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I saw this on the INTJ form and the idea made me really excited! I love reading and finding a good book can sometimes prove challenging, so this seemed like a good idea to me. Write down a few books you thoroughly enjoyed and of course read others suggestions! I hope we will accumulate a nice list of books, preferably ones most INFJs can enjoy. :kitteh:

I'll start.

Eli The Good by Silas House
A book I initially intended only as a filler between some heavier reading has turned into one of my favorite books of all time! For me Eli, a 10 year old boy, is a very relatable character. He is contemplative and really wants to understand the world around him. A great coming of age book!

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Is definitely a classic. The sorrow and joy throughout this book really make it feel real.

The Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry
I have no words for this series! But I will say that it is also a favorite of an INFJ friend of mine, so maybe it's a good series for INFJs to check out.

The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
A marvelous book filled with childhood struggles, love, loss and so much more! Truly captivating from the first page!

I will surly add more to the list at a later date, but I want to hear your suggestions as I am looking for something to read as I just finished several works of C. S. Lewis (one of my favorite authors) and Eli The Good.
 

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Great thread! I own nearly 200 books, so choosing a few favourites will be a bit hard for me, but here goes. I'll post a synopsis of each book from the Goodreads website:

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Barcelona, 1945: A city slowly heals in the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War, and Daniel, an antiquarian book dealer’s son who mourns the loss of his mother, finds solace in a mysterious book entitled The Shadow of the Wind, by one Julián Carax. But when he sets out to find the author’s other works, he makes a shocking discovery: someone has been systematically destroying every copy of every book Carax has written. In fact, Daniel may have the last of Carax’s books in existence. Soon Daniel’s seemingly innocent quest opens a door into one of Barcelona’s darkest secrets--an epic story of murder, madness, and doomed love.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

In The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera tells the story of a young woman in love with a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing and one of his mistresses and her humbly faithful lover. This magnificent novel juxtaposes geographically distant places; brilliant and playful reflections; and a variety of styles to take its place as perhaps the major achievement of one of the world’s truly great writers.

Lovely, Dark and Deep by Amy McNamara

Since the night of the crash, Wren Wells has been running away. Though she lived through the accident that killed her boyfriend Patrick, the girl she used to be didn’t survive. Instead of heading off to college as planned, Wren retreats to her father’s studio in the far-north woods of Maine. Somewhere she can be alone. Then she meets Cal Owen. Dealing with his own troubles, Cal’s hiding out too. When the chemistry between them threatens to pull Wren from her hard-won isolation, Wren has to choose: risk opening her broken heart to the world again, or join the ghosts who haunt her.

The Plum Tree by Ellen Marie Wiseman

A deeply moving and masterfully written story of human resilience and enduring love, The Plum Tree follows a young German woman through the chaos of World War II and its aftermath. Set against the backdrop of the German home front, this is an unforgettable novel of courage and resolve, of the inhumanity of war, and the heartbreak and hope left in its wake.


I'm really into historical fiction and fiction that deals with grief and struggle. I've never really enjoyed "happy" books because they feel too forced. I gravitate towards books that revolve around grief because it is representative of life. At some point or another, we all struggle, and when we overcome our struggles, happiness is much more sweet. Life (and our emotions) is multifaceted, so I always look for books that illustrate that.
 

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There's a lot for an INFJ man or woman to appreciate in Frank Herbert's Dune.

There's a full cast audio book out there if that's your thing. That version is well-rated on Audible (and there's a torrent available).

An example of what I'm talking about (from wikipedia):

Bene Gesserit are trained in "the minutiae of observation", noticing details that the common person would miss in the people and environment around them.

When combined with their analytical abilities, this "hyperawareness" makes the Bene Gesserit capable of divining secrets and arriving at conclusions that are invisible to everyone else.

... minute variations in a person's vocal inflection and body language allow a Bene Gesserit to deeply understand a person's emotional state, and manipulate it. Knowing that any schooling impresses a particular pattern in its students, they are able to use these clues to predict and anticipate actions.

