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Discussion Starter #1
I know this question gets asked a lot for different types but there is always new experiences to learn from.
Would be good to hear the pros and cons and how long you had the job/business for? Do you still do it or if not, why not?
Bye for now
 

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I haven't had job experience so far. But I can see myself either hopping between jobs or doing a slack job by myself if I can't change the job which doesn't provide me enough freedom, given my internship experience lol. Most of the jobs are pretty repetitive, which is good when it happens to a certain degree. However I get bored if it happens too much. Anyways for now I am more or less interested in developing a videogame(not sure if I would finish them tho, even tho I have a holistic view of the things that I want in that game), I have also developed 3-4 fictional stories which I may or may not really release due to me constantly retconing them. However I would rather create it as an independent web series rather than working for some editors. Not sure how I would develop enough money to live tho, it is one aspect which I haven't thought of so far. So maybe learning some marketing skills would be useful.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I haven't had job experience so far. But I can see myself either hopping between jobs or doing a slack job by myself if I can't change the job which doesn't provide me enough freedom, given my internship experience lol. Most of the jobs are pretty repetitive, which is good when it happens to a certain degree. However I get bored if it happens too much. Anyways for now I am more or less interested in developing a videogame(not sure if I would finish them tho, even tho I have a holistic view of the things that I want in that game), I have also developed 3-4 fictional stories which I may or may not really release due to me constantly retconing them. However I would rather create it as an independent web series rather than working for some editors. Not sure how I would develop enough money to live tho, it is one aspect which I haven't thought of so far. So maybe learning some marketing skills would be useful.
Key lessons: freedom - creative pursuit - less perfectionism to help completion of projects - independence - marketing skills. I would also suggest watching YT videos of people with your opposite profile type ie, ESFJ. You pick up the vibe and attitude needed to balance your type which may be whats needed to turn your creativity into a living. Thanks for your feedback.
 

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Key lessons: freedom - creative pursuit - less perfectionism to help completion of projects - independence - marketing skills. I would also suggest watching YT videos of people with your opposite profile type ie, ESFJ. You pick up the vibe and attitude needed to balance your type which may be whats needed to turn your creativity into a living. Thanks for your feedback.
I don't really get along that well with ESFJs I know irl.
 

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I'm basically an INFP, and I'm still figuring out a career. I think I've discovered a lot about what I want out of a job, through doing lots of jobs I don't like.

I'm pretty deep on the F side, so you may or may not relate to this, but I've found that it's extremely important to me that I have a fulfilling career. Part of this is probably due to how idealistic I was growing up, about what I'd do when I grew up.

I honestly hate the job I'm at right now, which is unfortunate because it's not a bad job. I'm basically doing customer service, with a product I don't care about. I like talking to customers, but I find the job pointless. The job I hated the most that I ever did was working at a thrift store, because selling junk to people was just very bleak.

I have a master's in foreign policy, and I've found work related to that extremely rewarding. I did development work in Africa and Asia for a few years, mostly in public health and grant writing, and I loved doing that, exploring different cultures and feeling like I was doing meaningful work. I intend to get back to something relevant to foreign aid.

I like teaching, and I would enjoy teaching a subject I find really interesting, like social studies or English. That said, if I become a teacher, I think I'll feel like I'm settling, since I always wanted to do something more ambitious growing up.

I worked as a journalist for a little while, and I loved doing that. That said, I made hardly any money doing it, and it was extremely unreliable in my experience, so I don't think I would make it my main job, just because it would create a lot of anxiety. That said, something in communications might work.

I worked at an archive for a while, and while I didn't want to make a career out of it because it wasn't at all exciting, it was interesting and I enjoyed it while I was there, because I was reviewing historical documents.

Because of my interest in foreign policy, to become more competitive in that field, I'm planning on pursuing a little more training in either data/statistics or public health, to make myself a stronger candidate.

I enjoy writing a lot and I would like to write a novel, but I'm not counting on making it big or anything like that. I just want to write a good book for personal fulfillment.

Besides all that, growing up I had some outdoorsy, environment-related jobs that I enjoyed a lot, including building hiking trails.
 

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Tutoring college math was satisfying in the sense that I was using my natural talent and felt that I was accomplishing something. I didn't love it, however, and youth was the main reason I could stand it; I couldn't handle it now.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm basically an INFP, and I'm still figuring out a career. I think I've discovered a lot about what I want out of a job, through doing lots of jobs I don't like.

I'm pretty deep on the F side, so you may or may not relate to this, but I've found that it's extremely important to me that I have a fulfilling career. Part of this is probably due to how idealistic I was growing up, about what I'd do when I grew up.

I honestly hate the job I'm at right now, which is unfortunate because it's not a bad job. I'm basically doing customer service, with a product I don't care about. I like talking to customers, but I find the job pointless. The job I hated the most that I ever did was working at a thrift store, because selling junk to people was just very bleak.

