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So I'm married now. And I feel like I'm starting from nowhere, Because for the past 5 years or so, I've been a vagabond of sorts ever since I graduated college with my nearly-useless Liberal Arts degree. Right now I can go any which direction... another state, another country, back to school-- I'm more of a jack-of-all-trades-master-of-none because I like lots of new experiences, I'm just trying to figure out the next experience I should have, and preferable a bit more stable since I'm married now.

I always like hearing from fellow infps about the jobs they do and like, and what makes it so likable.
 

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I really love my job as a stagehand. In my job I work in a wide variety of environments, indoors and out and can pick up work virtually anywhere. I get to build and support all manner of performances and expositions, trade shows etc. It is both highly technical and very creative, allowing me to work with my head, hands, and body. There are many disciplines in this profession, I typically do lighting and stage carpentry, requiring skills as an electrician and carpenter obviously, but also skills in climbing, machinery operation, logistics, and design. Theres an old stagehand joke, " what do you call a show without lights?....radio", I could take this a bit further and quip ,what do you call a show without stagehands?....Busking (street performance).
Its not glamorous, not usually, though I have built and stood on the same stage as acts ranging from Andreas Bocelli to ZZ Top, from the Rolling Stones to Kanye West and all manner of performers inbetween. This job isn't for everyone, in fact it has a huge attrition rate with new employees as many can't handle the demand it places on them, but I think its a wonderful way to earn some coin. I've worked in many different types of jobs over the years, this is the only one I've ever really loved.
 

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I work in retail (in the shoe department of a department store). I'm always busy with something. My job entails many different kinds of tasks and on-the-spot problem-solving. Retail is also a great job for befriending coworkers, because there's always some annoying experience to bond over. I like being helpful, being able to see what I've accomplished in a day, and being friends with my coworkers, so it's all kind of perfect for me.
 

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... teach piano, privately.

business is a little slow these days and I'm thinking of exploring other options. What's important for me is that I don't contradict who I am and what I stand for. Plus I want to have the freedom to refuse clients and only take students who want to become better musicians. There's nothing more disheartening than to teach someone who is forced by their parents. It's not only depressing to the child, but it also makes me feel used as an instrument of discipline.

Having to take commissions and completely change what you're about is discouraging in artistic fields. How many creative people call it quits because they feel the demands on their work are unreasonable? It's fine when you're asked to perform a specific role, or play a specific piece of music but I would have a problem when my work is used to sell a product or a service I oppose. I think I would be like Robert Pattinson trashing Twilight in every interview.

... it's not always about what I do, but who I work with and what my work accomplishes in the grand scheme of everything. No problem working at a nice cafe, or book store or a shop with quality goods. Big problem with working at a fast food dive responsible for clogging arteries by the million or at a holding company responsible for the foreclosure of many local homes and businesses. Maybe what isn't the only thing to consider.
 

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The jobs I've enjoyed the most are

1: Last year I worked for Disneyland Paris, as a ticket sales hostess, and a Voluntear ('ear' because it's a word play on Mickey his ears) VIP guide. This means that I worked with people in the most magical place on Earth. People come to the park to experience magic, and as an INFP who is often blamed to be to far away in a personal dream world, it means that people were moving from the Human World, to a World of Magic, which is my native terrain. It gave me the chance to perform magic, to make people happy, to help adults find magic in their own life again, and to be a listening ear for people who needed to rid themselves of emotional problems they were experiencing at that moment. Also working at the entrance made me the first and the last smile of the park, it was I and my co-workers that opened the gates and launched people into a day of magic and laughter, when not done correctly, people might have stayed grumpy for the rest of the day because of bad service at the entrance. I also helped people with the problems they experienced with their tickets, or if they had had a bad experience with other cast members then I (because we were the last cast members before the exit of the park) was there to listen, calm them, and if needed lead them to the place where they could officially file a complaint. As a Disney Voluntear I also worked with terminal ill children or bottom poor children and gave them amazing magical free tours in the park, so they could have ethereal magical memories, together with characters and parades exclusively organized for them. (in which often they could even perform themselves.)