Bene Gesserit specifically trained as Truthsayers are able to determine whether someone is lying by analyzing their speech, body language, and physical signs like pulse and heart rate.​
 

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Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain


Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
The Tao-Te Ching by Lao- Tzu (If you are interested in Tai Chi)
Memories, Dreams, Reflections by C.G. Jung
Life of Pi by Yann Martel
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
The Sparrow series by Mary Doria Russell
1984 by George Orwell/ The Road by Cormac McCarthy/The Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry
The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak

Check out these writers:

Vladimir Nabokov, all the books of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Charlotte Bronte, Shakespeare, Tolkien , Neil Gaiman, Oscar Wilde, Jane Austen, John Green, W.B. Yeats (poems), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Chinua Achebe, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Leonid Andreyev, Nikolay Gogol... so many writers you'll all will love.
 

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These are basically my favourite books :

1. When You Reach Me by (Rebecca Stead)

2. The Book Thief (Marcus Zusak)

3. Ender's Game (Orson Scott Card)

4. The Catcher in the Rye (J. D. Salinger)

5. Paper Towns (John Green)

6. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (E. L. Konigsburg)
 

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For me:

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. Romanticized autobiography of an ex-convict who escaped Australian prison, ended up in India, lived in Mumbai ghetto, joined Indian mafia and war in Afghanistan... What makes this book stand out for me is that it gives an insight into a mind of a man who is both tough and poetic, can be aggressive but also very emotional, lives at the edge of society, feels deeply for people and dabbles in philosophy. Richly written, full of both action and emotions, makes you question your prejudices.

Vorkosigan saga (13 or so SF novels, starting with "A Warrior's Apprentice") by Lois McMaster Bujold. Exceptionally inventive and intelligent novels about a crippled but genius young military strategist in space. Brilliant twists and solutions, diverse planetary societies, interesting dialogues, very little graphic violence, gentle humor and a lot of human warmth.

Brandon Sanderson (fantasy) - pretty much anything, especially the "Mistborn" series for sheer creativity and unusual twists and turns.

Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver - a novel about a missionary family which came to an African village completely unprepared for local lifestyle and challenges. A deeply compassionate story about diverse people caught in their own worldviews, tragedies, prejudice and weaknesses. Makes you feel almost as if you were really there sharing their experiences. Makes you much more aware of unjust suffering of African people.

Terry Pratchett Discworld series for thoughtful humor (I particularly liked novels focused on character Tiffany Aching).

I could go on for days... better to stop here.
 

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I definitely agree with The Book Thief. Also recommended is David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas. I assume other INFJs would enjoy it too - it's absolutely full of symbols and hidden meanings and patterns.

I am currently reading TH.White's The Once and Future King, which is wonderful - very witty and beautiful.

I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith - coming of age novel full of whimsy.

I could continue, but won't!
 

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The Kite Runner & A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

His Dark Materials trilogy by Phillip Pullman--I think it deals with a lot of ideas, especially pertaining to human nature & personal liberty that INFJs may be intrigued by. I certainly was when I first read it in elementary school, at any rate, and still did when I reread it later.

Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy by Douglas Adams. Unsurprisingly, not everyone can appreciate the humour in there. I think INFJs are one of the types that can.

Anything by Neil Gaiman. His books have a surreal, sometimes creepy quality and subtle humour that I enjoy.

The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffeneger. Appeals to the romantic INFJ in me.

House Rules by Jodi Picoult and some of her other books before that. I used to really enjoy her stuff when I was about 12, because she tells stories about family/personal issues that are relatable even if sometimes unrealistic. And she likes to weave her stories with other interesting pieces. Eg. In this book, she put in some excerpts about murders that tangentially connected with the story & the main character's interest in crime.

Daughter of Smoke & Bone by Laini Taylor. I went through a YA fantasy phase, and this is one of the few books that I will still stand by. Excellent, dreamy writing, and fantasy that I can actually delve into even at this age without feeling childish or cheesy.

@AmalyaIvy I second 1984 and The Giver series by Lois Lowry!! Excellent stuff.

--

Other stuff I really enjoy:
- Fairytale retellings--I like how old, familiar things can be made interesting & unique again in different settings/times/interpretations. Have a bunch of recommendations for these, will list them if anyone wants!
- Historical fiction, but this really depends. No interest in historical fiction that is just set in the past for the sake of it, love it when the author weaves in actual historical events & contexts that matter to what the characters are doing.
- Non-fiction!! Been leaning towards these more & more in recent years. Stuff exploring human nature, psychology, and where we are going. Books by Jared Diamond.
- A lot of the typical 'INFJ' books already mentioned. Books dealing with personal struggles/self-exploration, and books filled with symbolism about human nature.
 

