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I was wondering if any of you INFPs are vegetarian? I’ve a theory that becoming vegetarian is a typical INFP thing to do, since so many of us care about nature and animals. INFPs also tend to be quite oversensitive, and I’ve a feeling that our idealistic qualities could convince some of us that slaughter is wrong.

I hope someone will share their stories or general thoughts on the subject.

I’ve been a vegetarian for half a year now. Before this, I’ve been a meat eater my whole life, mostly because it was expected and convenient. It has always bothered me thinking about how animals must die for no reason, and how cruelly they are treated. Becoming vegetarian is one of the best decisions I’ve ever made, and I’m pretty sure I’ll stay vegetarian for life. I’ve never felt as healthy and energetic as I do now, not to mention that my conscience is clean.

Becoming vegetarian have endless benefits, not only reducing animal mistreatment, but also when it comes to own health. Vegetarian diets, if put together right, can lead to improved nourishment and sense of wellbeing. Being vegetarian is good for the environment too.

I’m not trying to provoke anyone. I'm not saying that eating meat makes you a bad person. Becoming a vegetarian is a choice of lifestyle, and obviously an important personal decision. It makes me very happy when someone converts though.

Be warned; this song may have a strong impact.

 

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Honestly, I don't think it's idealistic to think that modern methods of slaughter are wrong. Most people feel that way, even if they still somehow feel compelled to eat animals. I do think that an INFP may experience higher levels of cognitive dissonance if he/she has realized s/he is somehow benefitting from the mistreatment or death of another creature. That is to say, in my experience, I have felt tormented by the realization that my actions do not reflect my values.

I have been a vegetarian in some form for five years. I am extremely sensitive to the mistreatment of any creature. it was a natural choice for me. :)
 

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Honestly, I don't think it's idealistic to think that modern methods of slaughter are wrong. Most people feel that way, even if they still somehow feel compelled to eat animals. I do think that an INFP may experience higher levels of cognitive dissonance if he/she has realized s/he is somehow benefitting from the mistreatment or death of another creature. That is to say, in my experience, I have felt tormented by the realization that my actions do not reflect my values.

I have been a vegetarian in some form for five years. I am extremely sensitive to the mistreatment of any creature. it was a natural choice for me. :)
Yeah when presented with how we eat meat, it's all cons. And then I talk to people about it and they go, "Oh well."

I cannot express how that makes me feel.

Let's go all murder people and cheat on our boyfriends and- oh well.
 

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I've been a vegetarian since I knew that meat involved killing animals at a young age and a vegan for about 10 years. I also have an INFP friend who has an identical story.

It's probably a common thing among us because of our heightened level of empathy and a propensity for valuing ethical consistency (Fi). I'm guessing there wouldn't be as many ISFP vegetarians because of their Se and the positive associations with taste, smell and textures of meat.

In any case, veganism forms a huge part of my internal identity. It's a philosophy more so than a dietary preference for me. I'm not one for talking about it openly with nay sayers because it ends up being counter-productive. So I generally keep it to myself unless someone is genuinely curious.
 

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I've stopped eating meat since I watched this video (more shocking than the Morrisey). I've posted about it elsewhere in Feb but I'll use this thread as an excuse to post it again -


Perhaps a percentage of animals are slaughtered humanely, but these are obviously not and it sickened me. Whenever I get hungry for a box of chicken and chips, these images come to mind and my appetite for meat fades away.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've been a vegetarian since I knew that meat involved killing animals at a young age and a vegan for about 10 years. I also have an INFP friend who has an identical story.

It's probably a common thing among us because of our heightened level of empathy and a propensity for valuing ethical consistency (Fi). I'm guessing there wouldn't be as many ISFP vegetarians because of their Se and the positive associations with taste, smell and textures of meat.

In any case, veganism forms a huge part of my internal identity. It's a philosophy more so than a dietary preference for me. I'm not one for talking about it openly with nay sayers because it ends up being counter-productive. So I generally keep it to myself unless someone is genuinely curious.

Inspiring story!

Vegetarianism is becoming an important part of my value system too, though I am new to this. I'm considering going vegan, even if it's a bit more complicated and involves a slight danger of malnourishment. I'll just have to learn how to make good dinners with lentils and tofu :)

I understand completely why you don't usually talk openly about veganism. The few times I've tried discussing it, some close minded meat eater ALWAYS turned it into an argument. Ending with him/her saying "well, I like to eat beef anyway", and me almost crying.
 

