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I was wondering if there's anyone else here like this or if anyone can give advice on this. I've taken a lot of MBTI's, really detailed ones from either my colleges or online. Almost all the time, it would show me as an INFP but the percentage for the F is always super low or the percentage for the T is just about as much as the F. I identify with all the INFP material I've seen floating around just as much as I identify with all the INTP material floating around.

What does this mean?
Am I some kind of dual type??

I also saw the Love Type threads. Seems like INTP and INFP males' only best match are INFJs. Funny because most of the people closest to me past and present were mostly INFJs: lovers, best friends, etc...
 

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INFPs and INTPs are often very similar. Both are individualistic and contemplative. But exactly because these types are so similar it is more obvious to assume that you are either a very rational INFP or an emotional INTP, rather than being a mix. The dominant and inferior functions tend to be domineering in one's life, which means that both values and rationale will be important to both INFPs and INTPs, so basically you need to find out if you are biased towards dominant feeling or thinking.

I myself am an INFP who often wears the INTP's clothes. A lot of my interests are in that department and I often come across as slightly emotionless, but I still match the description of the idealist better.
 

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I think this is quite common. I think INTPs and INFPs are very similar on the surface, and these tests can only really measure what's on the surface so it's quite likely that they'll get those types confused sometimes. I have quite a few stereotypically INTP interests for example, and especially if you're male there might be a bias towards INTP because that would be more common.

From the point of view of cognitive functions, etc. I really don't think there can be such things as a dual-type, you'll be one or the other, but these types can be pretty broad.

Apart from what you get from tests, do you have any other reason to doubt being an INFP?
 

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I was wondering if there's anyone else here like this or if anyone can give advice on this. I've taken a lot of MBTI's, really detailed ones from either my colleges or online. Almost all the time, it would show me as an INFP but the percentage for the F is always super low or the percentage for the T is just about as much as the F. I identify with all the INFP material I've seen floating around just as much as I identify with all the INTP material floating around.

What does this mean?
Am I some kind of dual type??

I also saw the Love Type threads. Seems like INTP and INFP males' only best match are INFJs. Funny because most of the people closest to me past and present were mostly INFJs: lovers, best friends, etc...
First off, "Seems like INTP and INFP males' only best match are INFJs." FAAAAAAAAAALSE!!!!!! Do not box yourself in like this. Not only is this an untrue observation (many type preferences align well with intp and infp (enfj, entj etc.), but to some infps and to some intps, your true ideal match may very well be the least conventionally accepted match. Know what you want in a relationship, but always keep your eyes and options open (to some degree).

from what little I know, the mbti is strictly about cognitive PREFERENCES, meaning that in some cases where you identify with two types equally, I think it is plausible that you could identify with both mbti functions. Over time as you continue to develop yourself, you may find to prefer one function over the over and hence identify more with that one, but as for now, there is no reason to put yourself in one box when you fit inside two. Also, remember that various stereotypes within mbtis are loose. Yes, an infp is characterized as less rational than intp, but this is not a truth, it is just how these cognitive preferences (how one pools and processes information from the world) can guide personality traits and self expression. An infp may very well be much more rational than an intj, (even if they come across as the opposite), just as an enfj may go to less parties than an infp. Cognition is not an end all, just a preference, and does not fully dictate your actions and behavioral patterns with an iron fist. I think it best to remember this fact, and not think like there are "infp" clothes, and then there are "intp" clothes, that preferring intp makes you less emotional than being infp. There's so much more to you beyond cognitive preference, just as there is so much more to you beyond a four letter label. The mbti is not designed to box you in and limit yourself to your true self, but just to better understand yourself and also how you identify with others and things in life.

someone correct me if what I said is untrue.
 

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Dual types do not exist, from what I've heard. You could be an INFP with a strong sense of Extraverted Thinking and/or a tendency to act like an INTP - both of those are actually similar to me. Alternatively, you could be an INTP with an abnormally strong feeling preference.

In any case, NFs are really good pairs for INFPs and perhaps INTPs - I particularly like ENFJs, myself :happy:
 

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Dual types do not exist, from what I've heard. You could be an INFP with a strong sense of Extraverted Thinking and/or a tendency to act like an INTP - both of those are actually similar to me. Alternatively, you could be an INTP with an abnormally strong feeling preference.
My personal take on it, and it's just a theory of mine, is that Fi and Ti are broader than you might think. Ti can handle emotions and Fi can handle logical thinking; they just have a different way of doing it, and different priorities. If you're an INFP who's into maths for example, that doesn't mean your Te is necessarily strong, it means that it happens to appeal to your Fi.
 

