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After doing a little bit of searching, I wasn't quite able to come up with the answers I'm looking for and decided to make a new thread.

I know there are a few INFP programmers out there and I'm looking for a few tips on learning to code. My interests span from web design to app creation to maybe stand-alone Windows software.

First and foremost, I'm really curious if there were any books or resources any of you read that really connected with you. I remember having a Java textbook in college and struggling with it a bit.

Second, is there any language you suggest starting out with? I already know HTML and, generally speaking, I can edit PHP to customize it to do what I want. I'm really looking to step it up and devote myself to programming for all the software projects I'm constantly thinking of but don't know how to make. I don't want to do this as a job, just a hobby to make some very advanced websites and webapps (maybe iOS apps in the future) for now.

Third, any tips or things to be wary of? I have already read all the advantages and disadvantages to programming compared to the typical xSTJ-type person. What I'm looking for is ways to "get it" better than most textbooks teach it. It feels like they are mostly aimed at people who think a bit differently than I/we do.

Ultimately, I always feel very frustrated when I have tried to learn in the past, so maybe some tips will help me grasp it all a bit better this time around. Thanks for any help :)
 

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If you really want to code, then start doing personal projects that mean something to you.

I taught myself design, HTML and the first project that I did that meant something to me was a swing dancing site for Colorado. This was before CSS and I had to do iFrames and single pixels for positioning. I love that project because I was a huge swing dancer back then. I had people using the site. I had got free tickets to shows. It made me want to make the site better so I learned more. It was also my swing dancing site that got me a gig designing intranet sites which was enough of a portfolio to get my first real design job at 29, 3 years after I started teaching myself at 26.

Around 29 years later, I started a site called World Short Track around short track speed skating. It's still up but hasn't been updated in a decade. That was the project that I used to teach myself ASP and to read and write to a database. I built an LLC around that project was able to go to the World Short Track World Cups as press, met all the Olympic skaters and got to travel to Europe and write that off as a tax write off.

Learning to code is only fun if you build a project around something that interests you and solves a need so other people visit your site and give you feedback. Otherwise you're going to find programming boring and pointless without the human interaction.

Today, I program in C#. At my dayjob, I program the customer service system for a multi-million dollar company. It was choice between Sun or Microsoft and I choose Microsoft. I also taught myself PHP. Most of the stuff I freelance is done in PHP.

If you want to learn programming, find a project that will reward you beyond programming.

Also, one of the biggest reasons I started INFP Blog was so I could learn Wordpress design and code themes. If I'm learning something new, there's got to be something meaningful behind it to drive me to learn.
 

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I have a computer science minor, but I haven't done programming in any serious capacity outside of class... until just recently.
I have dived into the deep end doing iOS development in Objective C, developing a game with my friend. I think the key to learning any skill is to tackle challenges at the appropriate level of difficulty... right beyond what you are comfortable with... but not so challenging as to be impossible. When I'm done with this either two things will happen.... either the game will be successful enough to develop more games or apps... or I'll have the experience to put on a resume to really attack the job market. Or maybe both will happen...

Musicians do it all the time, really diving in and learning a piece. I'm sure other artists or craftspeople do the same thing, trying to develop their skill... I think you have to view programming the same way. You need to just find a project and dive in and work towards completing it, that's one way (and probably the only thing) that school really helps with... it provides structured guide posts towards accomplishing something.

Books are good of course, but I've found most can be sort of dumb. They'll get you the basics in an overly simplified environment, but it isn't exactly what you'll see when you dive into the meat of a large project. A good book can provide the exercises to develop the skill, until you feel confident in starting that big project.

Programming is great because you can build what you are doing in chunks. You get a little something working, and then you can build a little more functionality on top... and keep on growing it. You have to view it as a creative problem solving thing... not just as a regurgitate what someone has told you is best practices without really knowing what you are doing. For me it tests my ability to follow a line of logic to the extremes, especially when I'm debugging... but I'm starting to succeed enough and develop the experience to really have the tenacity to feel that I can solve any problem in front of me.
 

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If you really want to code, then start doing personal projects that mean something to you.

I taught myself design, HTML and the first project that I did that meant something to me was a swing dancing site for Colorado. This was before CSS and I had to do iFrames and single pixels for positioning. I love that project because I was a huge swing dancer back then. I had people using the site. I had got free tickets to shows. It made me want to make the site better so I learned more. It was also my swing dancing site that got me a gig designing intranet sites which was enough of a portfolio to get my first real design job at 29, 3 years after I started teaching myself at 26.

