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Let's say an INFP is working together with an ENTJ on a project, what recommendations would you give the ENTJ to create a better working environment?
 

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try to keep an open mind. allow for multiple possibilities when seeking a solution rather than having one already set in stone. try to present your ideas as offerings or suggestions. turn it into a dialogue that allows for both of your input equally. both are perfectionists in their own ways, so try not to over-analyze, over-worry or place too much pressure on yourself or your partner and trust that the project will turn out successful even if maybe it morphs throughout the process from the exact vision you had when you started out.
 

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both are perfectionists in their own ways, so try not to over-analyze, over-worry or place too much pressure on yourself or your partner and trust that the project will turn out successful even if maybe it morphs throughout the process from the exact vision you had when you started out.

That's actually super helpful, thank you. The only difficult part is carrying out that advice.
 

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Another several points that may be helpful to bear in mind:

1. Double-check what you assume is agreed upon, and what you believe the INFP is happy with. ENTJs can be so decisive, and so direct and outspoken, and INFPs so reflective and so harmonious and internal, that if the ENTJ doesn't hear any objection, he might assume that the INFP agrees and is on the same page. He may not be (either happy or on the same page) but he simply not have spoken up.

2. Remember that ENTJs tend to focus (quite successfully) on, and be motivated by, objective and strategic benefits (earning money, gaining victory, etc.). INFPs, on the other hand, are more often truly motivated by things less objective and strategic--things like deeply held values, personal devotion, harmony, making a difference in others' lives, etc.

3. Somewhat related to the above, you'll get the best out of an INFP if you treat him warmly--smile, be gentle and kind with him, ask how the people in his life are doing, care (or at least do your best impression of caring!).

4. ENTJs tend to be very good at managing time, and INFPs tend to be poor at doing so. Talk about this (1-on-1), preferably in a humorous way--and not by criticizing or being harsh. Instead, the two of you should just accept that time management is likely more your strength than his, and come up with ways (gentle and respectful) in which you can help him on time management for the good of the project.

5. For every critical thought or "shoot-down" of his ideas, give him two compliments, or find 2 good ideas to praise. ENTJs don't need a lot of praise and appreciation compared to what INFPs need. INFPs take criticism of their ideas personally, and if an INFP feels consistently criticized, he may shut down or suffer from burnout.

Okay, 'hope that's of help.
 

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My father is an ENTJ and we clash many times. More than one time he treats me like a student that needs to be pushed in the right direction, which doesn't necessarily rub me the wrong way because I know he's only doing what's best for me. But... yeah. Without proper consideration we can really clash.

Anyway, that's not helpful at all! AgnosticWriterINFP has very good advices, so I trust they will work well for you and your INFP.

Good luck!

(Oh, try not to act intimidating for all the wrong reasons because it'll turn them off instantly)
 

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Something I've learned from experience with an ENTJ friend:

If the INFP seems reserved, and you're trying to break him/her out of their shell a bit, don't do so by using objective criticism, or critiquing everything that they do. It will only make the INFP less likely to confront anything, because of fear of being judged or so as to avoid conflict and more potential criticism. The INFP will feel best, and perform best if they do it their own way.

If you absolutely have to remark about their performance, do it in an honest caring way. Make sure they know they're appreciated and a valued part of the team.

Example:

Let's say the INFP is being slow at completing a task. (Preferably) After the task is over, tell them what a great job they did, if not on that project, how well they do overall. Then say something like you're going to start buckling down on getting things done more efficiently, and that their performance is great, but that you're going to start pointing out areas to do better in, and that goes for all employees. Then say something like you know objective criticism isn't always the best thing to hear, but that in order to perform better, you feel that areas of improvement must be addressed. And it's true, if no one improved on areas of which they don't perform optimally, then no greater change can come.

I realize this is all long, and somewhat circulatory and repetitive, but the point is to sugarcoat it. Being direct in criticism can hurt the INFP, even if it is a more efficient way of saving time and energy, because INFP's tend to not rationalize the problem and think "oh yeah, I do need to do that better," they rather are more likely to take it more personally and think they're contributions to work are unappreciated. Often, the INFP already knows if they have a problem area, and any external reference to it will only bring them down. So don't be blunt and to the point with criticism, be nice and encouraging, as if they're already doing great, and that they're appreciated, but that the company as a whole has to do better.