Of course you might say that this is a weird job for an 'I' (introvert), but once you put on your costume and you leave backstage, you're on stage, you're a character, you're not you, you're a roll you play. So everything you do, and everything people do against you, are not against you as a person, but against the character you play. On top of that the Introvert is an energy giver, while extraverts are energy takers. By working at Disney I was capable of giving away positive energy and cheering people up, and then when my shift ended I would withdraw myself into my room, with a cup of tea and music, and kindled the flame that had weakened so much by warming others their hearts :)

2: For 6 months I worked as volunteer teacher in East Thailand. Here I had meaningful interaction with local people, while helping them with community work, teaching children English and setting up youth activities. It made it possible for me to bring to life ideals that had been in my head for years, which made me feel and realize that I wasn't only a person of words and ideals, but of action too, which was important for me to validate my own ideals.

3: Currently I'm a research assistant for an academical paper based in the North of Thailand. So I'm doing the field research up here, after which we'll analyze the data and write a paper with it. This gives me the chance to learn new things, interact, learn and communicate with isolated mountain tribes and write a paper which will influence future policy making in helping and protecting these people and their forests. So it gives me a chance to help people on a bigger scale :)
 

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2: For 6 months I worked as volunteer teacher in East Thailand. Here I had meaningful interaction with local people, while helping them with community work, teaching children English and setting up youth activities. It made it possible for me to bring to life ideals that had been in my head for years, which made me feel and realize that I wasn't only a person of words and ideals, but of action too, which was important for me to validate my own ideals.

3: Currently I'm a research assistant for an academical paper based in the North of Thailand. So I'm doing the field research up here, after which we'll analyze the data and write a paper with it. This gives me the chance to learn new things, interact, learn and communicate with isolated mountain tribes and write a paper which will influence future policy making in helping and protecting these people and their forests. So it gives me a chance to help people on a bigger scale :)
Sounds brilliant, way to go! :happy:
 

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... teach piano, privately.

business is a little slow these days and I'm thinking of exploring other options. What's important for me is that I don't contradict who I am and what I stand for. Plus I want to have the freedom to refuse clients and only take students who want to become better musicians. There's nothing more disheartening than to teach someone who is forced by their parents. It's not only depressing to the child, but it also makes me feel used as an instrument of discipline.

Having to take commissions and completely change what you're about is discouraging in artistic fields. How many creative people call it quits because they feel the demands on their work are unreasonable? It's fine when you're asked to perform a specific role, or play a specific piece of music but I would have a problem when my work is used to sell a product or a service I oppose. I think I would be like Robert Pattinson trashing Twilight in every interview.

... it's not always about what I do, but who I work with and what my work accomplishes in the grand scheme of everything. No problem working at a nice cafe, or book store or a shop with quality goods. Big problem with working at a fast food dive responsible for clogging arteries by the million or at a holding company responsible for the foreclosure of many local homes and businesses. Maybe what isn't the only thing to consider.
This resonates with me strongly, after I got out of the service people I know urged me to take a job with an oil company as I have training and experience with the systems they use. Then to go work for Halliburton as I could have made a lot of money as a contractor for them in Iraq. To have done either of these things however would have required me to abandon my ideals and values, to have betrayed what I think is the best part of who I am. I agree the "what" is only part of the question, the why is every bit as if not more important.
 

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I really love my job as a stagehand. In my job I work in a wide variety of environments, indoors and out and can pick up work virtually anywhere. I get to build and support all manner of performances and expositions, trade shows etc. It is both highly technical and very creative, allowing me to work with my head, hands, and body. There are many disciplines in this profession, I typically do lighting and stage carpentry, requiring skills as an electrician and carpenter obviously, but also skills in climbing, machinery operation, logistics, and design. Theres an old stagehand joke, " what do you call a show without lights?....radio", I could take this a bit further and quip ,what do you call a show without stagehands?....Busking (street performance).
Its not glamorous, not usually, though I have built and stood on the same stage as acts ranging from Andreas Bocelli to ZZ Top, from the Rolling Stones to Kanye West and all manner of performers inbetween. This job isn't for everyone, in fact it has a huge attrition rate with new employees as many can't handle the demand it places on them, but I think its a wonderful way to earn some coin. I've worked in many different types of jobs over the years, this is the only one I've ever really loved.
The Rolling St... wow. Just wow.

