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Hi all,

Am seriously considering being an engineer, robotics/electrical/computer type stuff. I figure this is it for me, ive always had a knack for math, science and technology like computers (bit of a whiz at most aspects), electrical stuff.

Still, about 97.95% positive Ive got this diesease called INFPism (just kidding but I sometimes wonder) and am thinking this might screw it up for me. Ive sorta figured if im really into it like i think i am it shouldnt be a problem but theres no harm in posting a short thread on the 'net. Are any of you guys Engineers or like Computer Scientists, Mechatronists, etc? Im after advice before I do something crazy like commit myself to a 4 year degree.

cheers in advance guys
 

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I'm not but I hear there are people out there who are and do work in numerous NT fields. If you have a knack for it then I would suggest you do it. I think the biggest issue is whether the reality matches up to the idealistic image of the job, whether that be through income, fulfillment or excitement but there is nothing anywhere that says it can't. If you know you will like it then I wouldn't see why not.
 

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I am a pretty classic INFP (except that I have a high "Rational" quotient as well) and I spent 30 years in computers. I was in everything from working with the earliest microcomputers (the Altair and TRS80s) to mainframes. I programmed in COBOL, in FORTRAN, C, IBM Assembly Language, BASIC, Model 204 (a 4GL) and web stuff.

The good parts for me were the creativity, the continuous learning, the design, and the satisfaction of seeing the product work. The worst part is having to be in corporate settings... and the super attention to detail.

When I was programming, I couldn't stand to do it for more than 3 days in a row. Then I had to go do some design work, some specification planning with the users, or even project management. A day or two of that and I was okay to go back to programming.

If you find the right niche that exploits your particular talents, you can have a great career in IT (whether in a one-person shop or business or a big corporate environment.)

I was also doing team lead, project management, and team managing. Additionally, I was mentoring employees and conducting informal and formal training.

Last year my whole group was deemed expendable for a couple of years. So, now I have my own business coaching, mentoring, training people on career advancement, on business improvement, and on being more successful in life.

I have considerably less stress, now. (Yes, computers/programming/IT is stressful work.) I am enjoying what I do even more than my career in computers. (I always said that it was a good second or third choice for a career... for me. I never could say what the first choice should be. Now, I have a pretty good idea of it... and I am doing it.)

Your mileage will vary. Remember this... you will have 4 or 5 careers in your lifetime. Go for the ones that utilize your talents and provide psychic rewards (positive mental/emotional feedback just from doing it). If you follow those, you will be good enough in the field to command a decent (to obscene) financial reward... at least after a while.

Is that any help?
 

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Hi Mr Jones,
I thought I was INFP for a long time so I am not very functionally different. I am studying electrical engineering in school and I love it. I work as a technician and I look forward it each day. I'm excited to go to graduate school and actually do research and design. When you think about it, electrical engineering can be very very humanitarian and philanthropic which is probably more stereotypically INFP, because of the ways technology can improve lives ... and I'm not just talking about stuff like gadgets, but literally changing the way we communicate to bring people closer together and inspire peace. I'm fond of thinking that electrical engineering is about (and it's just a way of thinking about it) energy and communication, which is pretty much like the backbone of the life of a society.

But yeah, what JohntheMentor said, go for whatever lights you up. No one really commits themselves to a four year degree ahead of time because there are so many options in school. I graduated in philosophy after changing majors twice before pursuing EE. I'm like you, you know, EE isn't a very popular INFJ choice either (as far as I can tell), but I have a knack for this kind of thing and I love, just love, the feel of intuitively grasping the dynamics of systems in motion, and putting them to work in helpful ways.

Best!
 

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If you enjoy it, if you love it, go for it! All the power to you.

All I know is that I tried engineering last year at my school and it was a big mistake. I hated it. I almost lost my scholarships due to me hating the classes and subject matter so much...I just didn't have an interest. But that's just me. If you dig it, go for it! :happy:
 

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Don't see why not. I've considered being a programmer once before I realized I don't want to be on a computer all day (just personally, is all). I also have an interest in hardware, so briefly entertained being a repairer... but also wouldn't be for me.

The only thing I can see happening is not having enough of a "cause" in certain workplaces. Volunteering can definitely fill that void, though, so it shouldn't be too much of a worry.
 

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I've been a C# programmer for 5 years. Before that I was doing web design and PHP. Programming fits my life style. That's why I'm still doing it. It keeps fairly interested. It's easy and it pays well.

I find that INFPs are all over in professions. The question you have to ask is why that career? How important is work a part of your identity? If work isn't that important to how you define yourself, how much of a lifestyle investment do you want to make in it. Certain careers affect your lifestyle (ie how long you work, who your friend are). Also, you have to remember that what you like now may not be what you like in 4 years so unless you like the journey to becoming an EE, you'll feel like you've wasted your time if you change your mind later. If you enjoy the process, then even if you change your mind later, you'll feel much better about it.

They best article about careers that I can recommend is this one: Bad career advice: Do what you love | Penelope Trunk's Brazen Careerist
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys, all of you, your advice is definately the right stuff.
Unfortunately, I'm quite afraid. At the moment I'm applying for scholarships, preaching what I plan on doing with my future and can you please pay me for it. I mean, what if I get sick of it and quit? I wouldn't be the first person in my family to bum out and I would pretty much be throwing everything everyones gonna (hopefully) give me back in their faces. I dont know if I could stand doing that and if that is the case I'm gonna be back at mums with nothing.


Still, nothing more exciting has popped up so I think I'm gonna go for it. I've been studying physics and maths for the last few years and now that I see a practical application of something I excel at and quite enjoy. arghhh what a horrible time of life when you have to get into the 'real world'
 
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