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- Fairytale retellings--I like how old, familiar things can be made interesting & unique again in different settings/times/interpretations. Have a bunch of recommendations for these, will list them if anyone wants!
- Historical fiction, but this really depends. No interest in historical fiction that is just set in the past for the sake of it, love it when the author weaves in actual historical events & contexts that matter to what the characters are doing.
I LOVE fairytale retellings!! I love Robin McKinley, Donna Jo Napoli , Cameron Dokey, Jane Yolen... I also love historical novels. Jean Plaidy, Sarah Dunant and Elizabeth Kostova are some of my favourites authors.

Since you like Pullman, perhaps you might also like Eva Ibbotson's children's novels. They are funny, magical and really entertaining. Her witches and ghosts are the best!

I'm not a fan of romance novels because I still don't get most of them. However, I recently read L.M. Montgomery's 'The Blue Castle'. I loved it.
 
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-nominates thread for best thread ever-

Yes. Yaaaaaaas.
Thank you for this thread!

I second anything by Neil Gaiman.

I think INFJs will find Kafka's humor hilarious. I mean, I nearly died of laughter reading The Trial.

I'm not a fan of romance novels, however, sometimes I do this thing where I go into the library and pick random books off the shelf to read (and I've gotten to read incredible stories this way) and I picked up Benny and Shrimp. It's a romance novel but it was a completely realistic, funny, love-and-acceptance novel without a happy ending that makes you want to puke and I would actually recommend it. I read it in a day, so it's not long.

I love archaeological or scientific thrillers like titles from Jeff Long and James Rollins that include a mini education on a topic.

I've grown to detest self-help books because they're all repetitive, existential drivel that frustrates me because you can't actually apply it to real life, but there are two that I have to admit are incredible. Personal Development for Smart People by Steve Pavlina (visit his blog- I've read every one of this thousands of free articles- GENIUS.) and How to Quit Your Day Job and Live Out Your Dreams by Ken Atchity, which is more about how to balance your desire to be creative but starve, and your need to make money and live in reality. It's fantastic.

I loved Hero and the Crown (fantasy with strong female protagonist).

One of my ABSOLUTE FAVORITE SERIES is the Prototype series. There are two by M.D. Waters called Prototype and Archetype and they're freaking incredible. I loved them... They're adult science fiction. Recommmmeeenndded. (This being said my weakness in fiction is the combination of action-y front story, sexual tension between realistic human beings and deep internal transformation.)

I'm a writer, so, favorite books on writing are On Writing by Stephen King, Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott and Revision and Self-Editing for Publication by James Scott Bell.

I love every single one of Neil Peart's books. It's mostly travel writing, so non-fiction. Ghost Rider literally saved my life and Roadshow and Traveling Music are wonderful, too. He also has a blog if you want to check out his writing. (He's also the drummer for Rush, if anyone is interested. ;)

I also recently read and really enjoyed a book called Mount Terminus by David Grand. I love Grand's descriptions and the main character's isolated lifestyle and creative genius... he lives in an isolated villa in California and struggles to keep his world while California develops around him. The book is a bit dense and can be wordy at times, but I still really enjoyed it. Took me to another world. :)

I could go on forever, but I'll stop!

But also, for magazines- there is one I strongly believe every single INFJ would like. It's called The Sun. It has the most raw, human, incredible writing I've ever read and the stories are so poignant and relevant and ugh... it's so, so awesome. A bit expensive, but worth every penny.

HAPPY READING!

(Everything is linked for your Goodreads pleasure. ;)
 

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You Learn By Living
Eleanor Roosevelt wrote it a couple of years before her death
I don't know if she's an INFJ or not but what she shared I wholeheartedly agree because most were also my understanding as I am moving into the winter of my life.

Prometheus Rising
I strongly suspect Robert Anton Wilson is an ENTP. His mind went to all sorts of places (may have been helped by LSD) from the ways he wrote and his sense of humors.

His theories had helped me to refine the way I think and see the world. Prior to reading it I had already gone into that direction, to be open in how I saw people, events, and the world. His writing clarified and helped me moving firmly to the direction I've already chosen. It's late for me but if you are in your teens and 20s, you will benefit greatly if you see the wisdom in Wilson's theories.
 