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I must not have Fi :(

But seriously, I don't understand it, and I definitely want to understand it. I am so puzzled over this ability to relate to / empathize with animal cruelty/suffering/etc.

I don't feel guilty about eating meat, but I can sort of 'feel it' when animals are hurting, I suppose. I do think I can only relate this with mammals... Insects, for instance, I have absolutely no feelings for. I'll crush that spider in my room anytime, gladly.

I've given this some thought in the past, I think the empathizing nature of Fi only works if one considers animals close to human beings. I haven't figured out why, but I don't feel humans are closely related to animals or vice versa. I 'feel' there is a distance between 'us' and 'them', just haven't been able to put it into words yet. I think Fi's idealistic nature definitely helps with being a convinced vegetarian or vegan, but only if one is already inclined to empathize with animals.
 
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Inspiring story!

Vegetarianism is becoming an important part of my value system too, though I am new to this. I'm considering going vegan, even if it's a bit more complicated and involves a slight danger of malnourishment. I'll just have to learn how to make good dinners with lentils and tofu :)

I understand completely why you don't usually talk openly about veganism. The few times I've tried discussing it, some close minded meat eater ALWAYS turned it into an argument. Ending with him/her saying "well, I like to eat beef anyway", and me almost crying.
I have vivid memories of going to dinner with my mother and other family or family friends. Now, my mother is also a vegan, but she's an ENTP, so she has no issue with telling people off for what they're eating. She used to get into fierce debates with people who were trying to enjoy their meals. Ahhh...the humiliation. As much as I appreciated her efforts and cause, people can't be coerced.

I've found the best way to inspire is to be healthy and cook for others. I've recently helped a co-worker lose a bunch of weight by suggesting a switch to mock meats and offering some recipes. He says he's never felt better.
 

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I've been a pescetarian for over six years. Not quite vegetarian, but pretty close, since I only eat fish sparingly. To be honest I actually changed my diet because I dislike the taste of most meats and it was far easier to completely cut them out of my life than to constantly fight with my parents over what I would and would not eat. I have a lot of reasons not to eat meat, but that was the one that started it.

Watching animals on factory farms suffer definitely makes me sad, though. In one of my classes we watched part of Food Inc., and seeing a chicken gasp for air on the ground because it was just too overweight to be able to function properly was heartbreaking. They do horrible things to animals in the meat industry. :/
 

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Meat is not really murder, since murder only applies to humans. The scramble for plastic is murder. Compassion for fellow man over animals anyday.

That said, I eat pretty high end, well handled meat exclusively, for health entirely. The meat industry, like most other industries, has been taken over by people who sell a lesser copy of the real deal. The only way to run them out of business is to not buy their crap. Most people look insubstantial because they don't eat enough fat, nutrients, or real food. Plain and simple.

Vegetarianism seems silly though, since many vegetarians will have eggs or fish. Those animals aren't actually animals, obviously.
 

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Meat is not really murder, since murder only applies to humans. The scramble for plastic is murder. Compassion for fellow man over animals anyday.

That said, I eat pretty high end, well handled meat exclusively, for health entirely. The meat industry, like most other industries, has been taken over by people who sell a lesser copy of the real deal. The only way to run them out of business is to not buy their crap. Most people look insubstantial because they don't eat enough fat, nutrients, or real food. Plain and simple.

Vegetarianism seems silly though, since many vegetarians will have eggs or fish. Those animals aren't actually animals, obviously.
Just want to clear something up: vegetarians do not eat fish. It's a common misconception, and unfortunately a lot of people claim to be vegetarians who eat fish or chicken, but no. And if fish aren't animals, what are they - fruit? There's a big difference between an unfertilized egg and a fish. Not trying to attack you, so I apologize in advance if I come off that way, this is just my biggest peeve as a vegetarian.
 

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I think I could pass as an INFP as I've tested one in the past, but I am a vegetarian. Have been for the past 7 years. I don't think I could touch meat again :confused:
 

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Vegetarian here - I haven't been one for long now, only about a year. Never been looking back though.
Before going full out vegetarian I for few years willingly reduced my meat intake to a minimum. I guess that may be why the actual transition to vegetarian wasn't all too harsh for me.