Don't raise the standards of the INFP, raise the standards of the company. If the INFP really values the company, they will do their best to succeed to it's levels, so as the company can be successful. If the INFP doesn't value the company or really care about their work, then you must make it so where they do. A tip on doing so is making them feel like the company needs them in order to maintain harmony, as all INFP's strive for this. Even if an INFP doesn't value what the company stands for, it is others of which INFP's wish to please and help advance. Once you have established a need for the INFP's commitment to the company, and the INFP has recognized this need being for the good of the people, then you have an impressive and creative force working for you that's very hard to come by. If they believe in a purpose, nothing will stop them from obtaining it's success. That is the secret of the INFP.

I know all this because I am an INFP that has worked in retail for two years, and am one of the stores most valued workers due to my perseverance in pleasing others, and while I may not agree with the company's obvious policy of taking hard earned money from hard working individuals, I strive for the companies excellence, because I believe in the people that work for it. In fact, I am at my happiest at work, because it has become something I believe in.

Also recognize that if the INFP seems to be having a bad day, that they don't have the best abilities at masking their problems at times. Don't try to address this inefficiency if it's obvious they're not doing to good. Ask them if they're okay, and even if they say yes - they're probably just trying to please you and maintain harmony - be gentle with them and work with them especially hard that day to make sure they know that they're appreciated. Objective criticism will only make an INFP feel worse if they're having a bad day.

Hope this helps!
-Seth.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Another several points that may be helpful to bear in mind:

1. Double-check what you assume is agreed upon, and what you believe the INFP is happy with. ENTJs can be so decisive, and so direct and outspoken, and INFPs so reflective and so harmonious and internal, that if the ENTJ doesn't hear any objection, he might assume that the INFP agrees and is on the same page. He may not be (either happy or on the same page) but he simply not have spoken up.

2. Remember that ENTJs tend to focus (quite successfully) on, and be motivated by, objective and strategic benefits (earning money, gaining victory, etc.). INFPs, on the other hand, are more often truly motivated by things less objective and strategic--things like deeply held values, personal devotion, harmony, making a difference in others' lives, etc.

3. Somewhat related to the above, you'll get the best out of an INFP if you treat him warmly--smile, be gentle and kind with him, ask how the people in his life are doing, care (or at least do your best impression of caring!).

4. ENTJs tend to be very good at managing time, and INFPs tend to be poor at doing so. Talk about this (1-on-1), preferably in a humorous way--and not by criticizing or being harsh. Instead, the two of you should just accept that time management is likely more your strength than his, and come up with ways (gentle and respectful) in which you can help him on time management for the good of the project.

5. For every critical thought or "shoot-down" of his ideas, give him two compliments, or find 2 good ideas to praise. ENTJs don't need a lot of praise and appreciation compared to what INFPs need. INFPs take criticism of their ideas personally, and if an INFP feels consistently criticized, he may shut down or suffer from burnout.

Okay, 'hope that's of help.
I really appreciate this. I'm tempted to laminate it and entitle it "INFP Etiquette".
 

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I'll try to make it a bit simpler for ENTJs. Hopefully. :laughing:

First, take a breath before you lay into us. Breathe, rethink, THEN speak. I know how hard this is. This is important in the communication and accomplishing your goal.

Second....LISTEN. INFPs have great ideas, just like you do. Believe me, together, you can make brilliant things happen!!
If you can't handle the feelings and what you call mush and gush, try to pull the details and thoughts out from in between the emotions. Make that a task or challenge for you. If they're afraid to talk to you, use your wonderful energy and charm to get them into it!! You have a great ability to lead and inspire, if you just ease up on the intensity.
Make the work or project a secondary challenge, and make working successfully with the INFP the primary challenge to accomplish. You love challenges.
Let them know they helped. You'll get more out of them.
*****Dont argue! Arguing fuels you. It exhausts us. We will if it's important to us, but we're exhausted afterward. Then you will have an inefficient contributor.
Last, show some reserve. I know that's hard. If you have an opinion that's negative(judgement) just keep it to yourself. If you have to critique or must say something, try to make it constructive, positive and thoughtful. Remember the breathing thing.

I personally have found ENTJs to be some of the most intelligent, productive, inspiring people I know. Use those qualities to pull out what you need from the INFP. We want to get along with you and everyone, so we'll automatically try if you ask.
 
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