Personality Cafe banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,949 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm kinda stuck in a choice.

I have two jobs that I can get, either with their own benefits and downsides.

First is Back Office Lead (HR)

Pro: I'd actually enjoy the work. I hire and train new employees. Perform general back office duties, like money management and office stock. And general store duties to fill in where needed. I have a psych degree, and ultimately I'd like to get the HR experience so I can apply for true HR jobs in the future. It's also much closer--maybe a 15-20 minute drive.

Con: Pay. It pays like 35k.

Second is Customer Service/Financial Advisor

Pro: Pay. It pays 44k and has amazing benefits. Pretty much it. I guess I 'might' be able to one day move into a HR position within the company, but from what I understand about HR, it's not easy.

Con: The work is soul sucking. Sit at a chair and answer phone calls about customer service and giving mild financial advice. No real goal with this position. Can't go up anywhere. It's also really far away. An hour each way. Which is 10 hours a week of just driving!

I'm a recent college grad. 35k is enough to pay my loans and stay afloat. Naturally 44k would allow me to start saving now and be comfortable.

---

If you were in the same boat, what would you probably do?
 
  • Like
Reactions: hopebeat

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,157 Posts
Separate tip, I wouldn't list the company names and the exact positions - someone in the hiring process might be on PerC or stumble across it somehow, and it's usually best not to let people locate you like that.

I would say the first, especially if you can start paying off your loans with it. The second sounds soul crushing, hard to get promoted - which correlates with higher pay - and like you'd be burned out and quit within the year. Better to do a good job at something you like and get good references for later down the road. Plus, more free time means more friends means more networking, which means - again - better chance of better jobs in the future.

Also, there might be a pay negotiation process, like something where you let them know you have another offer for more and are wondering if they can come closer to matching because you really want to work at the company that pays less. Not sure what the policy is for that company in particular, but maybe something worth looking into?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
forget the four letter INFJ indicators. Forget about happiness if it doesn't lead you to your end goal. I have to remind people that not all life challenges evolve around personality traits. In fact, it comes down to perseverance and overcoming the immediate obstacles that will lead you quickest to your end goal.

You have you end goal- choose what will be the most direct route along with relative experience. #1 seems to be the one. 10k less can always be made up by picking up banquet server jobs on the weekends (example).

Don't sit and contemplate too much longer..

My personal experience- I suffered a pay cut from a cushy federal job in DC to move to Vegas. Pay is lower, but it's part of my end goal. I'm happier and will get to work overseas again with this job. Also, I'm building a foundation for property investment. So, did I leave a great prestigious job with benefits for a harder and more demanding in 110 degree weather? YOU BET..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
980 Posts
I have always only used any company to get enough experience to add to my CV so ultimately to move to another job with more money. I once took on a job just to be trained as a methadone dispenser, the pay was poor but I was fully trained after a month then applied to a different company with my now updated CV with "trained methadone dispenser” and got the new job double the money.

To Employ = To Use. You are not going to use me I will use you to get what I want

I would go this route. HR experience is very valuable and you seem to be edging down that road. You say “I have a psych degree, and ultimately I'd like to get the HR experience so I can apply for true HR jobs in the future. It's also much closer--maybe a 15-20 minute drive.”

Done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,723 Posts
The difference in pay between the two jobs is probably smaller than it seems, if you're in a country that does progressive taxation (I'm going to assume you're in the USA because of the absence of currency symbols ... so yeah. The USA does progressive taxation)

And the difference there is already pretty small to begin with (in my opinion).

I would pick the first one since the pay difference is so small and the commute is short, and commute time for me factors into my perception of how good the pay is. From starting to get ready in the morning to flopping down on my bean bag after work - that's how many hours I "worked" in my mind. And if the commute is long then the effective hourly rate is lower.

If the pay difference was a lot bigger (enough to make up for the commute and then more too on top of that) then I might be tempted to pick the higher paying one. Picking a higher paying job that you enjoy less doesn't always mean that enjoyment disappears from your life. Sometimes you bond with people at work even though the work itself sucks (or even because the work sucks). Sometimes a higher paying job puts you on a path to charge a higher rate per hour and then work fewer hours and have more free time to enjoy other things. So it's not always black and white.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,819 Posts
I would pick the higher pay for now and bite the bullet on inconvenience ... Then use the higher pay to beef up the resume and look for a job that makes me happier but at the same time have leverage to negotiate higher pay in that job.

It was a very successful strategy I employed when I was working. In fact, almost all of my fellow MBA colleagues did the same thing and everyone I know now is doing things they love after a decade removed from college. But it wasn't like they were unhappy just because they were doing things that weren't their dream jobs. I personally used the extra money to help me move to the States and start a small business. I worked shit tier jobs (but for amazing pay and benefits for 10 years) to be able to do that. Now I'm 36, debt-free and in a position to buy a home within the next couple of years.

Extra money is always better than giving it up for happiness because extra money does have a direct impact on things we can do to boost our happiness.

But that strategy may not work for everyone. It's an option however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,957 Posts
Well that depends. Do you value doing something you don't want to do so you can have more money to do what you want, or do you value doing what you want to have some money to sustain you doing what you want? Because the job the pays more could be a fund raiser for what you actually want to do, but at the same time you could just do something that you want to do and happen to get payed for it. Right?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top