I don't mind handiwork, you know. I really don't. I actually prefer it to some extent.

I used to plant lettuce on my grandfather's farm when I was younger. I worked at the greenhouse. It wasn't hard work at all, you know, it wasn't even work as I saw it. I worked with the seedlings on those trays, all by myself, only listening to the birds singing and to my imagination running wild.



Then they would move them to the garden and I would just admire my babies.



It wasn't a job, you know. But I loved it all the same.
 

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People here (teachers, familly members, even people of my age) keep urging me to go to college, because according to them I have potential. But, hell, I just don't want to. I don't want to spend 3-5 years of my life preparing for something I don't even want to do. And I have seen all the courses offered in the nearest university and I just don't want to do any of them.

I suppose I love my freedom too much. I don't want to try and be a superstar or anything, I just want to have enough money, maybe working on a normal job, and then get home and pick up my guitar and just play to myself, or read my books, or listen to music. Or play with my cat. Just that. It sounds like an impossible dream as I write it, but I'm still optimistic. I can live rough (I have, to tell the truth, and did well by myself) and I won't have a family to support anytime soon, so I suppose I can dream a bit, right?

It's a funny thing, my wish for freedom extends to changing my name at will, and changing my appearance at will and living everywhere I feel like. It's this essential thing I for me. Can't explain it quite well.
 

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... teach piano, privately.

business is a little slow these days and I'm thinking of exploring other options. What's important for me is that I don't contradict who I am and what I stand for. Plus I want to have the freedom to refuse clients and only take students who want to become better musicians. There's nothing more disheartening than to teach someone who is forced by their parents. It's not only depressing to the child, but it also makes me feel used as an instrument of discipline.

Having to take commissions and completely change what you're about is discouraging in artistic fields. How many creative people call it quits because they feel the demands on their work are unreasonable? It's fine when you're asked to perform a specific role, or play a specific piece of music but I would have a problem when my work is used to sell a product or a service I oppose. I think I would be like Robert Pattinson trashing Twilight in every interview.

... it's not always about what I do, but who I work with and what my work accomplishes in the grand scheme of everything. No problem working at a nice cafe, or book store or a shop with quality goods. Big problem with working at a fast food dive responsible for clogging arteries by the million or at a holding company responsible for the foreclosure of many local homes and businesses. Maybe what isn't the only thing to consider.
Lol, I kind of pity Pattinson. Especially when I think he's probably an INFP as well, I imagine myself in his place. Not my thing :frustrating:

This is also a huge thing for me. Not only with jobs, but doing anything that goes against my values. My sister asked me to be her son's godfather, and I... I kind of said no. Didn't tell her, but I'm quite against introducing someone in a religion when said someone can't even speak yet.
 

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People here (teachers, familly members, even people of my age) keep urging me to go to college, because according to them I have potential. But, hell, I just don't want to. I don't want to spend 3-5 years of my life preparing for something I don't even want to do. And I have seen all the courses offered in the nearest university and I just don't want to do any of them.

I suppose I love my freedom too much. I don't want to try and be a superstar or anything, I just want to have enough money, maybe working on a normal job, and then get home and pick up my guitar and just play to myself, or read my books, or listen to music. Or play with my cat. Just that. It sounds like an impossible dream as I write it, but I'm still optimistic. I can live rough (I have, to tell the truth, and did well by myself) and I won't have a family to support anytime soon, so I suppose I can dream a bit, right?

It's a funny thing, my wish for freedom extends to changing my name at will, and changing my appearance at will and living everywhere I feel like. It's this essential thing I for me. Can't explain it quite well.
I never did graduate from the music faculty. Dropped out, or got expelled depending on who you ask. The truth is that it's been a few years and I don't know. Teaching piano is something that I've been doing as a business and only now in my thirties I'm open to the idea of studying business and marketing. This is not something I understood well in highschool, and I jumped to the irrational that studying business was to embrace the corporate lifestyle, its values or an expression of the unconscious desire to exploit people. Now I find it quite fascinating: and in some strange way liberating because I understand that I have a choice how to use this knowledge and for what purpose.

