Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The first time I took an IQ test I was about 14 years old and I scored a 122, give or take a couple points. I scored a 640 on the math portion of my SAT when I was about 16. I'm stating these just for measurable purposes. My problem when I was younger was I could not answer the most complex questions, I always got confused while trying to answer the hardest questions and got stuck.

Now, at age 18, my IQ has gone from a 122 to a solid 145. You may think that number is outrageous, which it is, but I was tested at that. My math SAT score went from a 640 to a 800. When I approached old questions that used to stump me because I simply could not make any sense of it were seen in an entirely new light. Suddenly, the solution just became crystal clear. Complex problems were no longer an issue for me randomly. Everything just started becoming more clear, and everything just started making more sense.

The main thing that improved my IQ was constantly being exposed to complex information, and having someone with a high IQ explain it to me. The way they explained things changed my style of thought. Essentially, I was mimicking them in a "fake it til you make it" style. I now would break complex information into smaller pieces, and then connect them altogether at the end to form a solution. Not only that, but I focused on developing one of my personality functions (Ni) by simply understanding it more but that's an entirely different subject. I also stopped thinking out loud and pausing my thought process to make sure everything makes sense, instead I just followed my gut on all decisions. I can no longer explain most of my reasoning to someone else, it usually takes me a while to backtrack my thought process. I USED to explain my thought process to myself, which ended up in just me getting confused in the middle of problem solving so I stopped doing that.

Now, the argument here could be that my IQ did not increase, but the innate IQ I possess revealed itself because I altered my mindset. However, I don't understand how the change could be so drastic in just 2 years. Something had to improve it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
Yes thanks to recent developments

You can increase your intelligence: 5 ways to maximize your cognitive potential - Scientific American Blog Network

Many will rush to state that IQ is meaningless despite evidence that income is correlated to the Intelligence Quotient The incredible correlation between IQ & income | Pumpkin Person. With extreme high IQ individuals, I theorize that other characteristics (EQ, determination, etc.) need to be strengthen as well so their intelligence can be honed into productive channels (inventing, conducting research).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes thanks to recent developments

You can increase your intelligence: 5 ways to maximize your cognitive potential - Scientific American Blog Network

Many will rush to state that IQ is meaningless despite evidence that income is correlated to the Intelligence Quotient The incredible correlation between IQ & income | Pumpkin Person. With extreme high IQ individuals, I theorize that other characteristics (EQ, determination, etc.) need to be strengthen as well so their intelligence can be honed into productive channels (inventing, conducting research).
I think IQ certainly means something. With that power to solve problems, imagine the things you can invent.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,124 Posts
Not an NT, but someone who jumps at any article about increasing intelligence. :p

I can never find a straight answer: some say yes, it can change. Others say it's fixed at birth - one major argument for it being fixed is that someone born mentally deficient cannot become average, let alone above that. Also, consider the simple fact that intelligence is genetic. You can improve performance, but not raw ability.

The effects of environment are hardly to be underestimated though: I experienced a similar SAT score improvement after switching to a better school; my thinking got several times more intricate and 'deep' when I started frequenting PerC and certain behaviors are just habit now. However, I'm a little skeptical of what this means. I see my newfound depth of thought as artificial, the scores were mere coincidence. In your case, you also saw improvements to IQ score, over one standard deviation. I'm inclined to think that was a problem of the test, or the first attempt was an off day.

Trust me, I wish increasing IQ was a thing - I'd be all over that.

Oh, and @Grandalf, the n-back test was debunked. It doesn't do crap except make you good at the n-back test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Not an NT, but someone who jumps at any article about increasing intelligence. :p

I can never find a straight answer: some say yes, it can change. Others say it's fixed at birth - one major argument for it being fixed is that someone born mentally deficient cannot become average, let alone above that. Also, consider the simple fact that intelligence is genetic. You can improve performance, but not raw ability.

The effects of environment are hardly to be underestimated though: I experienced a similar SAT score improvement after switching to a better school; my thinking got several times more intricate and 'deep' when I started frequenting PerC and certain behaviors are just habit now. However, I'm a little skeptical of what this means. I see my newfound depth of thought as artificial, the scores were mere coincidence. In your case, you also saw improvements to IQ score, over one standard deviation. I'm inclined to think that was a problem of the test, or the first attempt was an off day.

Trust me, I wish increasing IQ was a thing - I'd be all over that.

