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So, tomorrow I have my first interview and I am extremely nervous. It's for a job as an assistant in the office of student activities at my college.

I was hoping to get some tips from other INFPs. I can't imagine interviews being something that INFPs really enjoy at all. So, how to you deal with that? What are some of your experiences with job interviews?

Additionally, I know that most employers are probably looking for more extroverted employees; so, how do you get around that or sell your introversion?

Thanks! :happy:
 

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I went to and completed a job training program that also dealt with interviews, so I have some experience on the matter. ;O

First thing I will say is that there's NO WAY you'll ever be able to completely remove your anxiety. I'm sure you know this but I wanted to say anyway .___.

Second, as funny as it might be, I suggest taking deep breaths before the interview. Apparently there's a certain of doing this that helps to lower your anxiety but I never mastered it. .-. I think deep breaths in general will at least help.

Third, make sure that your posture isn't scrunched up. This used to be a big problem for me, my shoulders would always be higher than they should be, almost like I was cold. Anyway, just be aware of your posture and try to adjust it accordingly without being so tight...

Fourth, eye contact. It's important and such. Try not to daydream during the interview .-.

Ummm, I know tons more things besides the obvious, but I'll keep it simple: Be serious, be determined, and go in there knowing you'll get the job. Oh yeah, if you get a nice interviewer, then your chances skyrocket really high.

Now...as for employees possibly looking for more extroverted people, I find using passion to be the best way to get around this. Not acting overly emotional, but just showing it through determination. Make sure to put emphasis on your strengths and such, you have to differentiate yourself from the crowd so that they hire you. Little things do show volumes about you in interviews, and I feel that's our greatest advantage.

Good luck.
 

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Depends on the job, but for the most part.

- Extra resume,
- A professional briefcase or bag of sorts, also be sure to have a pen and something to write on. Whatever you write on, make sure it's not crumbled or just crappy looking. All about professionalism!
- Dress appropriate (based on job). BLUE is considered a color of trust and calmness.
- Avoid fidgeting, this is one of the worst possible things you can do.
- Tilt your head a little when talking to people, it shows sincerity.
- Try to maintain eye contact if you can, if you don't know how one trick is to count blinks, but if you're really not the type don't try to force that so soon tomorrow. -- Eye contact will make you come off as more intellectual and confident.
- If the above is a problem, consider talking with your hands (this will help you avoid fidgeting too).
- Consider bottled water to use as a prop when you need time to think about a response. Do not make noise with it though.
- Be prepared with questions for them
- Do your homework, look up their website and some of their future goals and inquire about those goals or how they align with your own.
- Name drop if you can, if you know someone within the company, drop their names even if they're not super close to you.
- Don't ever put down past employers, regardless of what they did.

Be sure you can answer these questions (taken from my university -> workforce transitioning course).
http://www.gadgetglaze.com/upload/1285623283.jpg
http://www.gadgetglaze.com/upload/1285553352.jpg

Blah, i could go on forever. The general idea though, is the more you plan for every possible scenario, the more confident you'll feel. The fact that you even have an interview speaks volumes.
 

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Don't follow advice from non-infp interview counsellers. I find their advices tend to be bullshit, and generally out of touch with reality; maybe what they say used to have some truth/value 10 years ago.

It's really simple, I'll make it easy for you:

Your first interview will fail,
Your second interview will be less of a fail
You'll probably do good in your third interview onwards.

Consider the first couple of interviews to be like adventures/experiments, because that's what they are. My first interview was a disaster in a way, but I actually felt good after it was over; I thought I did good. It's only a couple months after it that I realized what a fail it was :tongue:

Don't try to wear a different personality type, but focus on your strengths: show that you're laid-back, friendly, that you're open to possibilities, you like learning and experiencing new things, etc.
 

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I don't know, I just try to get through it. I get the feeling I'm really bad at interviews, like epically bad.
 
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if you did the research of the job then give them a really good reason why you would like the job pertaining to it's roles.

my first and interview was a group thing with more than one applicant that was better coz I could get the answer I knew in and other people gave the duff ones.

good luck
 

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have some fun with it. pretend like you just heard the funniest joke in the world, and you can't hold it in. it might help loosen you up.
 

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Best advice for any situation like this: BE YOURSELF!