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An infp may very well be much more rational than an intj, (even if they come across as the opposite)
I'd go one step further, actually, and say that an INFP is more likely to be rational than an INTJ because our first function is rational. It probably comes across as the opposite because our rationality is introverted and so there's the need to use weaker functions to express it.
 

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For a couple of weeks when starting out I thought that I must be a Ti dom and most likely INTP (rather than the INFJ result I normally received or the INFP/ISFP/INFJ/ISFJ result). I think my biggest issue was over understanding the Jungian thinking function versus general cognition (all of the functions). What I do every day naturally and comfortably is spend time in my head evaluating, analyzing, and contemplating. I call it "thinking". MB Thinking is focused on a very specific subset of the general, common concept of "thinking".

Another big hurdle I had to overcome was to gain an understanding of what Jungian Feeling was all about, especially when introverted.

Dario Nardi's test helped me to appreciate: Keys 2 Cognition - Cognitive Processes
1. That I seem to be an Fi dom; and,
2. That I seem to use Ti much more than typical for an INFP.

In re-reading the OP, I see that you took the MBTI in college. Was that recent enough that you remember what the administrator had to say when reviewing your results with you? [I'm assuming "in college" meant the actual, paper MBTI 2 proctored by a counselor.]
 

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Remember what the alphabet code is, which is defining which functions are your dominant and auxiliary. You have a primary and an auxiliary, whichever they are; the percentage scores are a measure of the test, not a measure of what the test is attempting to measure. They are pretty much meaningless and I wouldn't worry about them, although they can vaguely correlate with how extreme you perceive your introversion or extraversion to be - that's as much stock as I would put in them.

Borderline types do indeed exist - ambiversion comes to mind - but it's rarer than you think, it's not one of those things where everyone clusters close to the middle, and I/E type variants share the same functions and a similar function stacking anyway; I know an INFP who reports that they seem to fit the INFJ profile just as well, but that would be showing a very unusual high use of functions associated with both. I do not think, I/E borderline perhaps excluded, there exists such a thing as a dual type, even if you fit descriptions of both well.

INFPs and INTPs share the same auxiliary, extraverted intuition. Their dominant functions are shadow functions of the other type, meaning effectively that there is little overlap, there isn't really 'room' for a nearly-balanced INT/FP mix. As an INTP, your primary feeling function is Fe (not Fi) and you don't prioritise it much anyway. As an INFP, your primary thinking function is Te (not Ti) and you don't put prefer to use it anyway.

So essentially, INFPs and INTPs can share a lot of similar traits (traits only correlate with type, Myers-Briggs type is actually irrelevant to your behaviour) and there's a lot of mistyping, but type descriptions and tests are vague, limited and generally don't help with the confusion. Type descriptors, especially, suck, in that they are often based around an idealised version of a type which tends to be enneagram-biased as well, and they tend to be overwhelmingly positive. That's problematic because healthy, well-developed people of any type, especially ones sharing a major function (Ne, in this case) will display traits which appear to match both.

If you look deeper into it, Fi vs Ti, it becomes clearer once you learn to spot those functions in your behaviour patterns. For you to actually be balanced INF/TP, that would presumably imply that your use of both Fi and Ti is very high (creating a lot of conflict in the process, I would think) and most types with dominant one suck at using the other, at it's a shadow function and is rarely exercised. Personally, my use of Ti is horrendous and although I admittedly don't understand it that well, I rarely catch myself specifically using it (or what I think it is). By comparison, my Te (perhaps unusually so for an INFP) is well-developed and oft-used.

Stereotypes will mess with your understanding of typology, although as you read up on it more, you can start to see where some of them come from. Beware of stereotypes (some already repeated in this thread) that INTPs are 'logical' and INFPs are 'emotional' and that's the difference. The F vs T divide is likely to encourage certain sets of traits and types of awareness in the respective person and that stereotype does have roots so I won't deny that distinction entirely, but simplifying it and generalising to that level is just entirely wrong. Thinkers feel, feelers think. Neither thinking nor feeling are the same thing as logic or emotion.