Around 29 years later, I started a site called World Short Track around short track speed skating. It's still up but hasn't been updated in a decade. That was the project that I used to teach myself ASP and to read and write to a database. I built an LLC around that project was able to go to the World Short Track World Cups as press, met all the Olympic skaters and got to travel to Europe and write that off as a tax write off.

Learning to code is only fun if you build a project around something that interests you and solves a need so other people visit your site and give you feedback. Otherwise you're going to find programming boring and pointless without the human interaction.

Today, I program in C#. At my dayjob, I program the customer service system for a multi-million dollar company. It was choice between Sun or Microsoft and I choose Microsoft. I also taught myself PHP. Most of the stuff I freelance is done in PHP.

If you want to learn programming, find a project that will reward you beyond programming.

Also, one of the biggest reasons I started INFP Blog was so I could learn Wordpress design and code themes. If I'm learning something new, there's got to be something meaningful behind it to drive me to learn.
Great story.

I've always thought programming was more of an INTP domain. How strong is the T in you i.e. are you mildly F?
 

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As an INFP programmer I recommend that you start with C and then move on to the more abstract languages. Most programming languages are based off C and this will give you a great foundation and give you a base of knowlege that you can intuitively relate higher level concepts to like object oriented programming. For your second language I would recommend an object oriented scripting language, Python would be a good one to try.
 

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Can I ask, I want to try out programming, is it best for me to wait until I'm 16-17 when I can take a Computing course at sixth form or is it best for me - age is 14 btw - to start now?
 

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Can I ask, I want to try out programming, is it best for me to wait until I'm 16-17 when I can take a Computing course at sixth form or is it best for me - age is 14 btw - to start now?
Yes, start now. You can at least learn the basics now so that when you actually take the computing course, you'll have a better understand of the subject matter. I taught myself QBASIC at home during high school which made learning Visual Basic and Turing in class much easier. Likewise, I taught myself how to use GameMaker and its built-in programming language, which made learning JAVA and C++ in university easier.

If you really want to code, then start doing personal projects that mean something to you.
Yes. Very yes. One of my interests is video/computer games. I started with making a (poorly-programmed) game with QBASIC, which lead me to GameMaker (still using it today), my undergrad studies in game development, and shaped my motivation for my master's thesis in computer science. My interest in computer music composition has also influenced my programming career as well: namely my strength in audio programming and the topic of my master's thesis.
 
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Great thread, INFPs in programming, never made thoughts about that. Or I did wonder how my INFP self is into programming. It's my primary hobby and job and I have doing it for more than 10 years.

I can't say that a single book is the magic glue that will suddenly transform one that cannot start into a great learner. Many people are impressed by the things I am programming and their question is "Wow, did you learned these things in some book?" like there was a magic book that can cure procrastination or fear for the new or something.

I didn't started from a book, although maybe we had one or two around the house that helped me search for things like a new command in basic I didn't know. But the process was not to read the whole book and then started. I started by typing my first programs, very simple things, experimenting and when there was a problem I could look at the book. Somehow I rarely like to read books on the subject, except maybe look in single chapters for a little while to get an idea of new stuff I could try. Ok,. my dad had showed me some simple things in basic and I experimented from there. It would be good if you get a book, but if you see it makes you bored, switch to the compiler and start trying random stuff you've read.

I am wondering now how INFP plays role for a programmer. They say most programmers are lik NTJ or something (I even found a paper researching this, http://www.google.gr/url?sa=t&rct=j...14CoCg&usg=AFQjCNHCFcpDI104mihqboUGH0B9Fj5Geg , FPs are the rarest, hah we should be psychologists or something it says :). Of course are I and N helps, but F? I don't consider F as not thinking, I consider it as your emotions shadowing your logic, or maybe being more idealistic. But when you switch to programming tasks you switch, so I don't consider F as an inability to be logical, but as a preference to act on your feelings. And P? They say among others Ps are more prone to procrastination. Ask me! It fits perfectly! Then how did I found the courage to learn programming? Because I really really wanted, it was a dream! As a P, when I want something very much, I am insisting. But if there are things I Have to do them, as an obligation, but not wish or need, then it's a struggle.

In a nutshell, what others say, if you are really motivated, start your own projects, look some chapters, some examples in a book if you want, but mainly learn to love to experiment with writing your own stuff. And today, there is the internet, I don't even use books anymore, so many tutorials on how to do everything.
 

