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Discussion Starter #1
Something to steer clear of, or an honorable healthcare profession in which an INFP can counsel patients while giving them the drugs they are prescribed? Opinions, comments? I'm back to considering it again desipte me SUCKING at chemistry/math.
 

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There was an INFP Pharmacist that was a member here. She doesn't post anymore.
 

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It seems like a good profession to me.

You have to know your stuff, and be good at advising people when they have questions or concerns.

You just have to get through the horrors of chemistry, and math.:frustrating:

Good luck!! :happy:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think what i'm worried about is all my research on pharmacists shows a lot of them are so bored at work they want to kill themselves and then that the market is getting so saturated with them, there's not going to be work in a few years. As far as the few pharmacists i've actually gone into retail stores and talked to they all seem to enjoy their job.

I think what I like about it-- besides the pay -- is that unlike psychology which i'm almost done getting my second B.S. in, you get to leave work and be done thinking about it for the day. With psychology i'll always be hearing anxiety and depression on good days. severe pathology on bad days with bipolar and personality disorders.. The INFP in me of course feels its my responsibility to help these people, but I'd prefer to help people in a way that doesn't necessarily drag me into the pit as well, if that makes sense. I'm having a hard enough time trying to keep myself out of the pit on my own.

what if a pharmacy made me feel trapped in that little pharmacy box though in the store. You don't really have autonomy. ugh. my personality, lack of passionate interests, and love for money (odd for infp...but i think its because i'm broken or an unhealthy infp) are making my life rather difficult.
 

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I think what i'm worried about is all my research on pharmacists shows a lot of them are so bored at work they want to kill themselves and then that the market is getting so saturated with them, there's not going to be work in a few years. As far as the few pharmacists i've actually gone into retail stores and talked to they all seem to enjoy their job.

I think what I like about it-- besides the pay -- is that unlike psychology which i'm almost done getting my second B.S. in, you get to leave work and be done thinking about it for the day. With psychology i'll always be hearing anxiety and depression on good days. severe pathology on bad days with bipolar and personality disorders.. The INFP in me of course feels its my responsibility to help these people, but I'd prefer to help people in a way that doesn't necessarily drag me into the pit as well, if that makes sense. I'm having a hard enough time trying to keep myself out of the pit on my own.

what if a pharmacy made me feel trapped in that little pharmacy box though in the store. You don't really have autonomy. ugh. my personality, lack of passionate interests, and love for money (odd for infp...but i think its because i'm broken or an unhealthy infp) are making my life rather difficult.
Good luck if you want to get into pharmacy! It may be a good match for you. I just want to play devil's advocate. Please do not base your decision solely on my response.

I am a 2nd year pharmacy students with INFP profile thinking about switching to psychology or mental health related field. I think pharmacy is not bad but it is not the best for INFP. The majority of classmates will be ISTJ, followed by ESTJ. You won't see a lots INFP and ENFP around you. Although some school have problem-based learning, in most school, you will end up using a lots of your sensing skills in memorizing LOTS of details. However, as an INFP, I found that the big picture such as the rationale for choosing specific drugs for certain disease states extremely fascinating. You will know A LOT more about the pharmacology than many health care workers. However, in real world, you may be limited to the protocols and the mundane guidelines at where you work :( Most exams in pharm school are very detailed oriented. Whenever you study, you must read every single paragraphs "in detailed, and use a lot of sensing skills. Little opportunities to think outside the box, to get personal, and to use your imagination. You will rarely write reflective essays.

There're more options than going into retail. You can teach in pharmacy school. You can work in clinical settings or even collaratively with physicians in clinics. However, pharmacy materials are factual and detail oriented in natures. (The big pictures and the pharmacology are fascinating. But most of the time, when you give drug information, the physician and nurse practitioners won't care about your big picture stuffs behind it. For example, they just want to know about drug interactions and side effects etc)

Personally, I would rather be dragged into the pit in psychology than not dealing with the emotionality at all. My neuroticism is higher than average people so I feel the need do something that I can "feel" it.

Good things about pharmacy--- good for introvert (not much of adrenaline thing unless you work in critical care setting). It is not a the best fit for INFP in my opinion but it's ok.

Check you ennegram type also. My ennegram type is 4. One of my classmate is INFP and his ennegram type is 9 and he can tolerate pharmacy pretty well. Maybe if your ennegram is 9, pharmacy can be a good fit. I think ennegram type 9 is better at dealing with more routine tasks and can tolerate less creative and artistic field.

How about trying other fields in psychology that requires less of the personal involvement eg. cognitive sciences and neuropsychology-- or research.??? It is more abstract and less factual than pharmacy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Allegro,

thanks for the bird's eye view. Can you tell me more about your experience? Like what made you make that leap to go for pharmacy school? you said you are considering switching over into psychology? are you hating so much as to have decided you don't want to be a pharmacist? I'm interested in the whole understanding for your current choices :)

I definitely don't like adrenaline type careers because my body make an oversupply of that already for no reason.