Point I'm trying to make is that perspectives change with experience. This isn't a question of age because there are teenagers who simply blow my mind, and people my age who sit around on their front stoop drinking beer and not interested in anything outside of television and their jobs. Your family and teachers may encourage you to go to college for their own private reasons. Yet their reasons are not the only reasons to go to college: you could meet a lot of interesting people your own age, you can find that you want to study something you never knew existed, you could go because it is such a different world and you're fascinated with the culture and wish to explore things. Being educated and branching out doesn't require you to forfeit what you believe in. On the contrary I felt I had to betray myself in situations when I was stubborn. Think T-S Eliot for a second: working as a bank teller allowed him to write the poetry he wanted to write without selling out on his poetry. Freedom exists in many forms.

... maybe this is where the E/I difference plays out because I don't pity Robert Pattinson. Filming Twilight and using the series to advocate what a healthy relationship is and show how Twilight is not a story of love but unhealthy dependency was a brilliant move. The people who watch the film watch the interviews making his juxtapositions very effective. He played his cards well. And, I really liked him in Cosmopolis: mind you, I'm a fan of both Don DeLillo's writing and David Cronenberg's films.
 

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I never did graduate from the music faculty. Dropped out, or got expelled depending on who you ask. The truth is that it's been a few years and I don't know. Teaching piano is something that I've been doing as a business and only now in my thirties I'm open to the idea of studying business and marketing. This is not something I understood well in highschool, and I jumped to the irrational that studying business was to embrace the corporate lifestyle, its values or an expression of the unconscious desire to exploit people. Now I find it quite fascinating: and in some strange way liberating because I understand that I have a choice how to use this knowledge and for what purpose.

Point I'm trying to make is that perspectives change with experience. This isn't a question of age because there are teenagers who simply blow my mind, and people my age who sit around on their front stoop drinking beer and not interested in anything outside of television and their jobs. Your family and teachers may encourage you to go to college for their own private reasons. Yet their reasons are not the only reasons to go to college: you could meet a lot of interesting people your own age, you can find that you want to study something you never knew existed, you could go because it is such a different world and you're fascinated with the culture and wish to explore things. Being educated and branching out doesn't require you to forfeit what you believe in. On the contrary I felt I had to betray myself in situations when I was stubborn. Think T-S Eliot for a second: working as a bank teller allowed him to write the poetry he wanted to write without selling out on his poetry. Freedom exists in many forms.

... maybe this is where the E/I difference plays out because I don't pity Robert Pattinson. Filming Twilight and using the series to advocate what a healthy relationship is and show how Twilight is not a story of love but unhealthy dependency was a brilliant move. The people who watch the film watch the interviews making his juxtapositions very effective. He played his cards well. And, I really liked him in Cosmopolis: mind you, I'm a fan of both Don DeLillo's writing and David Cronenberg's films.
:) Thank you for you reply. I really needed that. I do understand how college can be a wonderful place, but I'm terrified of studying, say, civil engineering for years and finding out that I hate it. Not that I'd say that I hate the thing, you know, but all those stories of people who have diplomas they consider useless now get to me. And I love the fact that I usually want to learn a lot of things, and if I want to learn something I never considered before I can. With books, internet, all of it.

I'm not however stubborn with my preferences, you know. Actually, one of the reasons for not wanting to commit to college is all the things I might find along the way and that I'd have to give up because I'm supposed to concentrate on becoming that professional. All the different lives I could live but I had to give up for something I wasn't even sure I wanted in the first place.

I actually imagine myself finding many other interests along the way and picking them up. It has been this way until now (and I'm still 17) and I doubt it'll change.

And I haven't thought about RPattinson that way. I guess it makes sense. But I wonder, if that was really his intention, if he regrets his decision when he sees the fangirls fawning over him instead of reflecting on bad relationships and their consequences.
 