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Dune by Frank Herbert: To be frank (see what I did there), it's the embodiment of mental masturbation for an Ni and/or Ti user.

Redwall by Brian Jaques: You are a child inside admit it and accept it!

Demons by Fyodr Dostoyevsky: In this novel he predicted the rise of the Bolshevik Party decades before the Russian Revolution (INFJ much?) But more interesting, the main character is a semi minor character and an apathetic loner in the novel who everyone is fascinated and obsessed with, he also happens to be the best example of a VERY dysfunctional INFJ.

In terms of personality I think the novel best speaks to the INFJ type because even though this individual is the main theme of the story he seems to have a secondary role in the narrative. Then at the end you see how all people were dancing to his tune in such a sublime way. It's like he was an INTJ, but people focused...
 

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....

I will surly add more to the list at a later date, but I want to hear your suggestions as I am looking for something to read as I just finished several works of C. S. Lewis (one of my favorite authors) and Eli The Good.
The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge through The Eagle's Gift; six books by Carlos Castaneda

God Stalk
by P.C.Hodgell

Pastwatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus by Orson Scott Card

The Eyes of the Overworld and Cugel's Saga by Jack Vance

The Lyonesse Trilogy by Jack Vance

Silverlock by John Myers Myers

Empire of the East by Fred Saberhagen

Dragonlance Chronicles trilogy and Twins trilogy by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman

The Anubis Gates by Timothy Powers
 

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Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
This novel is about love and hatred, about despair and madness. It is a clash of nature and Victorion culture, which leads to many devastating scenes. This book is beautifully written with many interesting characters.

A Book of Dreams by Peter Reich
This is a very special book. I learnt about it through Kate Bush's hit song Cloudbusting. It had been out of print for decades, until recently one publisher decided to publish it again. It is bascially about a young boy and his father. The father is a scientist who discovered some form of energy, which he uses to make it rain. This cloudbuster (as they call the device that makes the rain) is also used to fight flying saucers and restore the energy in the air. The most important subject is the boy, though, and his search for who his father truly was. This book is autobiographical.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
I've always found this book to be so sad. There is a crudeness to this book which tries to hide this sadness, but it doesn't really work. Holden Caulfield is a teen who is struggling to grow up. He runs away from his school and spends a few days in New York where he asks himself questions about life. The atmosphere crawls under your skin whilst reading this book; it really got me.

The works of Nescio
Nescio - Latin for "I don't know" - is a Dutch writer. His works are mainly about a group of friends (around the age of 25), stuck in their childhood dreams, defying authority and trying to find the meaning of life. That sounds heavy, and it is, but Nescio also knows how to make his readers laugh.


Other authors I really like: Charlotte Brontë, Oscar Wilde, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Leo Tolstoy, Louis Couperus.
 

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What are you implying?

Have you read Lolita? I'm assuming you are aware that Humbert Humbert is an unreliable narrator. Hebephile is not so different than a pedephile. He purposefully mislead the reader. 'Lolita' is one of the most widely misunderstood characters. I feel the Popular Culture had corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again.
 

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What are you implying?

Have you read Lolita? I'm assuming you are aware that Humbert Humbert is an unreliable narrator. Hebephile is not so different than a pedephile. He purposefully mislead the reader. 'Lolita' is one of the most widely misunderstood characters. I feel the Popular Culture had corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again.
Woah woah woah. I literally just posted a happy cuddle gif. I didn't say anything about the book. I have read it, I love it, and I know all about what you're saying. Yeesh.
 

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Woah woah woah. I literally just posted a happy cuddle gif. I didn't say anything about the book. I have read it, I love it, and I know all about what you're saying. Yeesh.


You do know that we notice symbolism is almost everything, right? It appears to me as a female pony with pigtails (I think) 'flirting' with a male pony who is completely confused. I picked it up as Humbert and Lolita. It's fine, if you are not implying that.
 

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You do know that we notice symbolism is almost everything, right? It appears to me as a female pony with pigtails (I think) 'flirting' with a male pony who is completely confused. I picked it up as Humbert and Lolita. It's fine, if you are not implying that.
No... they're both female and they're close friends. The one on the left thinks her friend is so cool and snuggles up to her. I just liked seeing you bring up Nabokov cos I think he's a genius.

And yeah, I know that "we" notice symbolism in almost everything; I'm an INFJ too.
 
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