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I've been wondering whether there's any correlation between type and certain kinds of (mental) illness. I'd imagined that Feelers in general, and perhaps especially NFs, were more prone to mood disorders than other types. When I was on INTJ forum, a lot of them talked about having Asperger's Syndrome. The ENTP stereotype is that they are the MB psychopaths.

I've never been properly diagnosed, but I suspect I have a personality or mood disorder just from looking at my life. Certainly, I am historically unstable. It's important to recognize that the stigma associated with these kinds of illnesses is just that.

What are everyone else's thoughts on this? Are there any INFJs with mental illness who want to chime in?
 

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...I know I'm a little bit unstable mentally... i dont really know what to call my "issues" i've never been tested or anything but ...i know that somethings not "normal" (whatever that is). I may have an anxiety disorder, I may be hyper sensitive and I may have a lack of a need to socialize that is aparently unhealthy ...
I also occasionally feel detached from my body when I feel sad...
 

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I have Social Anxiety Disorder myself. I do have anxiety attacks from time to time but I've gotten enough to control over things that they're few and far between unless there's a pressing matter I find stressful. Aside from that, I suspect I may have paranoia as well. I tend to worry way too much about things beyond my control.
 

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There is no causal effect of personality on the development of mental disorders/mental illness. To suggest so is irresponsible. To take self-reported fad disorders as truth shows a pitiful lack of understanding of human nature. Also, the Myers-Briggs test and extensions are not inate characteristics of a person - they are a very limited, time dependant description of a few beheviors, meaningless in most appliacations these emperical test results are put to. All this forum is entertainment with a little flavor of psychobabble. Ask any reliable professional.

There is an effect on the answers to such test instruments by mental disorders/illnesses, but not enouh to be diagnostic. A person suffering from schizophrenia cannot think in abstract: obviously, this has a profound effect on any test he/she might take. Even with medication, these major illnesses have a serious effect on thinking.

So you have the cart before the horse. The illness may define the personality, to a certain degree, but personality is not a precurser of any mental syndrome. I have seen a lot of post where someone with no obvious understanding of the subject is playing one upmanship by claiming another is inferior and liable to be struck by a mental disorder because of a score on a non-standardized personality test. This is putrid behavior, and woefully ignorant.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There is no causal effect of personality on the development of mental disorders/mental illness.
I never said there was. I said I was speculating about the possible correlation between the two. Correlation does not equal causation, I'm aware.
To take self-reported fad disorders as truth shows a pitiful lack of understanding of human nature.
Nowhere did I say that I took self-reported disorders as truth.

Also, the Myers-Briggs test and extensions are not inate characteristics of a person - they are a very limited, time dependant description of a few beheviors, meaningless in most appliacations these emperical test results are put to. All this forum is entertainment with a little flavor of psychobabble. Ask any reliable professional.
I was under the impression that, when administered professionally, there should be very few changes in a person's type over the course of their lives, given that the time they are tested isn't one where they might not "be themselves," most probably due to stress. A function can take a very long time to develop, hence the idea of personality type being fairly static. Among other practical applications, I know Myers-Briggs is used to pick people for certain jobs and to help orient college freshman undecided in their majors. This could perhaps be irresponsible use of MB, but honestly I don't know enough about it to make that judgment.


The illness may define the personality, to a certain degree, but personality is not a precurser of any mental syndrome.
I didn't say it was. In fact, I agree with this point completely. You seem to be putting words in my mouth and then tearing them down as if they were my position-- i.e. the straw man fallacy.

I have seen a lot of post where someone with no obvious understanding of the subject is playing one upmanship by claiming another is inferior and liable to be struck by a mental disorder because of a score on a non-standardized personality test. This is putrid behavior, and woefully ignorant.
I agree, but, you didn't see that on this thread.
 

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As a group I'd say we enjoy identifying patterns & possible meanings behind emotions & behaviors more than others. Especially our own. I wouldn't say introverted intuition makes us more susceptible to mental illness than others but judging by the topics posted we enjoy analyzing our mental state more than others.

When people are sad they are sad. When they are happy they are happy. When they are angry they are angry. And that's the long & short of it for a lot of people. To us it's never that simple. If we are sad there must be an underlying reason we are sad & we're more likely to attribute it to our internal rather than external environment. ie. We might watch old yeller and feel sadness but rather than saying "the movie made me sad" we're more likely to blame it on the psychological aftermath of a childhood pet/relative we're still mourning & haven't fully worked through. It jives with our M.O. to look internally for a cause & externally for a label (ie. depression, GAD, BDD, PTSD, etc.).

That's my theory.
 

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I didn't say it was. In fact, I agree with this point completely. You seem to be putting words in my mouth and then tearing them down as if they were my position-- i.e. the straw man fallacy.
*nods*

My perspective: If the purpose is real dialogue, such behavior would not be useful. If the purpose is something else, it might make more sense. Whatever the case, I'm in favor of real dialogue here, and IMO this behavior isn't useful in a learning community.
 