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:) Thank you for you reply. I really needed that. I do understand how college can be a wonderful place, but I'm terrified of studying, say, civil engineering for years and finding out that I hate it. Not that I'd say that I hate the thing, you know, but all those stories of people who have diplomas they consider useless now get to me. And I love the fact that I usually want to learn a lot of things, and if I want to learn something I never considered before I can. With books, internet, all of it.

I'm not however stubborn with my preferences, you know. Actually, one of the reasons for not wanting to commit to college is all the things I might find along the way and that I'd have to give up because I'm supposed to concentrate on becoming that professional. All the different lives I could live but I had to give up for something I wasn't even sure I wanted in the first place.

I actually imagine myself finding many other interests along the way and picking them up. It has been this way until now (and I'm still 17) and I doubt it'll change.

And I haven't thought about RPattinson that way. I guess it makes sense. But I wonder, if that was really his intention, if he regrets his decision when he sees the fangirls fawning over him instead of reflecting on bad relationships and their consequences.
... there's things you might have to give up because you don't go to college. It works both ways and I'll play devil's advocate for getting a college education. The choice is yours in the end.

People who read your resume look at college education as a sign of maturity. The don't care about the particulars of your program because what they are interested are your character traits. They want to know that you are person they can count on, that you are a person who can rise above and is not afraid of learning. They want to know their candidate is somebody intelligent who responsible enough to do the work.

Granted, there are other ways to communicate this on your resume but a bachelors of anything also communicates this message. Because I didn't graduate my resume reads: Attended University of X, faculty of X. Also you can write what you wrote me: And I love the fact that I usually want to learn a lot of things, and if I want to learn something I never considered before I can. With books, internet, all of it. This can also be included on your resume.

... question, ever thought of taking classes part time? This way you can have the benefit of finishing a diploma and having time to pursue your personal interests outside the field you're studying.

... Robert P, not sure but he did make the best of a lousy situation. And the same fangirls are more likely to trust his opinion over a right wing preacher who thinks Twilight relationships are a good idea. I say he's making good use of his looks and popularity, and he is extremely good looking and popular. How people interpret his message is not within his scope of influence. I think he's very clear about what he believes.
 

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... there's things you might have to give up because you don't go to college. It works both ways and I'll play devil's advocate for getting a college education. The choice is yours in the end.

People who read your resume look at college education as a sign of maturity. The don't care about the particulars of your program because what they are interested are your character traits. They want to know that you are person they can count on, that you are a person who can rise above and is not afraid of learning. They want to know their candidate is somebody intelligent who responsible enough to do the work.

Granted, there are other ways to communicate this on your resume but a bachelors of anything also communicates this message. Because I didn't graduate my resume reads: Attended University of X, faculty of X. Also you can write what you wrote me: And I love the fact that I usually want to learn a lot of things, and if I want to learn something I never considered before I can. With books, internet, all of it. This can also be included on your resume.

... question, ever thought of taking classes part time? This way you can have the benefit of finishing a diploma and having time to pursue your personal interests outside the field you're studying.

... Robert P, not sure but he did make the best of a lousy situation. And the same fangirls are more likely to trust his opinion over a right wing preacher who thinks Twilight relationships are a good idea. I say he's making good use of his looks and popularity, and he is extremely good looking and popular. How people interpret his message is not within his scope of influence. I think he's very clear about what he believes.
I suppose in the end it doesn't matter what one chooses as long as they make the best of the situation they're in. Another thing I'm afraid of is devoting my time to it and then giving it all up.

I haven't really thought about taking classes, no.

I don't know but I sort of feel a certain inner hidden hatred for the system and this urge to rebel against it and live like a bohemian nomad. Like that movie Into the Wild. Not that I want to live like that guy though.

But I do think, a lot, before taking any decision like that in my life. At least when I get time ot think. I keep imagining, if, say, you, come to me and invite me to go to New Zealand to work with recycling. And that I had 5 minutes to pack my stuff. I'd go, depending on how well I knew you.

I get the impression you're trying to protect me from a depressing future, in which I get sick of my job, have no family, and sing to my cat at night. If so, thank you very much for your concern. :)


But I still think a lot about my future, you know. Not only what I want to do, but if I will be able to handle well certain situations or not. It usually involves a lot of introspection.