As for my Enneagram I am a 2 - The Helper- with a score of (8)- according to the RHETI Enneagram Type Indicator. My next highest number(s) are Type 4 and 6 which are tied with each other at a score of ( 5). after that Type 5 and 9 scored equal with a total of (4). The only one I scored a 0 on was Type 8, so i guess i'm definitely not a type 8.

I like facts actually, I just have to be interested in the subject matter to care about the facts. But I like giving facts to others about things I feel I have an expertise knowledge about. lol. As far as the research concept goes, I like to do 'informational research" where I guess something like a librarian would do just looking up interesting things for hours. I'm not the biggest fan of science research involving endless APA formatted papers and statistics. Life is too difficult for making decisions like these!!
 

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Sorry for late reply

Allegro,
Can you tell me more about your experience? Like what made you make that leap to go for pharmacy school? you said you are considering switching over into psychology? are you hating so much as to have decided you don't want to be a pharmacist? I'm interested in the whole understanding for your current choices :)
I am sorry for late reply. Thanks for your interest in understanding me.

Lanntis, don’t worry too much sucking at chemistry and math. You just need to do well on the pre-requisite course to get in pharmacy school. You can get away with chemistry and math in pharm school. Majority of the stuff will be MEMORIZATION. Chemistry taught in pharmacy school will be biochemistry or medicinal chemistry with minimal calculation, which is personally more interesting than inorganic and organic chem you learned in undergraduate level. If you hate math, you will struggle with a couple class like basic pharmacokinetics.. but that’s all.
I do not hate pharmacy. I found that it is very practical. All material you learned is applicable to yourself or your loved one eg. drug information. I just think it is not the best fit for me. If you force me to continue, I probably won’t be miserable. At least, it is better than what I am doing for a living now. I think I can find some jobs in pharmacy that can fit 60% of me. But I believe that life is short and I do not plan to have family. Therefore, I have to find something that I am much more interested in. Like some INFPs, I can’t stand working 9-5 for something I am not interested in.
Ok, my rationales for considering leaving pharmacy:
1) I have been dreaming of teaching at the college level. I found out that teaching in college level involves more than just giving lectures. You have to know the material in depth and like to do the research about them. Although I would love to teach, my level of curiosity in pharmacoltherapy is not high enough. I just found it useful but I am not interested in working in the pharmacology labs or statistically comparing the efficacy of two medications. Pharmacy material is dry and is too factual with little opportunity to express myself. (I think having ennegram type 4, my need for expressiveness is high. (despite poor English as a non-native speaker/writer)
2) I am not too happy with most of my experiences in pharmacy so far. In all settings, there are some kind of routines in almost every pharmacy jobs I shadowed (research pharmacist, clinical pharmacist, retail pharmacist). Even clinical pharmacists still have to deal with the routine of dosing medication. Well, I think psychologists have to deal with routines, too, but I think it might be a bit more creative and expressive than pharmacy. Are there routines in psychology?

3) I don’t like the “mistake catching” mentality. I like to diagnose and figure out what’s wrong with patient. I think psychiatry and psychology will provide me this opportunity. Many pharmacist jobs, clinical or retail, involve this type of mentality, eg. dosing antibiotics and looking for drug interaction etc. I am working a practical and detail-oriented profession now and I can link my current experiences to pharmacy. I have serious doubt about entering another detail-oriented and task-oriented profession which involves catching mistakes without dealing much with the big picture or intuitive side. The only difference is that in pharmacy, I will work in a clean environment with fewer interruptions (maybe).
4) Like I said before, life is short. I do not plan to marry. So I am planning to marry my career or I am finding something at a higher level of satisfaction.
What are your experiences in psychology? Is it a good field for INFP? Like pharmacy, it takes years to become a psychologist and the market is saturated.
Yes, I like facts, too, but, like you, it has to be the material I am interested enough to carry on to the higher level (research, teaching). So the more important questions is “Are you “intrinsically” interested in the pharmacy material?” I think you can take pharmacology course at an undergraduate level. That’s what I am doing now. Taking some psych courses in undergrad to confirm if I am really interested in psychology. As of right now, I am 60% confidence that I will drop out. It sucks being an INFP coz I can see pros and cons in everything and like to leave the options open.
Have a great Memorial Holiday!
 