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Interesting subject and one that comes up here now and again.

I think that, despite the observations given by @OldManRivers and despite problems caused by mis-typings this is a legitimate area to explore.

It does seem that many INFJs here have faced / do face problems relating to 1 or more of depression, anxiety, social phobia, ocd (I can tick all those boxes, though more so in the past than the present). Other conditions too but I think those are the main ones. My impression - and it is only an impression - is that INFJs are more vulnerable to these kinds of problems than the population as a whole.
 

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I have a history of anxiety disorders. I think it's just that I'm really sensitive. And that's also why I can be a bit of a recluse. I just need time to recharge my body and mind.

And lately my panic disorder is coming back *sigh* I wish I could just live closer to nature and never hear the news again. Or deal with angry rude people.
 

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My ex was an INFJ, she was a pathological liar prone to severe manic episodes stemming from BiPolar disorder, she had severe anxiety and an intense fear of being judged by people she would never see again (probably because she judged people so intensely).
She always talked about how being in a relationship with her required "hard work" and most people weren't ready for that.
She had definite psychopathic tendencies like lack of guilt, empathy and remorse, glibness, over-inflated sense of self worth and extreme manipulation.
She constantly talked about how she worked so hard on her book and how she about to discover something big, she wanted my help with this, but when I'd ask her to show me her book and other projects....there was nothing there and she'd get angry when I'd try to help.
When I broke up with her there was a full moon the size of a picture window behind her and I saw pure evil in her beautiful little face, she then threatened me by saying "I don't think you should feel safe here with me".
Anyway, when I told her that I knew many people that had BiPolar disorder and she definitely had it, part of her was relieved to finally know what was wrong with her....another part was angry at me for breaking the news..... at one point she even lashed out at me and screamed "how would you feel if someone just told you that you had BiPolar disorder!!", then she asked her only friend (her ex boyfriend) and her daughter if they thought she had it and both had the same response "Suzi, you definitely do".
I feel crushed for her, but also too scared of her madness to talk to her...wish she would call me, so I could help her get some help... after probably 20+ years without being diagnosed or seeking help, she is dying inside.
 

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Interesting subject and one that comes up here now and again.

I think that, despite the observations given by @OldManRivers and despite problems caused by mis-typings this is a legitimate area to explore.

It does seem that many INFJs here have faced / do face problems relating to 1 or more of depression, anxiety, social phobia, ocd (I can tick all those boxes, though more so in the past than the present). Other conditions too but I think those are the main ones. My impression - and it is only an impression - is that INFJs are more vulnerable to these kinds of problems than the population as a whole.
The internet in general seems to attract more disordered people, too. Might be another thing of interest to look into.
 

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The internet in general seems to attract more disordered people, too. Might be another thing of interest to look into.
I'm only speaking from a personal perspective here. It's much easier to "socialize" on the internet due to the anonymity it allows. You can also do so on your own terms and take as much time as you want to formulate your thoughts into words. Granted, it is still very possible to come across as an idiot online but the lack of any real punishment negates that fear. It's not a substitute for true contact with people and those I do know in a like mindset don't see it as such.

I think you're correct in that assessment. A lot of folks I've met online through the years often have personality disorders.
 
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I think the more you know people, the more you realize that everyone has quirks. Everyone can be diagnosed with something and the idea of "normal" is such a fallacy. Our quirks and eccentricities make us interesting. I'll take a quirky unusual person over a bread and butter person any day. I think we just need to find people to balance us out. I also wonder if NFs in general might have more anxiety because we're so sensitive with others. A friend was telling me about a problem she's having today, an intense problem, and I felt light-headed just hearing it. I'd rather feel that than nothing though.
 

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I think INFJs can be prone to certain obsessive or anxiety disorders.

I myself suffer from OCD. Primarily it's of the obsessive thoughts of my mind though. I don't think I have any sort of physical ritual I act out like washing my hands a certain amount of times, or hitting the desk until it feels "right", etc.
 

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Anxiety, agoraphobia, PTSD, depression. I say upbringing/environment/perhaps medical history and inherited illness, etc. would be the thing that would determine whether or not an INFJ is pushed to the point of mental illness. As you said, being a sensitive and introverted type, I'd suspect we are definitely more susceptible to emotional damage/trauma that can lead to these illness' over time with no relief or ability to relate or find comfort.
 

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^^

That's definitely a valid point. Unfortunately, I don't have a single shred of evidence to back it up, but it makes sense that we would be more vulnerable to these types of problems even just due to being as empathic as we are. As I mentioned, though; I have no evidence upon which to base my unscholarly observations.

Apparently I can't quote a post with a link until I have 15 posts? I'm assuming it's to stop link spammers...

er... OK so the post I was quoting was apparently back a bit further than I realized...
 
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