Oh, and @Grandalf, the n-back test was debunked. It doesn't do crap except make you good at the n-back test.
You are certainly correct. I think my IQ improved because I improved my style of thought, I think prior to my high results I was not performing to the best of my ability due to errors in my thought process. However, after correcting them, I am scoring near my full potential now.
 
Joined
·
9,999 Posts
We're not fully developed at 16. I'd wait until 20 or so before settling for a benchmark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
Yes. If you use your brain, you're increasing and strengthening the connections between your neurons, thus your brain will work faster to solve similar problems. Is there an innate ability to better use your brain? Yes, but it doesn't mean you can't improve it. Unless there's a really good reason for impeding said growth (some kind of disease/condition/birth defect).
 
  • Like
Reactions: lNTJ

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
teach me your ways
Cool username, just like mine lol. I think the best piece of advice I can give is look up explanations of IQ questions. You can start to mimic their thought process until it is so ingrained that you naturally think that way.


We're not fully developed at 16. I'd wait until 20 or so before settling for a benchmark.
That's interesting. That means I can continue to develop, which is just awesome.


Yes. If you use your brain, you're increasing and strengthening the connections between your neurons, thus your brain will work faster to solve similar problems. Is there an innate ability to better use your brain? Yes, but it doesn't mean you can't improve it. Unless there's a really good reason for impeding said growth (some kind of disease/condition/birth defect).
That means anyone can increase their IQ with dedication and effort.

Transorbital lobotomies should work just fine for that.
Witty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
@INTJ Yes, I believe that is what I said. One of the biggest problems in our society is the obsession with "smartness." You tell a kid that they are not smart when they are young and they believe it is an inherent trait. They feel like there is nothing to be done about it since they were born that way. No. A kid who may be doing below average when younger, if he has the will and puts in the effort, can very well do above average later in life. Vice versa, I know child prodigies who have heard phrases like "Oh, you're so smart!" and "Wow, you're such a genius" early in life and they believe it is an inherent trait. They no longer put in the effort to cultivate their talents because they believe it is something they are born with. Also not true. 'Smartness' is the same as athleticism or any other skill set out there. Some people are born better at it, but everyone can improve.
 

·
Registered
INTJ 5w4 Sx/Sp
Joined
·
2,370 Posts
Before about age 20 or so, when brain plasticity is pretty much settled, you can increase your IQ; after that, no. But you can practice doing IQ-tests and score marginally better results that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,860 Posts
@INTJ Yes, I believe that is what I said. One of the biggest problems in our society is the obsession with "smartness." You tell a kid that they are not smart when they are young and they believe it is an inherent trait. They feel like there is nothing to be done about it since they were born that way. No. A kid who may be doing below average when younger, if he has the will and puts in the effort, can very well do above average later in life. Vice versa, I know child prodigies who have heard phrases like "Oh, you're so smart!" and "Wow, you're such a genius" early in life and they believe it is an inherent trait. They no longer put in the effort to cultivate their talents because they believe it is something they are born with. Also not true. 'Smartness' is the same as athleticism or any other skill set out there. Some people are born better at it, but everyone can improve.
Are you familiar with entity and incremental theories of intelligence?

https://peopletriggers.wordpress.com/2014/05/28/do-we-become-smarter-entity-vs-incremental-intelligence/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
I haven't heard it called that before, but yes, I'm familiar with the idea. Somewhat off tangent, I think GT programs are great for kids that hit the ground running early in life, but it also makes it harder for those kids who don't get in. They think "Oh, I'm not gifted, and I will never be gifted." If you look at the kids in most GT programs, they're the kids whose parents give a shit and help them study to get in. These GT programs usually claim to use "IQ" tests for screening, but that obviously cannot be the case if kids can study for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,860 Posts
I haven't heard it called that before, but yes, I'm familiar with the idea. Somewhat off tangent, I think GT programs are great for kids that hit the ground running early in life, but it also makes it harder for those kids who don't get in. They think "Oh, I'm not gifted, and I will never be gifted." If you look at the kids in most GT programs, they're the kids whose parents give a shit and help them study to get in. These GT programs usually claim to use "IQ" tests for screening, but that obviously cannot be the case if kids can study for them.
Lol. I was in one of those for elementary school and it felt like it was mostly show so the adults can have a circle jerk about how smart their kids are. Then if their standardized test scores didn't reflect that, they'd get all anal and project that onto the students. "Oh you got a high 3 on reading comprehension but we really wanted you to get a 4. It's okay though, you were just below the cutoff for a 4" (principal told my parents that. a girl in my class was actually crying because she had a 3 on the math one..)