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Can I ask, I want to try out programming, is it best for me to wait until I'm 16-17 when I can take a Computing course at sixth form or is it best for me - age is 14 btw - to start now?
Start as early as you can, but make it as a fun thing for yourself, cos it can get frustrating. It depends on what you are trying to learn and pick up. The more examples you do, the more confident you will feel. The more coding patterns you develop or find, the more enjoyable you will find it. But it does take time and discipline I guess. You can get too addicted to it as well...
@Optimouse - That is interesting. I gave up low-level coding from my uni days and opted for application level configurations.

From the paper...

On the other hand, many NFs and SFs are drawn to fields like psychology and school teaching because of their concern for others; the technical aspects of computing hold little long-term attraction to them. It could be expected that some of them may find their niche in the less technical, more people-oriented aspect of software development. For example, NFs and SFs would possibly be happier as software engineers with direct user contact than they might be developing microcode for a new micro-processor
I mean, I do agree with what it said here. The people interaction element is probably what makes me want to work harder in IT. I did know that, the organisation that I work for has to make me feel "this is worth it". There is also business analysis, drawing up of diagrams which can be creative, but requires a little bit of thought processing.

There is a "framework" called Zachmann Framework, which made sense of IT and systems for me. It labels each person who uses the system into "roles" or "stakeholders". I know the roles for the ERP system areas for many years, so I am able to always put myself into their shoes and think about what they need in order to give them what they wanted. Basically, I know each person's job function and doing so, makes it so much easier to troubleshoot on the system side and give them the exact thing that they ask for.
 

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Some programming tips.

right now, when you look at mobile development you've got a few flavors:

HTML5/CSS/JavaScript. The idea behind it is that HTML5 is a standard that will be supported on many platforms and devices. it's not fully there yet, but it's a good idea to jump in now.

Mobile devices usually differ in native language, but there are some clever companies out there that have developed tools that act as a middle man so that one can program against the middle man, and the middle man figures out what that means in order to make the device do as required.

For some reason, this middle man language is usually C# .NET. then for apple devices there's objective C and for Android there is Java. the windows (phone) 8 apps can be made with either HTML5 and JavaScript or C# / VB with .Net.

Objective C is pretty hardcore, and syntax is not as easy. Java and C# look alike a lot in my opinion. So tactially I think learning c# .net is a good idea, you can easily take your skills to java, and there are books on how to look at objective C from a .net perspective.

Find a programming study group / hang out group, you get way more feedback having people look at your code than just posting and reading from forums.

I have a friend who at a young age got into a demo coding group, and he was very active, visiting different countries in Europe, doing compos/parties. Usually in the weekends once every few months, where groups from different countries would challenge each other to make impressive visual and audio effects within 48 hours. They usually ended their demos with a greeting / recognition to the other groups. The people in that scene really know how to turn computers inside out and squeeze it for performance. Once you can do that, you can do anything.

For an INFP though, make sure you relate your code to something that is in service of humanity (or at the least a tiny subset).
 

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Great thread, INFPs in programming, never made thoughts about that. Or I did wonder how my INFP self is into programming. It's my primary hobby and job and I have doing it for more than 10 years.

I can't say that a single book is the magic glue that will suddenly transform one that cannot start into a great learner. Many people are impressed by the things I am programming and their question is "Wow, did you learned these things in some book?" like there was a magic book that can cure procrastination or fear for the new or something.

I didn't started from a book, although maybe we had one or two around the house that helped me search for things like a new command in basic I didn't know. But the process was not to read the whole book and then started. I started by typing my first programs, very simple things, experimenting and when there was a problem I could look at the book. Somehow I rarely like to read books on the subject, except maybe look in single chapters for a little while to get an idea of new stuff I could try. Ok,. my dad had showed me some simple things in basic and I experimented from there. It would be good if you get a book, but if you see it makes you bored, switch to the compiler and start trying random stuff you've read.

I am wondering now how INFP plays role for a programmer. They say most programmers are lik NTJ or something (I even found a paper researching this, http://www.google.gr/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=programmers%20mbti&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CCIQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eng.uwo.ca%2Fpeople%2Flcapretz%2Fmbti-IJHCS-v2.pdf&ei=VKyjUJD1NMqJ4ATj14CoCg&usg=AFQjCNHCFcpDI104mihqboUGH0B9Fj5Geg , FPs are the rarest, hah we should be psychologists or something it says :). Of course are I and N helps, but F? I don't consider F as not thinking, I consider it as your emotions shadowing your logic, or maybe being more idealistic. But when you switch to programming tasks you switch, so I don't consider F as an inability to be logical, but as a preference to act on your feelings. And P? They say among others Ps are more prone to procrastination. Ask me! It fits perfectly! Then how did I found the courage to learn programming? Because I really really wanted, it was a dream! As a P, when I want something very much, I am insisting. But if there are things I Have to do them, as an obligation, but not wish or need, then it's a struggle.