So, look into Fi vs Ti, and while you're at it remember that everyone uses every function to a degree; I think it's unlikely you'll read a description of a function and say 'no, I never do that'.
It's extremely unlikely you make high, practised, consistent use of both with equal priority. Looking into functions use also to an extent involves comparing stereotypical traits/behaviours associated with them, which can be incorrect, but it is a start and is an improvement upon attempting to figure out type descriptions. Your dominant function has to be either Ti or Fi (or whatever else it could be, who knows?), and that's true even if both are well-used and practised, so the best way to figure out whether you are an INTP or INFP is to research those further.
 

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I had the same problem as you when i first learned about MBTI. I could not decide if i was an INFP or an INTP.

I highly recommend you to study a little bit about the Cognitive Functions, instead of reading only the description of each type. After you understand well enough the functions, YOU will be able to figure out your own type. All the tests i took pointed out to either INFP or INTP, but after i did what i mentioned above, i came to the conclusion that i'm really an INFJ.

tl;dr: Study cognitive functions -> Figure out your own type
 

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It is odd how I feel and think. A comatose stare into my drink. Numb, no feelings, no pain. Critically dissecting myself in vain. Other times I feel a flood flowing below. No dam, not even Hoover could make it slow.
 

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Stereotypes will mess with your understanding of typology, although as you read up on it more, you can start to see where some of them come from. Beware of stereotypes (some already repeated in this thread) that INTPs are 'logical' and INFPs are 'emotional' and that's the difference. The F vs T divide is likely to encourage certain sets of traits and types of awareness in the respective person and that stereotype does have roots so I won't deny that distinction entirely, but simplifying it and generalising to that level is just entirely wrong. Thinkers feel, feelers think. Neither thinking nor feeling are the same thing as logic or emotion.
I think you made a great and well-written post, and I am glad that you chase down stereotyping at its root. However, even though Thinking and Feeling as Jungian functions cannot be equated with everyday uses of words like logic and emotion, I find it hard to escape the notion that Ti-doms are logical and Fi-doms are emotional. To me it is not even a stereotype, it's basically a part of the definition. No one knows what Fi or Ti is on the neurological level, it is basically just an abstract postulate, all we can do is to look at the behavior of people that are associated with their respective type, so just saying that it is all about the functions and not the associated behavior is too trusting in the theory's own consistency and not so reflective of "the real world".
I know that this is a common complaint, and actually it wasn't the one I first intended to write, but I believe it has some merit. Being logical or emotional should be part of the consideration of one's type.

(I am not sure that we actually disagree on anything, but I just felt a need to add this)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
In re-reading the OP, I see that you took the MBTI in college. Was that recent enough that you remember what the administrator had to say when reviewing your results with you? [I'm assuming "in college" meant the actual, paper MBTI 2 proctored by a counselor.]
I took it more than once and it was the official test proctored by counselors. They just assume I'm INFP and continued to give me job advice. I don't have the test results, just some papers about our sessions. I do, however, remember the results because they were on bar graphs and the T/F stood out because it was always really low or were really close to each's levels.

Apart from what you get from tests, do you have any other reason to doubt being an INFP?
I don't have any reason to doubt I'm INFP, I relate with it too well but I really don't have any reason to doubt I'm INTP either because the same goes.

__________________________

Thanks for the inputs, I appreciate it. Yeah, I've only started reading about this stuff. I didn't pay much attention to it before because I had other things on my mind. I'm still pretty lost about my type especially with the convolution that I might be some other type too. It just frustrates me a lot because half of the times my behavior and preferences changes between what's described of the two. I really don't think I'm INFJ though, but I want to believe I'm INFP. I've been reading up more on this, it hasn't helped much to distinguish me between INTP and INFP other than give me a broader overview.
 

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"Hi! How was work today? Oh, no way! That's such a bummer, I'm sorry. Hmm...wanna talk about it? Or not. It's up to you."

See? We can have this kind of conversation, too. We're just less often sincere while having it, than (say) an INFP. It doesn't mean we don't care---we care enough to seem caring.

I'm doing a horrible job of explaining this....in a way that doesn't promote stereotypes...