I'm not just bitching though. I have also heard they've done studies on this, and gifted kids are more likely to fit with entity than incremental theory, perhaps because they're told how smart they are all the time. So when they don't do well on something they figure it's because they're stupid.
 

·
Beer Guardian
ENTP 5w6 So/Sx 584 ILE Honorary INTJ
Joined
·
16,011 Posts
@INTJ

You just developed the cognitive skills needed to score better on the test. Cognitive development doesn't stop until you are 25-30. Being intelligent on paper isn't the end-all. It's what you do with it that really matters.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lNTJ

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,256 Posts
IQ is bullshit, imo.

I took one of those non-verbal pattern IQ tests awhile back and got like 133 or something. LMFAO.

I am actually an idiot. I have too many 'blonde' moments, I fail to follow simple instructions/rules, I got shitty grades, I have horrific grammar, and I just can't function in a conventional environment. If anything I'm probably below average.

Actually, I don't even know how to 'define' such a thing. I highly doubt a test can accurately measure ones true ability, intelligence, and creativity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
The first time I took an IQ test I was about 14 years old and I scored a 122, give or take a couple points. I scored a 640 on the math portion of my SAT when I was about 16. I'm stating these just for measurable purposes. My problem when I was younger was I could not answer the most complex questions, I always got confused while trying to answer the hardest questions and got stuck.

Now, at age 18, my IQ has gone from a 122 to a solid 145. You may think that number is outrageous, which it is, but I was tested at that. My math SAT score went from a 640 to a 800. When I approached old questions that used to stump me because I simply could not make any sense of it were seen in an entirely new light. Suddenly, the solution just became crystal clear. Complex problems were no longer an issue for me randomly. Everything just started becoming more clear, and everything just started making more sense.

The main thing that improved my IQ was constantly being exposed to complex information, and having someone with a high IQ explain it to me. The way they explained things changed my style of thought. Essentially, I was mimicking them in a "fake it til you make it" style. I now would break complex information into smaller pieces, and then connect them altogether at the end to form a solution. Not only that, but I focused on developing one of my personality functions (Ni) by simply understanding it more but that's an entirely different subject. I also stopped thinking out loud and pausing my thought process to make sure everything makes sense, instead I just followed my gut on all decisions. I can no longer explain most of my reasoning to someone else, it usually takes me a while to backtrack my thought process. I USED to explain my thought process to myself, which ended up in just me getting confused in the middle of problem solving so I stopped doing that.

Now, the argument here could be that my IQ did not increase, but the innate IQ I possess revealed itself because I altered my mindset. However, I don't understand how the change could be so drastic in just 2 years. Something had to improve it.
Things can be incredibly difficult to figure out. But once you have and understand it, it's not all that difficult. In those 2 years you have been going to school, right? You have learned many things and also (perhaps without really being aware of it) you've learned how to solve problems.

IQ goes up with age, but only if you keep learning new things. It's not about remembering answers and questions. It's about understanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
IQ is bullshit, imo.

I took one of those non-verbal pattern IQ tests awhile back and got like 133 or something. LMFAO.

I am actually an idiot. I have too many 'blonde' moments, I fail to follow simple instructions/rules, I got shitty grades, I have horrific grammar, and I just can't function in a conventional environment. If anything I'm probably below average.

Actually, I don't even know how to 'define' such a thing. I highly doubt a test can accurately measure ones true ability, intelligence, and creativity.
Yes, your post is a clear example of how horrific your grammar is.

IQ measures your ability to predict the future. Not self-esteme.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Yes, your post is a clear example of how horrific your grammar is.

IQ measures your ability to predict the future. Not self-esteme.
I've actually thought that once- IQ does seem to be your ability to predict the future. I kind of feel like it is also your ability to come to the right conclusion. Interesting.


Things can be incredibly difficult to figure out. But once you have and understand it, it's not all that difficult. In those 2 years you have been going to school, right? You have learned many things and also (perhaps without really being aware of it) you've learned how to solve problems.

IQ goes up with age, but only if you keep learning new things. It's not about remembering answers and questions. It's about understanding.
I agree. Perhaps my understanding of the world has became deeper, making it easier for me to solve small problems like an IQ test problem. Education may have certainly had a factor on my improvement.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top