In a nutshell, what others say, if you are really motivated, start your own projects, look some chapters, some examples in a book if you want, but mainly learn to love to experiment with writing your own stuff. And today, there is the internet, I don't even use books anymore, so many tutorials on how to do everything.
I wrote something about this in another thread, pasted here:

Given a generic INFP:

INFP strengths in programming:
1) We have Ne, which means we can take and apply examples we find of similar situations into our own code.
2) We have Fi, which means we can build good user interfaces.
3) We have good people skills and can talk to and understand hardcore programmers (a tricky thing, I tell you).

INFP weaknesses in programming:
1) You will want to fix human problems and not system problems. An example is that you will tend to fix issues that affect ease of use rather than optimizing algorithms.
2) We lack in the organization and systems building department. If you ever code with someone who is an INTJ or the likes, you will realize the shortage in your capacity to organize and manage large amounts of code.
3) If you are very good, you can solve algorithms as well as any other programmer. However, for most INFPs algorithms will be black boxes to you that you just have to assume works and plug it into your code, especially those from the pure math side of things.
4) You will need to push through the tediousness, a lot, especially because Ne has the desire to often jump from idea to idea and never finishing anything.

The pros of programming for an INFP:
1) There is a lot of diversity in what to do. You can do design work, organizational work, problem solving, thinking about human needs, idea generation, working with people, teaching people, etc, all in the same job, so if you get bored of one aspect, you can switch to the next.
2) By doing user interface design or project management, you can utilize our strengths with people and become very effective.
3) Certain areas, like web development, are high paying, in high demand, and somewhat rewarding. :p

The cons of programming for an INFP:
1) It is pretty painful to sit in front of a computer all day.
2) It is even more difficult trying to solve algorithms, trying to understand code, and trying to organize all the code in your head all day. The key word is 'all day, as in 8 hours a day'. I myself can do it enjoyably for about 2-3 hours and then the rest of the day becomes extremely stressful.
3) The programming community is full of NTs. this can also be a pro if you like it to be :)

You can be a good to great programmer, a very good project manager and a great software engineer. However, I don't think NFs shine in the areas of algorithm development, optimization and systems building.

The best way to learn is to just dive in. Think about what you want, and then your Ne and Google will guide you to tutorials and websites that describe kind of how to do it with minor adjustments needed. Follow those tutorials and make those adjustments and kabam! there's your website/game/app... in pre-beta form. :) then you need to steadily churn out all the features and issues until you feel like it meets your idealistic state of perfection, and you've just become a programmer.
 

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Programming is something I am also thinking about getting into. I've been in college for a little while, and it's getting old for me, so I'll be looking into programming. But I agree with the above; the projects have to be meaningful and done in a way that's low stress so we can learn at our own pace. Then again, I haven't gotten the kind of funding I need to be able to do it. Will be clicking the links, also. :)
 

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l wouldn't blame your F Dominance. l think the idea about F doms not being good programmers is silly. l don't really get the justification behind it. Though you may not WANT to become a full time programmer, l don't even want to.

l do get the justification for the T preference in jobs that require detached analysis. A programmer simply needs good, fast, technical skills that anyone could have among traits like a good working memory, etc that any person can possess.

l have limited experience. Can l ask what lanuages you tried to learn? l started out with Visual Basic which l just find boring lol. lt's not very widely used either.

l might suggest mysql, l learned it later and it seemed easier to start out with than VB or Java. lt's a database language but can help a beginner understand the fundamentals of programming.

All of that said, if you actually don't have a knack for it, still wouldn't blame being an INFP, it may be that you're just not a technical person or have skills in a different area. By no means will all NTs excel in it or even pick it up.

Depending on the type of programming, there can be more of an artistic approach. Especially for game programming, which requires spatial thinking skills that l lack and that ANY type could have.
 
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l wouldn't blame your F Dominance. l think the idea about F doms not being good programmers is silly. l don't really get the justification behind it. Though you may not WANT to become a full time programmer, l don't even want to.
I think it is a matter of time spent. If you are F dominant, your time spent is in a mode of thinking about people and about their needs, and to shift from that mode requires a lot of energy. Energy, focus, motivation, etc. is not an unlimited resource.