About you though, what would you have done differently? What decisions, if any, you did or did not take that is a cause of regret now?

And, if it's not asking too much, what would you do in my place? What decision would you take, and why?

As for Robert P... no that's too obvious, how about R Pattinson... yes that's good. About R Pattinson, I suppose only he knows, that is, if he is not confused himself. But if he tried to do that what you said, then he's got a good many points in my book.
 

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@Luke the Turner

Maybe I wasn't mature enough to do anything different at the time. My parents sent me to a Catholic school until the 8th grade, and we lived in the country when I was in high school. Let's not talk religious education or indoctrination of any sort. That gets me just about as evil as an Eskimo boy can be.

Choosing music was an act of rebellion against engineering and computer science. I believed that if I pushed myself and trained hard I will come out stronger and victorious. The consequences were harsh, had I made another choice I don't think I would be better off. If I could turn back time I would choose music, have everything shatter like it did, BUT I would choose walk away and move on instead of picking up the broken pieces. Success was the only world I knew, it was something that was beaten into me ever since I was a teenager. My sister was Ayn Rand's personal bitch.

I regretted many things because I was petty and foolish. We are talking and I'm giving everything a second thought: I regret nothing but overstaying my welcome. I learned how to see. I learned that a person's dignity is not measured by the size of their bank account and the degrees hanging from their wall. I'm comfortable shedding the skin of my upbringing.

... What if you drop out? You learned something. You met some people. You lived some life and experienced things you never thought possible. Following through is important, but so is knowing when to bail and start something new. In retrospect maybe failure was something that was best thing to ever happen to me.

Depression is giving up on yourself, taking life as a perpetual chore where everyday brings the same monotony, the same boredom and disgust that kills your motivation for change. I'm still working on the motivation aspect of my life but I'm able to enjoy playing piano again, I get to read awesome books and my family is starting to understand me.

(edit, there's such a thing as being over protective. The idea is to look, see what is and what could be and examine all the options available. Or maybe it's my Ne-dom bias for observation above everything.)

... Into the Wild. A part of me loves Christopher; part of me wants to take the yellow snow crystals and rub it into his beady little eyes with a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the citizens of Canarsie. He found love and a community that accepted him, offered him a home where he could live life according to his beliefs. There's idealism and there's martyrdom. The tragedy is that he could not see the difference between the two.

... have you read Camus' The Rebel by chance?
 
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@Luke the Turner

Maybe I wasn't mature enough to do anything different at the time. My parents sent me to a Catholic school until the 8th grade, and we lived in the country when I was in high school. Let's not talk religious education or indoctrination of any sort. That gets me just about as evil as an Eskimo boy can be.

Choosing music was an act of rebellion against engineering and computer science. I believed that if I pushed myself and trained hard I will come out stronger and victorious. The consequences were harsh, had I made another choice I don't think I would be better off. If I could turn back time I would choose music, have everything shatter like it did, BUT I would choose walk away and move on instead of picking up the broken pieces. Success was the only world I knew, it was something that was beaten into me ever since I was a teenager. My sister was Ayn Rand's personal bitch.

I regretted many things because I was petty and foolish. We are talking and I'm giving everything a second thought: I regret nothing but overstaying my welcome. I learned how to see. I learned that a person's dignity is not measured by the size of their bank account and the degrees hanging from their wall. I'm comfortable shedding the skin of my upbringing.

... What if you drop out? You learned something. You met some people. You lived some life and experienced things you never thought possible. Following through is important, but so is knowing when to bail and start something new. In retrospect maybe failure was something that was best thing to ever happen to me.

Depression is giving up on yourself, taking life as a perpetual chore where everyday brings the same monotony, the same boredom and disgust that kills your motivation for change. I'm still working on the motivation aspect of my life but I'm able to enjoy playing piano again, I get to read awesome books and my family is starting to understand me.

(edit, there's such a thing as being over protective. The idea is to look, see what is and what could be and examine all the options available. Or maybe it's my Ne-dom bias for observation above everything.)

