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I'm just about positive that I'm an INFP for many reasons but the one thing that doesn't seem to fit is that INFP's are very emotional and can be whiny crybabies. I'm almost the opposite of that. I bottle up my emotions and even if I wanted to I'm terrible at expressing them the way I want to. And I'm definitely not whiny because I don't like to burden people with my problems and I always tell myself there's someone out there who has it a lot worse.

Any thoughts? Are any other INFP's like this? Just how common is it to have some exceptions to your type? =/
 

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I'm just about positive that I'm an INFP for many reasons but the one thing that doesn't seem to fit is that INFP's are very emotional and can be whiny crybabies. I'm almost the opposite of that. I bottle up my emotions and even if I wanted to I'm terrible at expressing them the way I want to. And I'm definitely not whiny because I don't like to burden people with my problems and I always tell myself there's someone out there who has it a lot worse.

Any thoughts? Are any other INFP's like this? Just how common is it to have some exceptions to your type? =/
Well first off a lot of people mistype as INFP's so you may want to get that re-verified.

but also, the theory that INFP's are whiny crybabies and are emotion is a stereotype. A stereotype based off of real people but not one that can be applied to all of them. within every mbti type there is PLENTY of room for variability. it's a misconception that everyone can fit into 16 precise descriptions and not vary from them.

INFP's are emotionally driven, but that doesn't necessarily mean they constantly gush out their emotions whenever possible. Usually when one does or has an emotional outburst, that is the sign that they have some kind of unbalance or that they are at their breaking point. or it means someone has treaded on one of their personal values.

tbh it's completely normal for an INFP to keep his/her emotions inside and underwraps. They have dominant Fi, it's not natural for them to have their emotions take place externally in any form. at least not for the majority of the time.

Also many INFP's whine on here because this is the internet and saying something on here isn't the same as saying something outloud to someone in person. It doesn't interfere with their introverting.
 

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Yeah, I'm not really emotional. I get confused (even by myself) for a Thinker all the time. Oh, I do definitely have my moments of emotionality, but it's not a common occurance and always set off by an event. Most of the time everything is locked away inside and when it does come out, it's always awkward. I can't express myself anywhere near the amount I wish I could.

The internet does break down some of these barriers. A lot of the people on this forum are in their teens and feel extremely different from society, which plays a role in how the threads are. Have a look at the "What makes YOU unique from other INFPs thread" to see how other INFPs are weird :wink:
 

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I've never been able to understand that stereotype. Then again, I've only ever known one other INFP for sure, and she was not the best example.

I really don't show my emotional side very often (though it is definitely there). Then again, I grew up in an environment which taught me that being emotionally sensitive was perceived as a weakness, so I've always bottled things up. I don't like to complain to others and usually don't feel that I have a right to do so, anyway. When asked how I feel, generally speaking, I'm "fine."
 

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Outwardly emotional or inwardly emotional?

INFPs are inwardly emotional. Emotions are important and anything important, we only share important things with those close to us. Otherwise, INFPs just drop people abruptly without notice.
 

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I used to be emotional but I've learnt to keep many things to myself. Partly because I think as an INFP once I get upset about someone I can be very irrational and make things up against them which may not even have happened or can be explained in a very sensible way. So I tend to wait until another person pipes up about how horrible taht person is, and then once someone else agrees, I speak up.
Yeah I bottle up emotions and it's hard for me to confront someone about them in the moment without erupting. So I tend to wait until I've calmed down sufficiently or thought through it all and then I tell them.
But sometimes I wait so long that by the time I tell them I myself find it irrelevant already!

And sometimes I've even been accused of being emotionally detached! But i'm certain I'm an INFP, because when I do become emotionally involved I behave like an INFP !!
 

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The thing is, as INFPs, that whilst we have all the tendencies to make us "whiny crybabies" whether we are or not is a choice. I wouldn't be surprised if most INFPs feel intense emotions at times, get broody and dark and need to let it all out. But how we deal is down to us. An immature INFP might be a whiny crybaby but that is a choice, not a personality trait. "You can't always choose how you feel. But you can choose what you do about it." I dunno who said that but I heard it somewhere once. Sure, we operate primarily on Fi and thus heavily affected by our internal emotions. But it's down to us how we deal with them. I know I could be a whiny crybaby if I let myself but I try not to. I try to deal with my emotions or else find an outlet
 

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I, and a few others that I know, do have the tendency to view INFPs as "ticking time bombs".

I've seen an INFP flip out emotionally... and I'd have to say that I've only seen it overshadowed in its insanity once (My ESFJ mother who chased me down the street in her PJ's, screaming at me because I told her to calm down).

I mean... this guy's Fi-freakout was so bad that he started completely changing and editing facts to fit his own emotional reality, ignoring any and all attempts to calm him down by calm, rational, Ti... resorting to guilt trips, passive aggressiveness... anything to get his internal ethics validated.

It was... utter and complete insanity.

So now if I see that someone is an INFP... I'm not going to lie... I do get the sensation that I ought to tread as carefully as possible and limit the conversation to small talk, and never say anything of substance in order to avoid emotional carnage.
 

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I know exactly what you mean, why would other people want to know anyway, it's almost like I feel I am the opposite of emotional most of the time, because I literally never say what I'm feeling or even what I think about most things. I think that it means that we are more emotional inside, maybe we really do have more feelings than a lot of other types and a lot of people are just heartless b****rds!
 

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First, I think calling us "whiny crybabies" was really rude, so *moons you.*

Secondly, I'm mostly outwardly emotional when I am alone. Now, I am very, very emotional and I cry at movies and at the end of a good book and such, but I'm certainly not a crybaby. I can stand up to anyone and not shed a tear. I get more emotional about the beautiful things of life.

As I said in another post, I think we INFPs have such a rich experience of life that we cannot contain it sometimes, whether we outwardly are emotional or turn it inwards.
 
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I've known a few INFP's who are a damn rock to outsiders. Cold, hard, and yes, logical.
 

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I generally have observed that people who like to point out the "emotionality" of others, haven't come to terms with their own emotions. I have met many so called "stoic" individuals who can berate other people for being irrational, yet be totally unaware of their own emotional reaction at the same time (fear, anger, annoyance, apprehension etc). They believe the other person is the cause of their own disturbance, and don't even consider the origin of their own annoyance might lie in their own emotions.

Ultimately I think it is better to own emotions rather than to claim otherwise. You lose nothing and gain self awareness in the case of the former, and you risk losing self awareness in the case of the latter.

I would rather claim and own my own experiences of emotions than believe myself to be "calm, logical" and above them, in some way or another.
 

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I think I'm more hypersensitive (in terms of the extent to which I feel things when moved or inspired) than I am emotional. How that sensitivity manifests itself externally is another matter. Usually I just keep it to myself or find some creative outlet.
 

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I'm exactly the same way.
I can still remember a while ago when I was reading this book. The ending was so inspirational, it was extremely sad but beautiful at the same time. I had never read a better ending. However, as much as I wanted to, I couldn't cry. I hate how even when I am amazed or moved by something, I can't let my emotions go.
It's the same way with worship. I love God as much as the next person, but I've only cried once when worshipping Him. When I look around and see others crying, it kind of makes me jealous of them... why can't I do that?
But yeah, even though I don't have a lot trouble talking about my feelings, I do have trouble letting them show. That's the one thing in the INFP description that didn't quite fit me. Also, I am very close to being an INTP... I think it was 60%F - 40%T or something like that. Maybe we're alike in that aspect.
 
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