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Discussion Starter #1
So INTP community, how do you generate ideas?
For example: You get assigned a topic for a paper. How do you brainstorm? How do you use the brainstormed ideas? Do you like to give your thought a definite (linear) direction first, or do you brainstorm everything and then connect it?

I'd guess that INTPs would let the imagination throw up all sorts of somewhat relevant ideas, and then determine how the ideas make sense together (the big picture).
But I don't know. You tell me.
 

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I personally don't even make a plan and let it go with the flow. Like ad lib but for writing. I always get top marks on them too. In your face teachers who say good stories have to be planned first. :crazy:
 

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I do the same thing. I just start typing. If I have an idea that I cannot add to or think is unnecessary, then I will type a one sentence summary of the idea and skip it. I believe that everything is in the editing, and will rework an assignment two or more times by adding to, moving, or deleting paragraphs.

Often when I think that I have finished something I will come back the next day to see if it can be improved. My procrastination tends to get in the way of that process.
 

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Yep. Same here. I just start writing. It is often the first draft of about 100, and I am never 100% satisfied with the outcome.

Bit o' J'ness in there methinks.
 

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I procrastinate, panic somewhat about the imminent deadline, procrastinate some more, and then snatch whatever idea offered by my imagination and run with it in the last fifteen minutes or so. It's earned me a 90 percent or above most of the time, and the highest score in my grade in the midterms. In your face, essay outlines and brainstorm sheets.
 

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Yep. Same here. I just start writing. It is often the first draft of about 100, and I am never 100% satisfied with the outcome.

Bit o' J'ness in there methinks.
What you're describing there sounds more like P; leaving it open to editing forever instead of considering it finished at some point.

As for how I generate ideas, mostly I just start writing and edit later, sometimes I make a thoughtmap and write down a word or sentence in the middle, surrounding it with every word I associate with that sentence/word. Or I start answering those lists of "questions for your main character (or similar)" that you sometimes find online. I never finish them since they become a distraction from the main work, but sometimes I get good ideas from them.
 

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I like to plan first. If it's a team thing, I'll get a big sheet of paper and draw some sort of mind map. I'll write down points we have to include, how we can present the points, how things should be set out, and so on and so forth. This goes on until the whole thing is properly and precisely planned so that none of my teammates can do anything wrong. I then continue to make the finished product by myself because I know they'll find SOMETHING to mess up.

If I have to do a project or essay by myself, it's bullet points. I'll have the whole thing written out in non-sentences first if I can. It helps me avoid repeating myself or babbling on with something unrelated and not being able to get back on topic.
 

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Two things come to mind. First, its better when its not forced. Sitting down behind that blank screen and telling yourself it has to happen is a recipe for writers block.

Second is that I often go for an organically growing solution. More bottom-up than top-down.
 

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The ideas generate me.

In the case where I happen to have to write an essay about something, ideas pop up whether I try to come up with them or not.

I list them.
I link them.
The ideas themselves become meaningless, indifferentiated, they only make sense through their relationships to one another, merge into one "sub-system" of thought.

The sub-system is phagocyted by/incorporated into the... well, "me".

I end up with a very short paper that I would see as a snapshot of a factorised equation defining the rules of my thinking on the subject.
Of course imperfect because of the many limitations I find in language, and the ever-evolving nature of the process.

I always had average philosophy grades, but an awesome grade/length ratio.
 

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What you're describing there sounds more like P; leaving it open to editing forever instead of considering it finished at some point.
I was more referring to the 100% satisfaction, I agree, the potential open-endedness is P.
 

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I like to plan first. If it's a team thing, I'll get a big sheet of paper and draw some sort of mind map. I'll write down points we have to include, how we can present the points, how things should be set out, and so on and so forth. This goes on until the whole thing is properly and precisely planned so that none of my teammates can do anything wrong. I then continue to make the finished product by myself because I know they'll find SOMETHING to mess up.

If I have to do a project or essay by myself, it's bullet points. I'll have the whole thing written out in non-sentences first if I can. It helps me avoid repeating myself or babbling on with something unrelated and not being able to get back on topic.
I do this if I have to do a presentation. Something else which has about 100 drafts.:crazy:
 

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*facepalm*
I was thinking of those two things as the same thing; if it's never 100% perfect, then it's never 100% finished.

But I think I get what you meant now.
 

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I dunno, I just write and edit as I go along. Depending on the class/topic, I'll just write stream-of-consciousness style. Once it even got me a 100% on a surprise in-class essay.

If it's uninteresting stuff (like 90% of school), then I put it off till the day the paper is due, and wake up early enough to bullshit my way through it (and still get at least a B).

Not the best method, but hey, it's worked for me.
 
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I don't really "generate" ideas, they just appear extemporaneously, sometimes even when I'm trying to think of something else (although, technically, since they emerge from the folds within my brain, they ARE generated by my mind). I add them to whatever I'm doing as they seem fit. It's like building a wall with colorful bricks.

Due to procrastination, this tends to happen quickly...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The ideas generate me.

In the case where I happen to have to write an essay about something, ideas pop up whether I try to come up with them or not.

I list them.
I link them.
The ideas themselves become meaningless, indifferentiated, they only make sense through their relationships to one another, merge into one "sub-system" of thought.
This is pretty much what I usually to do. First, a bunch of ideas 'randomly' appear, but the most important aspect to me is the connections. I think my essay is good if I've managed to draw interesting connections between (often, seemingly unrelated) ideas. Analogies ftw

A common theme seems to be procrastination. I've cut back on that habit since college started, but I still stand by the assertion that my work is better if done at the last minute.

Does anyone else hate teacher-guided editing? I always feel like teachers want to change my essay just because they don't like the way it's organized. Which is annoying because changing the order of the ideas/paragraphs changes the way that they need to be connected. My papers are organized the way the are because it makes sense...in my head at least.
 
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