... Into the Wild. A part of me loves Christopher; part of me wants to take the yellow snow crystals and rub it into his beady little eyes with a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the citizens of Canarsie. He found love and a community that accepted him, offered him a home where he could live life according to his beliefs. There's idealism and there's martyrdom. The tragedy is that he could not see the difference between the two.

... have you read Camus' The Rebel by chance?

First of all, I would like to say that this is an amazing conversation.

I won't mention religious education, after all I live in the country as well and in my school we were supposed to pray everyday. And everybody did. Except for one boy, around 17, that seemed to like to clean his nails exactly when it was time to pray. I wonder who that one might be. :ninja:

I almost flunked this year because of absence. They were passing the limits.

But I won't mention it. :p

What sort of consequences were harsh?

....And if I don't even go? I'll learn things, I'll meet people and experience things I never thought possible. Accomplishments are important, preparations and precautions are important, but so is knowing if it's better to go off the beaten path and do your own thing.

That being said, I have a profession in my mind (which I prefer not to say for reasons I can't still comprehend). I have something I actually work towards to. I don't work to achieve absolute success, but I work because it is something I love working on. It makes me relaxed and full of energy. Yet I see that that's just about your relationship with playing the piano. And I'm really scared to do something wrong. So, what shattered in music for you? Of course that if you don't want to answer, you really just have to ignore it.

I haven't read The Rebel. I've been reading Nietzsche. Crazy shit. Sometimes I laugh a bit with it. "Man will be Superman! Woman... uh... will give birth to the Superman!"
 

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First of all, I would like to say that this is an amazing conversation.

I won't mention religious education, after all I live in the country as well and in my school we were supposed to pray everyday. And everybody did. Except for one boy, around 17, that seemed to like to clean his nails exactly when it was time to pray. I wonder who that one might be. :ninja:

I almost flunked this year because of absence. They were passing the limits.

But I won't mention it. :p

What sort of consequences were harsh?

....And if I don't even go? I'll learn things, I'll meet people and experience things I never thought possible. Accomplishments are important, preparations and precautions are important, but so is knowing if it's better to go off the beaten path and do your own thing.

That being said, I have a profession in my mind (which I prefer not to say for reasons I can't still comprehend). I have something I actually work towards to. I don't work to achieve absolute success, but I work because it is something I love working on. It makes me relaxed and full of energy. Yet I see that that's just about your relationship with playing the piano. And I'm really scared to do something wrong. So, what shattered in music for you? Of course that if you don't want to answer, you really just have to ignore it.

I haven't read The Rebel. I've been reading Nietzsche. Crazy shit. Sometimes I laugh a bit with it. "Man will be Superman! Woman... uh... will give birth to the Superman!"
... consequences? What hurt most is feeling betrayed by friends. There were incidents I had with the campus police and I did have to sign a one year trespassing ban, I declared a personal war to prove myself and lost. This when I should have packed my bags and transfered to another university and studied languages, literature or media studies. Like I said before, knowing when to cut loses.

What shattered music? I felt I was a commodity to be passed around between professors and visiting teachers for the purpose of taking my money, while they were feeding me an unrealistic dream. I felt I was in a monastery where I'm expected to pray before the holy trinity of Bach, Beethoven and Brahms and practice emotional self flagellation in a practice room and feel grateful that some conceited idiot gives me an hour of his time to tell me what I should like, and how I should interpret a piece without giving me anything that is actually useful. That said, I became very bitter and mean in that environment but I also felt stuck.

I still think college makes life easier because it gets you notices and it gives you bargaining capital and access to a good position. If there's something you want to try, go for it. I was 21 in first year: I didn't go straight after high school and I'm glad I didn't because I didn't have as much debt as some of my classmates. I'm 36 and there are people my age who are retraining or doing their first degree. There are people who get divorced only to find their perfect love the second time around. Tell me something, what's wrong with screwing up? I wish I understood this when I was younger, I wish I wasn't consumed fear to ask this question. But what's wrong with screwing up.

