Personality Cafe banner

Do you agree with the ideas presented in this thread?

  • Yes, I like the idea

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I want more evidence

    Votes: 4 80.0%
  • No, uninterested

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • Are certain disorders caused by decisions improperly made in time?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
INFJ, SoCom, hands-on, physical intimacy, Energy being, Project Career Temp, Wisdom Growth Temp
Joined
·
4,018 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Decisions influence actions. People can follow decisions they have made in the past, the present, or future. Past decisions, that determine future course, allow people to function normally when enacted upon. Decisions determined in "every waking moment or present", as well as from "what-could-happen" scenarios often lead to the malfunctioning of an individual. This thread discusses how time influences decision making, which in turn affects individual actions either positively or negatively.

Goal-oriented or Driven Individuals (normal): Decisions made in the past, actions required in the future

These individuals often decide what they will do throughout the day, usually by the time they finish breakfast, or before work. They then act upon what they have decided. The results often lead to success in life, through the completion of goals and a feeling of achievement.

Individuals Suffering from Depression (inability to function normally): Decisions made in the present, actions required in the present

People suffering from depression feel they have no motivation to do anything. They often describe it as living "moment-to-moment", when every minute feels like a struggle. The decisions are made about what to do in the present, or the moment that it is happening. This often happens due to overworking, or over-analyzing internal feelings and needs. Actions are called for the moment decisions are made.

Individuals Suffering from Compulsive Disorders (hoarders of animals and materials; compulsive gamers or gamblers): Decisions made in the future by what could happen, actions required in the present

Hoarders and compulsive gamblers ask what could happen if they did not do something, so their decisions are based on possible future events. A hoarder will ask what would happen to the stray cat if nobody else saves it, or what would happen if they throw away something and never find it again. Similarly, a gambler asks what would happen if the dice is rolled again, or be worried that if he leaves the table now, he might not win next time. A person addicted to games questions whether they will be allowed to play next time, or wonder when they could play again. People who follow decisions made by possible events in the future, often find themselves uncomfortable with the present, so they act compulsively to ease inner anxiety.

What are your opinions on this? Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Interesting idea, but I can't think I've ever seen any evidence that there is a significant difference in the time focus of the decision making between these different groups of people. It seems like it might be an observable difference if you very selectively chose how you defined the groups, and limited the decision subset.

What about normal lazy people?
What about people making lots of decisions that are necessarily making lots of "right now" decisions?
etc, etc

So many confounding factors that suspect this would be impossible to show even if it was true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I do not completely diagree with you. However, I think its important not to catogorize people with mental health problems, as the personal story behind the problem matters the most. This is my opinion. What does the person having the problem feel the problem is caused by? It might be overanalyzing the moment, for person depressed as you said. But I feel it can also be regretting something in the past or thinking possible future scenarios in negative ways. No one knows one better than one self, so figuring the solution out with someone can be solution itself. Can it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,689 Posts
A lot of ESTP's and ESFP's don't plan our days. I have a couple of commitments, but no real plan. And I'm happy.


I don't agree with your premise.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top