A master's or PhD in a technical field is necessary for R&D pretty much, and PhDs are heavily preferred. You'd be competing against people with PhDs and in more closely-related fields too. Are you currently completing a master's or is this a bachelor's degree? A master's in psychology, if you have enough of a stats background, can be alright for consumer/marketing research.

I think you'd need to reframe your resume/CV a lot to fit with what corporate R&D is looking for. Check out the career advising at your university since they can help you do this.

For data science, you absolutely need to be able to code. You don't need to be proficient in all languages or all aspects. SPSS is less widely used than Python, R, and SAS, which are the three that I've used (mostly Python). I dabbled in SPSS but tbh I didn't find it very interesting compared to Python especially. But SPSS is still used.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@xraydav

It sounds like you have a broad set of interests but got caught off-guard by the lack of opportunity in the field of cognitive neuroscience.
This is very true and to be honest, a very confronting experience


The academic route is out if you can't get a PhD. That will also eliminate some opportunity within the corporate R&D space. A master's or PhD in a technical field is necessary for R&D pretty much, and PhDs are heavily preferred. You'd be competing against people with PhDs and in more closely-related fields too. Are you currently completing a master's or is this a bachelor's degree? A master's in psychology, if you have enough of a stats background, can be alright for consumer/marketing research.

I could possibly get into a Masters program if I try really hard, but PhD is out of question at this point.

I’m currently completing a Bachelor’s Degree


I think you'd need to reframe your resume/CV a lot to fit with what corporate R&D is looking for. Check out the career advising at your university since they can help you do this.

For data science, you absolutely need to be able to code. You don't need to be proficient in all languages or all aspects. SPSS is less widely used than Python, R, and SAS, which are the three that I've used (mostly Python). I dabbled in SPSS but tbh I didn't find it very interesting compared to Python especially. But SPSS is still used.

Maybe I need to go get professional career counselling at the university

I don’t really know how to code that well, I’ve tried, I’m just not good at it :(
 

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"I’m also passionate about music and film, and have a story I really want to make for the big screen. I just need my own money I guess
On the off chance your go is there, I'm really thinking of starting an online course for professional writing & editing, in Australia, because I do love stories, characters, and things relating. There was something that I was doing, that made me realise that 'writing' was special to me. And that's why now, despite my other paths of education, and profeciencies, I've decided to make a career in that. If you were to ask me, what career should I choose, I'd say choose the career that is special to you. And is probably the place where you can make your most meaningful contribution, meaningful to you. Good luck with it.

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