The skill level of a programmer is very much dependent on experience (or, time spent). The more time you spend, the better you will be. There is some advantage to being mathematically smart, but most programming experience is understanding through use and application and not through solving problems.

Now, there are many types of programmers, but the emblematic programmer is the NT system building and efficiency optimizing programmer. This is what most degrees in computer science focus on. This kind of programming requires you to be in Te or Ti modes, something that F dominant programmers have difficulty doing for extended periods of time. When you look at F programmers, even those who excel in math and computational theory, they, in general, do not have as much practice or capacity in the system building and algorithms field, and thus are weaker in this regard.

However, there is a growing field in programming called user interface designers, as well as the established field of software engineers. UI designers think "how can this program fit be more harmonious to users?" and software engineers think "how can this program solve a user's needs?" In both of these fields, a F programmer can contribute and probably more substantially than T programmers, although their programming solutions may need to be 'cleaned up' (made more systemitized, modular, and efficient).

Languages in the programming world reflect personality theory in certain ways. Rigid structure is an underlying philosophy of certain languages (python, perl), in sharp contrast to expressiveness as a underlying philosophy in languages like Ruby. This is a J vs P split. Also, there is the eternal debate between enforcing static typing (which is a very J-like thought), as opposed to dynamically assessing the type at runtime (a very P-like thought). However, most programming languages by definition of them being to talk to computers are stoutly in the NT department.
 

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After doing a little bit of searching, I wasn't quite able to come up with the answers I'm looking for and decided to make a new thread.

I know there are a few INFP programmers out there and I'm looking for a few tips on learning to code. My interests span from web design to app creation to maybe stand-alone Windows software.

First and foremost, I'm really curious if there were any books or resources any of you read that really connected with you. I remember having a Java textbook in college and struggling with it a bit.

Second, is there any language you suggest starting out with? I already know HTML and, generally speaking, I can edit PHP to customize it to do what I want. I'm really looking to step it up and devote myself to programming for all the software projects I'm constantly thinking of but don't know how to make. I don't want to do this as a job, just a hobby to make some very advanced websites and webapps (maybe iOS apps in the future) for now.

Third, any tips or things to be wary of? I have already read all the advantages and disadvantages to programming compared to the typical xSTJ-type person. What I'm looking for is ways to "get it" better than most textbooks teach it. It feels like they are mostly aimed at people who think a bit differently than I/we do.

Ultimately, I always feel very frustrated when I have tried to learn in the past, so maybe some tips will help me grasp it all a bit better this time around. Thanks for any help :)
W3Schools Online Web Tutorials <=== learn most of what web development needs. I also recomend learning some C++ http://www.cplusplus.com/ . The most important is to learn to think as a coder. Once you learn one language and the basics are in, the rest will follow. I also recomend learning some design, GIMP or Photoshop as well. For apps, hmmm not sure, depends who you write it for, what OS etc.. for windows I think its Visual Basic. I learned that in school and its very easy, kinda fun too.

In the beginning you can contribute to open source software and get in ouch with some of the coders there, disect other ppl's code and gain experience, write your own website and keep adding features to it. Some ppl I know learned C++ by coding for private WoW servers XP.

Hmm in addition to this I also learn network admin stuff, database administration, hardware and tinker around in basically all operating systems ^^; cus its fun.

With the arrival of HSA it would be a good idea to dig into that as well...eventually.

@ineffipy There is something called the "Holland Code". It basically tells you what you are inclined to do, what you like and what you are good at.

For example I have INVESTIGATIVE (awesome) > ARTISTIC (awesome) > REALISTIC (awesome) > SOCIAL (good) > CO)NVENTIONAL (horrendeous...) > ENTERPRIZING ( abysmal). :p my job atm involves doing a LOT of CONVENTIONAL stuff and I got a raise. It tells something about an INFP's abilities to adapt even to jobs he/she hates and sux at.

The test: http://www.roguecc.edu/counseling/hollandcodes/test.asp



Realistic—Realistic types are practical, "hands on," and like to work with things, machines, or equipment.

Investigative—Investigative types like to work with ideas and problem-solving. They tend to be analytical, intellectual, and enjoy math and/or science.

Artistic—Artistic types tend to be independent, expressive and creative. They enjoy using their imagination and creative expression in areas such as art, music, drama, or writing.

