Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It perplexes me that people can be proud to have been born in whatever country. Happiness due to this fact I can understand but its not like you actually achieved anything being born wherever.

Anyone out there able to explain to me what makes people think like this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Maybe what people want to actually express is their connection to that specific place because they not only were born there but also grew up in that place.

So they adapted to the culture there, too, and therefore feel a certain pride for their homeland.

You probably won't hear "I'm proud of being born in place X on a stop during a trip from place Y to Z" for that reason.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TurquoiseSunset

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,020 Posts
The fact that I was born in Australia means nothing to me.
 

·
Administrator
INTJ - ILI - 8w9 - Libtard
Joined
·
22,564 Posts
I am marginally better off saying I was born in Melbourne and not Tas....they say we have two heads here.

I am not patriotic. I am glad that I wasn't born in any third world or wartorn countries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
946 Posts
Patriotism sucks.
I'd say it depends on the context. Some of it is just group-think. But, do people ever really say "I'm proud to be Ecuadorian? ... I'm proud to be a Syrian? No, because either the government is oppressive or inept, and everyone's given up the will to make it better. So anyone who wants to accomplish something with their lives ends up fleeing to another country.

I can't say I'm proud to have been born an American, as I don't believe I had much say in the matter (though who knows, we may have). But, can I say I'm proud to be an American? On a personal level, yes.. I believe I can.

This country was founded on the values of individualism and individual achievement (among other important things), which is something I can agree with wholeheartedly (and I think many INTJ's would). I'm not particularly fond of what my country has been transforming into, so I do get involved in the opposition. I am proud of the efforts I have made so far, and will make more and more efforts in the future.

Now, I view "love" to mean that you strive to help something or someone grow, not the "I'm happy soandso does so much for me" line of reasoning. I guess my question to you is, in that context, why don't you give a crap about your countries?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Now, I view "love" to mean that you strive to help something or someone grow, not the "I'm happy soandso does so much for me" line of reasoning. I guess my question to you is, in that context, why don't you give a crap about your countries?
Because being born on this side of a line drawn in dirt shouldn't be important in my life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
Because being born on this side of a line drawn in dirt shouldn't be important in my life.
But unfortunately, when it comes to working or going to school or living a life on the other side of that line, it is very, VERY important. Even if the people on the other side of that line have the same culture and language as your side of the line, the truth of the matter is, you were born on your side of the line and "don't belong" on the other side (unless you fill out a shrimp-boat sized load of papers, appeal to the right bureaucrats and wait a long time...then finally you can get a sticker put on a piece of fancy paper in a fancy book with your side of the line's fancy emblem on the front and be "officially" accepted).

Ew...it just reeks of arbitrary. :tongue:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
I can't say I'm proud to have been born an American, as I don't believe I had much say in the matter (though who knows, we may have). But, can I say I'm proud to be an American? On a personal level, yes.. I believe I can.

This country was founded on the values of individualism and individual achievement (among other important things), which is something I can agree with wholeheartedly (and I think many INTJ's would). I'm not particularly fond of what my country has been transforming into, so I do get involved in the opposition. I am proud of the efforts I have made so far, and will make more and more efforts in the future.

Now, I view "love" to mean that you strive to help something or someone grow, not the "I'm happy soandso does so much for me" line of reasoning. I guess my question to you is, in that context, why don't you give a crap about your countries?
Scratched the first paragraph...

If you would like to focus on country, why not focus onto the overall mental health of the people that make this country? If you would ask me which is a bigger problem, "Where this country is heading or how many people are going to die due to certain ideals?" I will choose the latter part of that question.

The mentality that has become of the USA is that it idolizes certain ways of living rather than focusing on improving and change for the future with EVERYONE included. The country is always segregated into topics of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, sports, and political affiliation. Don't people have better past times instead of point fingers at one another? Why not spend the time volunteering or doing something for your town or city like offering a hand to rebuild infrastructure as a WHOLE GROUP.

Hopefully, because you're an INTJ, you will spend your brain power thinking about these issues, whether the love for one's country is more important than improving the general mental health of the population? Remember people make the country, not the other way around. If you want to empower the country, start with mentally uniting the very divided American people. At this point in time, I don't even know if this is possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
I was born in a country my family left after 3 months. Since then I've spent more than half my life living outside where I'm nominally from. I can appreciate the desire to say you're proud to identify with some nation, but in my case not the one of my birth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
I dislike the government I was born under. As for the country, the arbitrary lines on a map splitting up bits of dirt... I just don't want to live in the middle of a desert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
It's just another way to feel superior to other people. I'm from New Zealand and people are always like 'oh I love your country' which makes me feel sort of good, but there are horrible places and horrible people here like any other country. It's nice though when our country achieves more than just having lots of trees, because we love underdogs and that's how we see our country globally. Very unifying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
I don't feel any special connection to my place of birth. The world is my oyster. I have noticed a trend among the people I grew up with: there seems to be a definite correlation between how far they went geographically and how far they came in life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
It perplexes me that people can be proud to have been born in whatever country. Happiness due to this fact I can understand but its not like you actually achieved anything being born wherever.

Anyone out there able to explain to me what makes people think like this?
What they really mean to say is that they are proud to be part of a certain group. Being born into a group is the strongest connection people can feel. It's like family. (for many people that's really important.) It's something that can't be taken away, no matter what you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
I suppose it's also an easy crutch to make sure you don't have to develop your own opinion, ethics, etc. A bit like how many people treat religion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
In my case, it's not that I myself am proud to be a Canadian by birth. Rather, I'm proud to be third-generation Canadian. Third-generation, because that means my family of birth has pretty well established itself in its new homeland.
If I had to emigrate to the United States today and stay there till the day I die, I would probably keep a recognizably "Canadian" accent for as long as I could speak. Also, I would probably not be able to resolve some of the culture shock I might feel about various aspects of living in the US of A.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top