Seriously, if you are out of your comfort zone, you will be insecure. If you know who you are, you will do well. I thought this throughout my last interview, and suddenly making presentations, or being interviewed by a panel was not nerve wracking. It was just me talking and telling them who I am. Relax and be yourself.
 

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I hate job interviews! But unfortunately have gone on many in my life. I'm not sure it's something I'll ever get used to but the more you go on the easier it gets.

I usually do some research on the company so I know what they're about, what they do, what the company culture is like and then when you're given the opportunity to ask any questions ask about some of the things you read. Then they'll know you took the time to look into the company...this has helped me land the job more than once.

And just be yourself, be honest about your strengths and what you have to offer. I think many times even though we're not as extraverted as a lot of people we come across as very warm and sincere. We can usually get along with all kinds of people and employers can pick up on that.

Dress appropriately, bring an extra copy of your resume, be a little bit early and just do the best you can!

Wishing you all the best and I hope you get the job! :happy:
 

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Seriously, if you are out of your comfort zone, you will be insecure. If you know who you are, you will do well.
That's a great way to phrase it.

I always want to explain to people why it's best to be yourself, and I end up making hairy philosophical statements that no one understands.

But that wording of yours there says it all in a short and sweet sentence that's also concrete and down to earth.

Great insight! :proud:
 

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I honestly can't help you.

The only jobs I've ever had have been seasonal... and the only one that had an interview that I actually got, was mostly due to skill (they wanted us to type 25 wpm, and I typed 105 :p) That and they were hiring people on the spot, rather than calling them back.

I've never been hired for a long-term job. I act friendly and nice, but I'm just not outgoing enough. Interviews panic me to no end, and nobody ever calls me back. I've applied at a million different places (mostly retail because that's what's there), and never got a single call from any of them.

I'm very bitter about how stupid and asinine the working world is! Nobody actually gives a damn about you, or your talents, they just want some dumbass who can act a certain way (even though they're a jerk and actually do a terrible job at their work). And people who are nice and actually good at their job and acting in the way required get absolutely no respect.

Sooo, hopefully I can make a living working for myself. :unsure:

At least I have abilities that could be marketable, I don't know how I would survive in this world if I didn't.

All this coming from a 21-year-old who probably doesn't know a damn thing about what she's talking about...
 

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I honestly can't help you.

The only jobs I've ever had have been seasonal... and the only one that had an interview that I actually got, was mostly due to skill (they wanted us to type 25 wpm, and I typed 105 :p) That and they were hiring people on the spot, rather than calling them back.

I've never been hired for a long-term job. I act friendly and nice, but I'm just not outgoing enough. Interviews panic me to no end, and nobody ever calls me back. I've applied at a million different places (mostly retail because that's what's there), and never got a single call from any of them.

I'm very bitter about how stupid and asinine the working world is! Nobody actually gives a damn about you, or your talents, they just want some dumbass who can act a certain way (even though they're a jerk and actually do a terrible job at their work). And people who are nice and actually good at their job and acting in the way required get absolutely no respect.

Sooo, hopefully I can make a living working for myself. :unsure:

At least I have abilities that could be marketable, I don't know how I would survive in this world if I didn't.

All this coming from a 21-year-old who probably doesn't know a damn thing about what she's talking about...
My only advice is retail is likelynot a good industry for u. I hated it.

I have an interview coming very soon but i guess interview tips are applied to INFPs as much as anyone?
No specific INFP advice?
 

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This advice may not work for you, but it might, I find it's all about head faking myself out...if that makes sense...don't worry about being "good enough" for them. Worry about them being "good enough" for YOU. You don't want to work at a dysfunctional place...believe me, in the long run, a "bad" interview could be your biggest blessing in disguise EVER. For instance, one of my worst interviews was in front of a big interviewing committee and it was stressful! LOL But, I got all kinds of bad vibes from the place from the second I walked in and one of the interviewing questions was:
"What would you do if somebody accused you of making a mistake that you didn't make?"
I told them confidently/humously I probably DID make that mistake..and laughed but inwardly was thinking... "Is that what goes on around here?"
I didn't get hired for that one...but ya know what....I'm freaking GLAD....
I've had good interviews....I've had bad interviews....generally...the interviews where >>>I<<< felt comfortable with the interviewer were the ones I got hired for...it was a good match, and we both felt it.
Good luck INFP, and remember....make sure THEY are good enough for YOU!!!!!:wink:
 

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Two things in particular helped me. One is to dress well. It's not just to impress them. If YOU are impressed by what you see in the mirror, you'll feel more confident at the interview. The other is passion. Find something about the job that excites you, and passion can flow naturally.
 

