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Ok so I know that a lot of us INFJs are talented at learning languages, but does anyone know if a specific method of learning is extra suitable to our personality type? Do you guys think language learning methods are more of a type thing, or a personal preference thing?

btw. I am embarking on learning Dutch as my 4th language. My first three languages were just naturally picked up during my childhood, but now I wish to stratiegically learn Dutch fluently before September...

Have any other INFJs become fluent in a new language within a few months? If so, how?

-Abbi
 

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I've never leaned more than a few words in another language, but I've heard the best way to go is through immersion. You don't just need to run through vocabulary words in a classroom, but have practice speaking and listening to it (preferably from native speakers), too.
 

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english is not my first language. I left my hometown after finishing 7th grade and then spent two years learning nothing but english and after that I got a place in a local school in an english-speaking country and I couldn't believe I have made such a great accomplishment.

from this experience, I realised that I learn best when I associate emotions and feelings with every I say or read or write (I guess it's a feeler thing) hence the trick is to read or watch or listen to something that you are passionate about. don't read dictionaries like a textbook the way I did when I first started to learn english, it was just a dumb way to learn =.=
 

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... not INFJ, but I took a left at the gas station and somehow ended up here.

All language is patterns; grab a good linguistic textbook (or wikipedia) and study it's patterns. K, you don't need to know the exact details of how everything operates and how things come to represent what they do even though the stuff is interesting. What is important is to know that words are constructed of smaller elements, that is prefixes, suffixes and other morphemes. That all words are things, describe things, or do things. That sentences have a specific structure and talk about things doing things. If you know the basic mechanics of language you can learn any language with relative ease. I don't speak Dutch, per se, but the language closest to English is Frisian and is spoken in the Netherlands. There will be many similarities with English and specific differences that also form patterns.

So, I'm looking at Dutch and much of it looks an English and German hybrid spoken with a thick guttural accent. The grammatical structure look analogous to German: that is object, subject, verb in some cases and the common subject, verb, object in others. Unlike English, the spelling looks to be consistent with the sound. You got the entire summer; no problem :)

edit: don't worry about being a perfectionist, just feel around the language intuitively and you'll eventually get the hang of how the pieces fit. Mind you it's possible to learn in 4 months, but understanding the idioms might be a different case.
 
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@Abbi

Best thing is thru immersion like said before.
Sitting down and learning everything word by word won't really work.

F types need to associate their feelings and emotions with words.

I myself read into what people say often more than what I can actually understand them.
 

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I think the best way to learn for an INFJ, and probably anyone else, is to immerse in an environment of the language in question, preferably people, preferably in the country in question.

Ni+Fe+Ti+Se will make language acquisition in a people environment automatic and efficient.

On another note, I often find it useful to sit down and read about the grammar of the language I'm learning. It gives structure to intuition, and speeds up the learning process.

At the time, I'm learning Japanese part time, and my everyday schedule/plan looks like this:

- 45 minutes of Kanji practice in the morning (with Heisig's Remember the Kanji)
- 25 minutes of Pimsleur Japanese (audio learning) on the bus to university
- 60 minutes of doing written exercises in a textbook in the evening

Besides my day schedule, I watch Japanese movies several times a week (and I watched a lot of anime in my youth), I listen to Japanese music everyday but not in a structured manner and I read books. Also I set my computer/Facebook/phone language to Japanese and I write in Japanese with a buddy of mine who follows the same plan as me.

As soon as I have good grasp of the complete grammar and know some vocabulary, I'm going to find a Japanese speaking Skype friend or something - as I mentioned, I enjoy being able to understand the structures before I put it into practice. Learning a language isn't something that's done in a few years, it's a lifetime thing, at least that's how I see it.

I think the key to learning anything is making it fun though.
 

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I've studied 17 languages (though I only speak 4 fluently) and make my living translating between them. I start with a textbook approach, studying grammar (generally the easiest & fastest bit to learn), which I see as the 'skeleton' of a language... I also start to study words, initially with a dictionary of some kind, and to practice listening to the language. But as soon as I can, I start to read books in the language, watch movies, listen to music to learn it through immersion.

I focus on reading/writing as I'm too much of an introvert to spend much time talking, but I do eventually learn to speak as well, and am generally pretty decent at pronounciation/accents. I do not learn well unless I have books - if I have to rely on talking/listening alone, I don't do well.

Immersion is best but IMHO you can speed up the process by also applying some grammar etc., especially in the early stages.

Feeling is essential for me, if I love a language I can learn it very quickly and become extraordinarily proficient in it. If I don't like it, I'll struggle. Falling in love with a native speaker can help a lot... ;-)
 

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English it is not my first lenguage, I learned by my own since I am little and a month ago I started going to official classes.

For me the best way of learning was this one, Internet. Also, traslating lyrics, watching tv shows and movies constantly. Being in forum and talking with people, how I am doing right now.

I never realized I was in fact learning english, it was like my brain did that by itself. I also believe that you can go and live in a country without knowing their mother tongue and after a year you would be talking the lenguage without a problem. Like I said, when it comes to lenguages, the ran can do it by itself without realizing it.

Sometims I find myself writing words that I think I don't know where I learned it, but while writing my brain typed it, it is just amazing. Reading in english it is a greap help, it is like my mind save everything what I read so when I am writing, I throw up all what I read before.
 