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Lanntis,

I read some of your other posts. I can see you point that there are pros and cons to anything. It is difficult to choose. When you aain something, you will lose something. And one thing, nothing is going to be certain. The supply, demand, salary may changes. Even your preference can change but I think it is relatively more stable than the external factors
 

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Hello, I've been reading your post and am also interested in doing pharmacy. Similar to your situation I'm worried about how boring this job can be and am afraid that I wouldn't like it. It interests me because of the pay and I seriously love chemistry:tongue: and also the job security, considering that I wouldn't have to worry about not getting a job because of the aging population, maybe after earning enough money I can go on and do another degree in fine arts just for interests:mellow:

I would really like to hear more from other INFP pharmacist and how they feel about their jobs too. Looking forward in this thread seems there are rarely any other post involving pharmacy and INFPs:sad: seems like they just don't matched? thx..
 

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(Pharmacist?...consider this first)

I have to somewhat restrain myself on this question to avoid sharing all of my thoughts on the topic... Yes, I think an INFP could be a good pharmacist, but do I think it's a good choice? With my personal views, no. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, the third leading cause of death in the United States is doctors, that is, death that is caused by the activity or therapy given by a doctor. Out of the 250,000 deaths per year, 106,000 die from the negative effects of the drugs they are given, many of them because the wrong drugs were chosen, or unsafe drugs were prescribed. The pharmacist is not responsible for choosing the drug, and so they are certainly not accountable, but they are the middle-man in the process. I used to like the idea of being a pharmacist, but once I learned these things, I didn't want to any longer. Convention medicine, even though many remarkable and wonderful things happen because of it, is very very imperfect and dangerous, because little is known about many of the drugs, and many of the times a doctor can only prescribe with their best guess according to the information they receive from a patient.

I myself have experienced terrible effects from prescription drugs. I was given paxil, prozac, and effexor on separate occasions, and they devastated my mind, but the doctor kept wanting to try things, and I tried benzodiazepines, which were also horrible, and I gave up on these drugs, thankfully. This very year my (new) doctor found that I was very deficient in vitamin D, and wanted to prescribe me 50,000 IU, a massive dose. Because it was winter, and with my naturopathic mindset, I said, "I haven't had sun exposure for months. Won't it correct itself once I get into the sun?" He said, "No, not with this level of deficiency." And he began to cite the recent medical journals, telling me about what large doses of vitamin D can do, and so forth. He prescribed it, but I didn't take it. Then a few months later I came back, told him I hadn't taken it, and said to him, "If you test my levels, and I'm still low, I'll take it." He agreed, I was tested, and VOILA, I was in the optimal range, and he was astounded, and I was not. It was a GOOD thing I did not take that 50,000 IU, because with a combination of the sun I was receiving, plus that, I would have had potentially damaging levels of vitamin D, which is possible.

I share these things, knowing that there will continue to be prescriptions, and pharmacists, and conventional medicine, but personally deciding that if I contribute to the medical world, I want to make my contribution to naturopathy, which has been unneccessarily vilified by mainstream medicine, but when handled responsibly and knowledgeably, helps many people.

Why do I think Naturopathy is a good fit for an INFP?...
Because naturopathic medicine is much more directed at seeking out and tracing to the fundamental causes of illness, and finding therapies that help to aid the body in the process of healing, to supply what is lacking, boost the body's own abilities, all in harmony, rather than to manipulate the body and brain with alien substances produced in laboratories that have an effect on the body's other systems and cause imbalance, which leads to other medications to relieve those symptoms, which leads to... etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
::casts a ressurection spell on this thread:: pharmacy/medicine and INFP's....go!
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Over a year later and I'm still debating pharmacy or hell.. even med school. Finished my second degree in psychology. Undergrad classes are fun, grad research and often intangible results of psychological therapies are not fun. psychologist pay is crap for the amount of years invested in education (usually 7+ after bachelors) and the saturation of the field worsens as social workers and masters therapists are hired for less pay and same job as the phd psych.

Would still love to hear from any of the rare pharmacy or medical or healthcare INFPs out there.
 

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Something to steer clear of, or an honorable healthcare profession in which an INFP can counsel patients while giving them the drugs they are prescribed? Opinions, comments? I'm back to considering it again desipte me SUCKING at chemistry/math.
I think it's a poor career choice for an INFP. You'll spend 97% of your time putting pills into bottles, printing the label, etc and very little time advising patients. There are extreme time pressures and the work has virtually no intrinsic value. INFP's need to have meaning purpose in their work. Pick something else like Psychology.
 

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My recommendation is to stay away from it. I share the view of 'Dissident' psychologist Bruce Levine, that the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry on the whole have no real interest in truly helping people, but instead in forcing them to adapt to a situation that should not be adapted to and increasing profits. If you're truly interested in health and wellbeing I recommend looking into alternatives, such as nutrition and eastern medicine.

 

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Personally, I think pharmacy is kind of soul-less relative to other careers within the medical field. I suppose you can extrapolate some positive meaning out of it since you're treating patients of their "ailments". At the same time, a pharmacist rarely has real personal contact with who they're treating. You fill prescriptions that were authorized by someone else, you dispense it, they pay for it and leave, rinse and repeat.

Good money, though.
 
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