There are men my age having strokes and heart attacks because they are consumed with stress, or they have no life and interests outside work, yet they are seen as the icons of success. That person we place on a pedestal might beat his kids, shoot heroin and have a wife with her personal bedroom in a shopping mall. But he's a successful businessman and that's all we ever see.

I cant remember the exact detail, but there's a part in Zarathustra where he rejects his own spirituality in favor of the self made man and falls into madness. And for someone who wrote God is dead, Nietzsche spends a lot of time talking about religion and reinventing morality. Camus talks about rebellion as an affirmation of personal existence, standing up for what you believe in and putting everything that calls for the renunciation of life and self into question. He'll also tell you that life is meaningless and convince you that it's precious and worth living. (I read 2 of his novels, and numerous essays. I cant cite everything)

... just curious, how do you (and others too) think about money? Do you think it's weird to think of it as a relationship requiring mutual respect?
 

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... consequences? What hurt most is feeling betrayed by friends. There were incidents I had with the campus police and I did have to sign a one year trespassing ban, I declared a personal war to prove myself and lost. This when I should have packed my bags and transfered to another university and studied languages, literature or media studies. Like I said before, knowing when to cut loses.

What shattered music? I felt I was a commodity to be passed around between professors and visiting teachers for the purpose of taking my money, while they were feeding me an unrealistic dream. I felt I was in a monastery where I'm expected to pray before the holy trinity of Bach, Beethoven and Brahms and practice emotional self flagellation in a practice room and feel grateful that some conceited idiot gives me an hour of his time to tell me what I should like, and how I should interpret a piece without giving me anything that is actually useful. That said, I became very bitter and mean in that environment but I also felt stuck.

I still think college makes life easier because it gets you notices and it gives you bargaining capital and access to a good position. If there's something you want to try, go for it. I was 21 in first year: I didn't go straight after high school and I'm glad I didn't because I didn't have as much debt as some of my classmates. I'm 36 and there are people my age who are retraining or doing their first degree. There are people who get divorced only to find their perfect love the second time around. Tell me something, what's wrong with screwing up? I wish I understood this when I was younger, I wish I wasn't consumed fear to ask this question. But what's wrong with screwing up.

There are men my age having strokes and heart attacks because they are consumed with stress, or they have no life and interests outside work, yet they are seen as the icons of success. That person we place on a pedestal might beat his kids, shoot heroin and have a wife with her personal bedroom in a shopping mall. But he's a successful businessman and that's all we ever see.

I cant remember the exact detail, but there's a part in Zarathustra where he rejects his own spirituality in favor of the self made man and falls into madness. And for someone who wrote God is dead, Nietzsche spends a lot of time talking about religion and reinventing morality. Camus talks about rebellion as an affirmation of personal existence, standing up for what you believe in and putting everything that calls for the renunciation of life and self into question. He'll also tell you that life is meaningless and convince you that it's precious and worth living. (I read 2 of his novels, and numerous essays. I cant cite everything)

... just curious, how do you (and others too) think about money? Do you think it's weird to think of it as a relationship requiring mutual respect?
I don't think there is anything wrong with screwing up. Although I don't especially like it, I think that if even if you do screw up, there are many other possibilities to consider, there are many other ways to be successful.

The whole thing about not measuring someone's character by their bank accounts has, as long as I can remember (and especially since I turned 15), been a huge part of my personal philosophy. I don't really know how to measure character or a how to define a "worthy" life, but money doesn't often enter the equation. It doesn't matter if you're a billionaire or if you have no money at all, I just don't tend to consider it.

I heard about Nietzche a lot before actually get to read him (not different from most people, I believe) and I can't really say, considering how much I read, that I'm one of his fans. I've never read any book by Camus, but he seems to be a man after my own heart, by what you described (make up your own meaning!).

I see money as a tool, really. I'd like to have enough to be able to sleep well at night and to provide for the future without worrying much, but I don't know what I'd do if I had loads of it. I also see it as a way to pursue my own passions. I don't like people who don't like people who spend a lot though. If they earned it, I suppose they have that right.

What do you mean mutual respect?
[sorry if it's an obvious question :rolleyes:]

What teenagers usually say when they blow your mind? You got me curious. :confused:
 
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