I have a master's in foreign policy, and I've found work related to that extremely rewarding. I did development work in Africa and Asia for a few years, mostly in public health and grant writing, and I loved doing that, exploring different cultures and feeling like I was doing meaningful work. I intend to get back to something relevant to foreign aid.

I like teaching, and I would enjoy teaching a subject I find really interesting, like social studies or English. That said, if I become a teacher, I think I'll feel like I'm settling, since I always wanted to do something more ambitious growing up.

I worked as a journalist for a little while, and I loved doing that. That said, I made hardly any money doing it, and it was extremely unreliable in my experience, so I don't think I would make it my main job, just because it would create a lot of anxiety. That said, something in communications might work.

I worked at an archive for a while, and while I didn't want to make a career out of it because it wasn't at all exciting, it was interesting and I enjoyed it while I was there, because I was reviewing historical documents.

Because of my interest in foreign policy, to become more competitive in that field, I'm planning on pursuing a little more training in either data/statistics or public health, to make myself a stronger candidate.

I enjoy writing a lot and I would like to write a novel, but I'm not counting on making it big or anything like that. I just want to write a good book for personal fulfillment.

Besides all that, growing up I had some outdoorsy, environment-related jobs that I enjoyed a lot, including building hiking trails.
What an amazing amount of experience - thanks so much for sharing. I have read so much about NF's but I had a light bulb moment when I got to your second paragraph. The very nature of our idealism means no job will ever feel completely right/fulfilling. Our ideal career does not exist in reality yet we keep searching for it instead of settling into a career that is as close to ideal as possible. An all or nothing attitude and perfectionist streak doesn't help either. Another piece of the puzzle solved.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Tutoring college math was satisfying in the sense that I was using my natural talent and felt that I was accomplishing something. I didn't love it, however, and youth was the main reason I could stand it; I couldn't handle it now.
I think its true that our authentic self demands more attention the older we get. Its always pushing us to respect it more and we feel that as intolerance to what we once used to put up with. Great to hear you utilized a natural talent - many people never do.
 

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My dream job is I.T. desktop support. I've been helping people with their computers and software since I was a teenager. Twenty-four years later, it's still just a hobby. Not sure why no one will hire me, I took classes at a local college and discovered I'm more knowledgeable and better prepared than most students at the end of their degree programs, but I struggle with the educational system; I find a lot of errors in the material, and if I have no practical use for something they're teaching or testing, I don't learn it. I ended up dropping out during the last course because the assignments were unclear to me and the instructor couldn't clarify them, plus we were supposed to prepare some slide show presentation on the company I was going to intern with for approval by the school, but how am I supposed to know what to present if I haven't worked for the company yet. I don't learn by reading textbooks and taking tests, I learn by having a problem and just figuring it out. The school system has let me down, and it's letting down a lot of young people today. Now the only way I'll probably ever get hired to do what I want to do is if someone I know recommends me to whatever company they're working for.

Sent from my RS988 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My dream job is I.T. desktop support. I've been helping people with their computers and software since I was a teenager. Twenty-four years later, it's still just a hobby. Not sure why no one will hire me, I took classes at a local college and discovered I'm more knowledgeable and better prepared than most students at the end of their degree programs, but I struggle with the educational system; I find a lot of errors in the material, and if I have no practical use for something they're teaching or testing, I don't learn it. I ended up dropping out during the last course because the assignments were unclear to me and the instructor couldn't clarify them, plus we were supposed to prepare some slide show presentation on the company I was going to intern with for approval by the school, but how am I supposed to know what to present if I haven't worked for the company yet. I don't learn by reading textbooks and taking tests, I learn by having a problem and just figuring it out. The school system has let me down, and it's letting down a lot of young people today. Now the only way I'll probably ever get hired to do what I want to do is if someone I know recommends me to whatever company they're working for.

Sent from my RS988 using Tapatalk
Check out Ken Robinson TEDx videos + others - for his view on the education system. Absolutely nothing wrong with getting a job via a recommendation (much more efficient). Constantly remind people you know to keep 'marketing' you to the companies they work for.
 
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My first asset were two studious I rented out. That was a pretty long time ago, but the sense of relaxation knowing I could afford food independently when ever those yieded income was pretty cool, back then.

I would do it all over again if dropped to zero. So my advice would be thinking about what problems people have and what solutions help them out. Then, marketing and positive cashflow. Minimalistic first, and then assets, assets and more assets. Adjusting the risk reward and thats pretty much it for one to afford free time.

Then do what your passion is.
 

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Mine is a illustrator, or more precisely I am working as one now. I use to dance around the idea of doing something that might please my parents or be financially more stable. But everything else left my heart and soul feeling empty and meaningless, it got to a point where i started getting depression because i was holding myself back.

I now work in illustration, its hard and there are an insane amount of hurdles that other careers i could of pursue may not of had, but you know what I wouldn't have it any other way! I love it way too much and it attends to a lot of my needs on a day to day basis.
 
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