I'm looking forward to celebrating my first year of vegetarianism in june and will likely recap my experiences (if only for my own introspection) then.

By now, however, I feel that for some very very weird reasons I tend to get more negative than positive feedback. And being an INFP I'm not preaching my newly found lifestyle to the flock nor am I trying to change people around me either - so I have no idea what's up? It's kind of depressing, really.

I am trying to empathise and understand why people react the way they do to my decision to simply not eat animals (Yes, not just beef and pork, fish and chicken too! Duh) anymore. The jesting remarks that do rub in over time somewhat, as well as the actual discussions where I may end up having to, for instance, defend my decision to have tofu in a sausage form ("You're a vegetarian, why do you feel you have to eat tofu that looks like meat?!") when everyone at my workplace is having a sausage day for lunch - things like that. I really don't know what it is. Perhaps it's because most (everyone??!) know that industrial livestock farming is happening and that it is not ideal and if someone around them suddenly decides to not be involved with all that anymore it is as though a mirror is being held to their face forcing them to reflect on their own choices? Is it that?? *shrug*
It's all a super touchy topic so I tend to steer clear of being vocal about it as much as I can.

Anyway, I like my nourishment the way it is now, both for my personal physical fitness AND personal moral concepts.
On top of that ever since becoming vegetarian I have been spending more time in the kitchen actually MAKING my own food instead of having finished products make themselves. It's a fun activity for me that feels as though it may be good for me spiritually, too. :)

Peace!
 

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I'm currently a pescetarian (fish but no meat). I went completely vegetarian about two years ago for both ethical/environmental reasons and because I thought it could help me develop a healthier relationship with food (I've had an eating disorder for 12+ years), but I had to give that up because of some other health issues. I was relying heavily on dairy and soy as my main sources of protein, and I had a bad flare-up of a rather unexplainable fibromyalgia-like syndrome that I've had off-and-on since my early 20s. I discovered it was heavily triggered by the dairy I was eating, so I cut that out. I'm also mildly allergic to soy, so I can only eat that in small quantities; same goes for lentils. And I couldn't substitute any type of nuts, because I have a severe -- as in, life-threatening, anaphylactic shock-type -- allergy to all nuts and peanuts. Anyway, I decided to start eating fish again so I could meet my protein requirements. I also eat eggs. I'm not sure yet if I'll just stay pescetarian or possibly start eating meat again someday... I'd prefer not to, I suppose. I wish I was still able to be a vegetarian and get the protein I need, but it doesn't seem like that's a possibility.
 

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Just want to clear something up: vegetarians do not eat fish. It's a common misconception, and unfortunately a lot of people claim to be vegetarians who eat fish or chicken, but no. And if fish aren't animals, what are they - fruit? There's a big difference between an unfertilized egg and a fish. Not trying to attack you, so I apologize in advance if I come off that way, this is just my biggest peeve as a vegetarian.
haha, if you consider this an attack... ;p
I bet it peeves you. I don't know if you understood my sarcasm from my post. I was criticizing 'vegetarians' for having a double standard, whereby the only 'real meat' is meat with a face. Cute cows, piggies, whatever. However, I think eggs are obviously meat too. If you are a vegetarian, how can you eat an egg, fertilized or not, and still call yourself a vegetarian? I think you're kidding yourself by saying just because the egg would go to waste anyway, you are somehow exempted from your self-imposed duty of not eating meat. If you are saying that, anyway...
I'm not saying I disagree with vegetarians eating eggs btw. Animal proteins are optimal, no doubt about it, especially eggs!
 

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Just want to clear something up: vegetarians do not eat fish. It's a common misconception, and unfortunately a lot of people claim to be vegetarians who eat fish or chicken, but no.
I think it's to do with upbringing in certain circles. 'Meat' is somehow labelled differently to 'fish' and so when someone says "I don't eat meat", those people who don't know any better assume it means they eat fish (or possibly poultry).

This happened when my mum and I went for lunch. She's a veggie, and she asked what vegetarian stuff they had on the menu "I don't eat meat".

Guy: erm, we have chicken
Mum: I don't eat chicken, I'm a vegetarian
Guy: erm, how about fish and chips?
Mum: No, I am a vegetarian, I don't eat animals!

I couldn't stop laughing. Unfortunately, I don't think you could blame the guy because it seemed that he didn't know any different. It seems education is at fault really.
 
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