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You're confusing optometry with opthalmology, which deals with a lot more specific issues. You don't need to go to medical school to become an optometrist, you go to optometry school which also is another 4-year program after receiving your bachelors and taking the OAT.
 

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Are you any good with computers? I've been researching careers myself because I'm getting older and need a more steady income, 401k, and all that stuff my anti-careerist, INFP self hates thinking about, but nonetheless must be considered. If money is a main priority, I know software developers make a crap load of money, and it's probably the fastest growing job around. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the median pay for a Software developer is $93,350. I'm not sure how well the profession correlates with an INFP personality, but I imagine it requires a great deal of creativity, and it's probably the type of job where you work alone a lot which is a plus if you're particularly introverted. I think you only need a B.S. in computer science to land an entry level job.

Good luck!
 

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Are you any good with computers? I've been researching careers myself because I'm getting older and need a more steady income, 401k, and all that stuff my anti-careerist, INFP self hates thinking about, but nonetheless must be considered. If money is a main priority, I know software developers make a crap load of money, and it's probably the fastest growing job around. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the median pay for a Software developer is $93,350. I'm not sure how well the profession correlates with an INFP personality, but I imagine it requires a great deal of creativity, and it's probably the type of job where you work alone a lot which is a plus if you're particularly introverted. I think you only need a B.S. in computer science to land an entry level job.

Good luck!
An "INFP personality" and profession correlation wouldn't really have anything to do with each other, I think, unless their Fi-Te draws them towards computer science for whatever reason.

Otherwise, yeah. I know several Computer Science majors who will be graduating with a B.A. instead of a B.S. and have landed jobs in Microsoft and other extremely well-known companies. I believe this is also partly because of their co-op/internship experiences either during the school year or the summer as my school has a good program for matching students with potential employers given their connections with numerous companies. From what I've heard, B.A. vs. B.S. don't matter too much for the Computer Science field; they're really looking more to see if you mesh well with the company and if you have the appropriate skills for the job and so on.
 

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I'm thinking about being a Therapeutic Psychologist or a Forensic Psychologist.
 

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Could try Medical Perfusionist. Little known, high demand, excellent pay ($100k+), and in a field that lets you travel if you choose.

Not sure about the stress levels, but I imagine once you're used to it, it's like any regular job.
 

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I'm glad someone can relate. INFP is the worst personality type ever. For now I'm thinking of becoming an optometrist and working really hard, because I really want to be one. I hope thinks work out for you. If you're like me you're going to want to get involved in something calm that helps others.
Are you kidding? We INFPs are the best! Our devotion and determination, once formed, can be stronger than that of most other personality types; once we've picked a field, nothing can stop us from climbing to the top. Except it isn't really about getting to the top, or making money; it's about helping people (and hopefully ourselves) along the way.

If you're thinking of becoming an optometrist, then I'm sure you'll make a really good one! Go for it!
 

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I am in college doing general ed because I cannot decide on anything. I'll spend hours searching just to find that there's nothing right for me. I like writing and music, but that doesn't equal a high guaranteed paycheck, which I need. My career needs to not be too stressful (due to depression and anxiety I have no tolerance for stress), have a high pay (80k/year or higher), and not require grad school (maybe a master's but a PhD would be way too long). This pretty much narrows it down to finance, but I hate math. What can I do? I would like to be an Optometrist but college is already really difficult and I'm only in my second semester, how the heck will I do med school? Plus it takes too long to be an optometrist. I want to work in healthcare but it all requires too much school. What can I do? I'm starting to feel hopeless like there's nothing for me.

Any career might be for you, but first you need to do a sort of rigorous inventory of your skills and likes/dislikes. I'm sure there's some sort of skills test you can take that is provided by your school. You want to find something that you really like doing such that getting paid for it is a bonus. Seriously, not to many people waltz into an 80K a year job, you earn your way up to that (unless you know someone who can get you in somewhere). People your age are going to change careers around 7 times in your lifetime, so don't get so wedded to one career or another. Build your skillset around what you're good at and go from there.
 
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