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I've been having PhD interviews that I know I'm really qualified for, but I get in there and burst into sweats, go read in the face, start talking crap and get really embarrassed. It's completely the opposite to how I am with normal people. As a consequence, I've been rejected every time even though I'm published in the field!

It seems like no matter how much i prepare this happens....
 

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I went to job interview yesterday and it didn't went as well as I had hoped. These were very helpful for future, thank you.
 

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This advice may not work for you, but it might, I find it's all about head faking myself out...if that makes sense...don't worry about being "good enough" for them. Worry about them being "good enough" for YOU. You don't want to work at a dysfunctional place...believe me, in the long run, a "bad" interview could be your biggest blessing in disguise EVER. For instance, one of my worst interviews was in front of a big interviewing committee and it was stressful! LOL But, I got all kinds of bad vibes from the place from the second I walked in and one of the interviewing questions was:
"What would you do if somebody accused you of making a mistake that you didn't make?"
I told them confidently/humously I probably DID make that mistake..and laughed but inwardly was thinking... "Is that what goes on around here?"
I didn't get hired for that one...but ya know what....I'm freaking GLAD....
I've had good interviews....I've had bad interviews....generally...the interviews where >>>I<<< felt comfortable with the interviewer were the ones I got hired for...it was a good match, and we both felt it.
Good luck INFP, and remember....make sure THEY are good enough for YOU!!!!!:wink:
This was interesting point. When I had job interview two years ago, the interview went really, really great. I was very qualified for the job, social and managed to ease the interview by cracking few funny jokes.

In the end of the interview, I said that I have another job interview later at the day, and will consider the work. They called me back and were almost begging me to come at the work. Kind of odd how playing hard-to-get comes handy at times - people seem to want what they won't seem to get.
 

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The very first interview seems like a tough situation but when it ends there is a relief. Like, finally get over with this, let's go back to normal life.

One says, you get used to it. Well,. I am used to but only slightly. The motto that something that doesn't kill you make you stronger, I don't think it's entirely true. Another saying is that what really happens is that you learn to accept the pain but the pain doesn't dissapear much. Where pain is that feeling that you would give everything to not be in this situation.

But it's not that hard. Interviews can still freak me out a bit for few days before that, yet I am saying to myself "Come on, you've done it already many times!" or "I am not going to spoil my day anymore like the other times" (the other nth times I was again in an interview).

In my first interview in 2008 I was very lucky. I was scared like hell, I bet it was visible, yet they hired me (I had presented some personal work). Then, several years later when my skills are much better, I have more experience in my cv, got my master in the subject I did for hobby before (programming) and am less stressful (but still it might show) and have more experience with interviews, somehow I went through more than 10 in about 1 year and I got very unlucky. I can't figure why the hell! Maybe it's the crisis? They don't hire so easilly any more? Am I doing something wrong I didn't do in the first time when I was so inexperienced?

Just so you know. One could have your first interview and be lucky. It was a good start for me. The worst thing would be that the 10+ failed interviews would be in the start (for most it migth be) and I never got the opportunity to even have the experience of a job for a start.

Sometimes I am so infuriated I want to start home work, self programming projects like in android or something and see if I can make a living with this. It's bad and it's even more bad for sensitive or introverted people. Other than that, I liked some of the INFP suggestions. Being yourself, it's hard, but it comes with acceptance. If I do little mistakes in interviews I laugh about, inside or outside, trying to get rid of the negative thoughts. I am trying to change the view, because if I don't get the job, I don't want to have a bad day. You could slowly created a feeling like you don't need them, like you just came to meet them and see what they are doing and also discuss what you can do, not being there to be tested but if there is a test then it's just a game you will try to play. It's hard to reach, usually I feel the opposite..
 

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Try and appeal to the interviewer's humour a little as well. If you could try to imagine an alter-ego of sorts that isn't much more extroverted, but is more yourself at your best - the way you may be with your family or friends - and try and act up to it. It might help. Personally, when I do this and become more comfortable in this "role", I find that I become more relaxed and connect with the person I'm talking to a little more that I end up just being myself. - it may not work for everyone, mind you, but it's something you could try.
 
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