I think that F and T are fundamentally different in the way we experience our emotions, not whether or not we experience them at all. I feel things very deeply. All the time. However, my feelings are usually reactionary to the world around me---animal cruelty, for instance, evokes pure rage and dismay from my melon heart (thank you, Adventure Time, for that brilliant analogy). Tears of anguish and pain come shooting out of my face like crazy hot missiles. On the same token, it's almost impossible for me to comfortably and fully engage with my innermost "self-feels". I think most INTPs would prefer to avoid this exercise at all costs. This is not necessarily problematic on the regular, but it can make "day-to-day", deeply personal empathy more challenging. Which is neither good nor bad, it just is. Our casual avoidance of our own feelings really becomes an issue in times of stress, or while trying to process intense emotions (like trauma, for example).

INFPs are a lot like INTPs, in a lot of ways. I once thought I was one of you lovelies myself, once upon a time. It's not so unusual to confuse the two. Nor is it cliche. I think it's prolly a great sign that you are a dynamic and complex individual, who has a lot more going on as like a unique human, than whatever a 4-letter acronym implies.

But you already knew that. Bc said before.

Anyway, just thought I'd drop you a line from the dark side of the moon (i.e. we're all weird and depressed over there, right now...i donno what's going on, but it's kinda creeping me out).
 

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I think that F and T are fundamentally different in the way we experience our emotions, not whether or not we experience them at all. I feel things very deeply. All the time. However, my feelings are usually reactionary to the world around me---animal cruelty, for instance, evokes pure rage and dismay from my melon heart (thank you, Adventure Time, for that brilliant analogy). Tears of anguish and pain come shooting out of my face like crazy hot missiles. On the same token, it's almost impossible for me to comfortably and fully engage with my innermost "self-feels". I think most INTPs would prefer to avoid this exercise at all costs. This is not necessarily problematic on the regular, but it can make "day-to-day", deeply personal empathy more challenging. Which is neither good nor bad, it just is. Our casual avoidance of our own feelings really becomes an issue in times of stress, or while trying to process intense emotions (like trauma, for example).
This pretty much confirms what I've suspected for a while. Mum's always said that my brother and I are a lot alike but I wasn't quite convinced; I felt like we probably came across in a similar way but our brains worked differently. Sure enough, he and I have just figured out he's an INTP. I guess both of us being quiet and having these intermittent emotional outbursts is enough to make us look the same, but the difference is that I'm more in touch with my emotions and even though I try to keep them in they do tend to spill over (usually over something seemingly unrelated), whereas your way sounds a lot more like him, the crazy "overreaction" to certain triggers but otherwise not a lot of feel-y talk.

Actually that may not have been as clear a distinction as it seemed in my head. Can you feel me, feelers?
 

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I get dominant Fi and Ti mixed up all the time and I can see it is easy to mistype the two, not even being sure myself of INFP vs INTP.

I think you guys having the dominant Fi gives you a quick inkling of"right" or "wrong" but more from your personal experiences and beliefs.
Dominant Ti is more about being "correct" or "incorrect" from a combination of logic and experience.
Inferior Se can manifest itself with an INFP by them doing something reckless.
Inferior Fe can manifest with an INTP by them overreacting or having bizarre emotional outbursts
 

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INFPs and INTPs appear similar but if you look into it more you'll realize there are some fundamental differences. They are mostly due to Fi/Te vs Ti/Fe which gives different cognitive priorities to each person. My boyfriend is INTP and our differences become apparent when we discuss complex issues, I tend to get hooked up on details due to inferior Te and try to put them one by one to make a whole while he usually just starts from the whole and if he feels the need he takes it apart.
 

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Thanks for the inputs, I appreciate it. Yeah, I've only started reading about this stuff. I didn't pay much attention to it before because I had other things on my mind. I'm still pretty lost about my type especially with the convolution that I might be some other type too. It just frustrates me a lot because half of the times my behavior and preferences changes between what's described of the two. I really don't think I'm INFJ though, but I want to believe I'm INFP. I've been reading up more on this, it hasn't helped much to distinguish me between INTP and INFP other than give me a broader overview.
I suggest you take the Enneagram. I tested as an INTP for years and never questioned it. Recently, I've learned that I'm more of an INFP, who takes on an analytical and observational approach to life in order to understand. (Which is type 5 of enneagram.)

I know I'm not really breaking down your situation into T vs F functions. Obviously all T's feel and are moved and F's think and rationalize. It's just another tool that could help you explain as you try to figure this one out.
 
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