Social—Social types prefer to deal with people, and enjoy helping, informing, teaching, inspiring, counseling, or serving.

Enterprising—Enterprising types tend to be persuasive, energetic, sociable, adventurous, ambitious, and risk-taking. They enjoy leading, managing, and organizing.

Conventional—Conventional types prefer to deal with data and things. They tend to be careful, conforming, conservative, conscientious, structured, and pay attention to details. They often enjoy an office environment.
 

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I can understand that activities can be placed in the domain of NT, NF, ST and SF, because that says something about their primary and secondary cognitive process preferences. But I'm not sure if activities should be typed T or F, P or J. I can get a feel of what is meant, but that doesn't say why this is.

I think it's best to try and find which cognitive processes are used when a certain activity is or a set of activities are required. I'm sure different processes are required when you're programming in a procedural programming language vs. programming in an OOP language vs. script languages. From what I've seen, Ti is mostly used in programming. It's used to analyze the playing field, and it gets memorized very well.

The INFP stack is Fi, Ne, Si, Te. From what I understand, Fi is a judging function and Te is a judging function. And in between we have Ne and Si as perceiving functions. I Think that translates to something like Fi decides that something is good or bad and something needs to be done to change or improve on that. Ne and Si looks for possibilities and compare that with previous results. Te as a judging functions wants to organize the steps and looks for closure.

You'd agree with me that Ti is more suitable to analyse something and decide that a condition has not been met, and it needs to be. We have false, and we need to get to true. People with a Ti preference are very lean with this skill, they can single out that exact thing and work on it, after quickly proving to themselves that other factors are not in scope, because they have the complete model mapped out in their head.

I think there is a misconception about Feeling, it's not really emotion but it's that internal compass between right and wrong, good and bad, beautiful and ugly. it's very much like True and False. perhaps not as binary, but you can do the same job just by shifting your perspective from a true/false question to a good/bad. I think the latter is also more flexible; what is a method that is true? it does the job, yes. but is it faster? does it consume less resources? is it easy to understand? can it scale? can it be reused? I think those properties define a good program, based on the context that it is in.

We can deal with a very large scope of considerations in relation with a certain subject, which I think is harder for Ti preference people. I think that if we teach ourselves the same thing as Ti people do: single out that one item that needs to be worked on by proving to ourselves that other factors need to be excluded, we'd work a lot faster when we're dealing with small scope issues and then we can implement our feeling judgement as a thinking judgement. it might just be a ramp up, before we get started we walk ourselves through a process where we decide what to consider and what not, and then stick to it.

It's not as clear cut though. Programming constraints change over time, people change their minds, new features are added and perhaps that makes your code redundant or obsolete, or perhaps the new version of the API you're working with has a new feature that allows you to do something much easier or faster, but does require you to scrap a large piece of your code.

Writing software is much like writing a novel, it's just in a different language. It's the same process. You don't always know in advance how one chapter will flow into the next, you will see it happen as you write it and perhaps you will rewrite it later. it's all parts that become a whole. And if you read a novel or code, you can sometimes see the seams. OOP has this strongly in mind. it makes sure you can alter existing parts without breaking other parts that rely on this part to function.

My Holland code is IAS. I have yet to find a job in IT that matches this perfectly. I suppose it would be something like a software analyst. Talking to clients to get requirements and then discussing those with a development team and along the way make sure the software keeps in line with what the client expects.
 

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My Holland code is IAS. I have yet to find a job in IT that matches this perfectly. I suppose it would be something like a software analyst. Talking to clients to get requirements and then discussing those with a development team and along the way make sure the software keeps in line with what the client expects.
Human interface design, anything related to human and machine interaction, gesture control, GUI. In games feeling kinda helps you to get a sense for how the game will make people feel, at what crucial level should certain events happen, how the progression should feel, is the story (if there is one) any good, the speed of the game, the art, the sound and so on, does it fit together well, how is the harmony of it? Same thing goes for websites and building ANY program that is used by people. Catering to your audience is important.

There are many areas in the computer industry where one can use F, especially since the computer has stopped being just a tool for work (thou between you and me I still like my heavy non mobile full tower powerhouse :p). I'm just a beginner thou, I studied psychology and despite or BECAUSE of my Fi dominance...I didn't enjoy it. To be honest I don't get much pleasure from taking care of other people. I mainly like giving advice or solutions, but having someone depend on me strongly feels wrong and is annoying, claustrophobic and akin to being trapped.

I agree that feeling preference =/= emotions. My Holland code is IARs.
 
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