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I'm much better at visual things. I'm terrible at languages. I studied Irish for 12 years and Spanish for 6. I probably couldn't even string a sentence together now. A few months ago I decided to teach myself basic sign language. Even though I haven't studied it in a while I still remember just about everything I've learned because it's visual.
 

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Probably learning with other people, or through immersion. Something that allows you to practice each day, in various contexts. I don't think sitting down and just learning translations is a good idea.

If you have to translate a word from your new language into your old language before you know what it means, that's bad. I think programs like Rosetta Stone try to forbid you from translating words. The better way to go is making a new connection between the word in the new language and the object/concept. I think this would be especially beneficial for the intuitive types.

I've started using Duolingo lately, but I don't know just how good that site is yet. It makes you translate every once in a while, but I think it mostly uses concepts (and uses pictures and sounds). A nice thing about it is that it makes you listen to a native speaker and also speak back. It doesn't really "teach" you; that's another thing I noticed. It makes you figure things out by yourself, which seems to be effective. If you don't want to pay for a program, and you have no way to immerse yourself, it might be an okay option.
 

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One thing I tend to forget is that languages primarily are a way of communicating. Actually having to communicate with someone only through a given language is probably a motivating method.
 
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To me a language is a key that opens the door to something otherwise locked away from me. For example, there is virtually no information on personality types etc in the languages I speak, so I HAD to immerse myself into the English speaking world. It came naturally and effortlessly, because I was interested in the subject it gave me access to.

Similarly, if I don't understand a little Japanese, I can't watch certain TV shows and series (they're not always subbed). So I have to absorb as much as I can of the language step by step, without forcing it. That way, I begin to understand more and more what the characters are talking about in my series.

I admire the people here who can SYSTEMATICALLY learn a given language, I just can't do that. I've tried, but the mere thought of repetitive, disciplined and self-imposed, almost duty-like action feels too restricting and not fun at all.
 

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I admire the people here who can SYSTEMATICALLY learn a given language, I just can't do that. I've tried, but the mere thought of repetitive, disciplined and self-imposed, almost duty-like action feels too restricting and not fun at all.
The trick to systematic learning is to make it a habit. Do you ever think about brushing your teeth? No, you just do it, right? It takes some time to make something a habit, but afterwards there are fewer barriers to doing the activity. You also have to think about the WHYS of the learning process. Why am I torturing myself by doing this every day? Motivation is a key factor. And as I mentioned, there's really no contradiction between systematic learning and fun. I personally enjoy figuring the language out, and I enjoy telling other people about what interesting connections I've found.

A not so very systematic way of learning a language could be to watch a Japanese TV show. Pick out a word that sounds fancy to you and look it up, discover that it's actually central to a grammatic concept and then you read about and suddenly you just leveled up in Japanese and will e.g. always know that when someone says "darou", they're wondering about something. It's how I started out, and I still do this some times.
 
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I admire the people here who can SYSTEMATICALLY learn a given language, I just can't do that. I've tried, but the mere thought of repetitive, disciplined and self-imposed, almost duty-like action feels too restricting and not fun at all.
I love it. When I was 17, I spent my summer hols self-studying Russian, Latin, French and Spanish, catching up on several years' worth of high school studies in each. I had my textbooks and tapes and spent endless hours memorising words, studying grammar, listening and reading... Then again, I've always loved maths, too. I didn't spend a single hour actually talking to anyone though :p
 

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Spoken languages are not really something I have ever successfully grasped past a few greetings, much preferring written languages... all I really know in such cases is three basic questions: what will you use it for in the long term?, how will you stay motivated? and when do you plan to revisit any learnings with shared practise time?

Then again, my main literary challenges seem to be books written before 1970 or postgraduate academic texts that include pieces of French, German, Latin, Old English and depreciated vocabulary with subjects I read on occasion such as Nietzsche or classic literature I am starting to read more.
 

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Ok so I know that a lot of us INFJs are talented at learning languages, but does anyone know if a specific method of learning is extra suitable to our personality type? Do you guys think language learning methods are more of a type thing, or a personal preference thing?

btw. I am embarking on learning Dutch as my 4th language. My first three languages were just naturally picked up during my childhood, but now I wish to stratiegically learn Dutch fluently before September...

Have any other INFJs become fluent in a new language within a few months? If so, how?

-Abbi
I agree with what a few people have mentionned, grammar study, especially if you already know a few other languages, can be a real time-saver.

One of my favourite way of picking up new information is learning poems by heart in that language. The rythm and the rimes really help. I remember I first understood the syntax of the perfect tense in German through the poem Lorelei.
 

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Ok so I know that a lot of us INFJs are talented at learning languages, but does anyone know if a specific method of learning is extra suitable to our personality type? Do you guys think language learning methods are more of a type thing, or a personal preference thing?

btw. I am embarking on learning Dutch as my 4th language. My first three languages were just naturally picked up during my childhood, but now I wish to stratiegically learn Dutch fluently before September...

Have any other INFJs become fluent in a new language within a few months? If so, how?

-Abbi
Hey! I've always loved studying language and began in middle school, but most of I learnt was through reading books and magazines and watching movies without subtitles. Three years ago I decided to learn french by myself and bought exercise books, grammars, and so, plus used some websites (like Live Mocha) to practice conversation. Within three months I was able to survive in Paris for two weeks. :p
 

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Immersion is the key I find. When I'm immersed in the language, I seem to naturally pick up stuff or recall other related information much better. Unfortunately, for me at least, watching TV, listening to radio or trying to learn on the internet only goes so far. Anybody else have this frustration?
 
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