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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Helloo,

Are any of you out there studying or working in human resources? I'm considering finishing up my bachelor's in either english or human resources, and I'm looking for some input. Anybody have some pros and cons?

At my current job, I've observed our HR lady and her job seems like something I might be able to do as an INFP. I'm interested in the hiring and training part of the job and keeping employees safe during work. I'm not so keen on the accounting and financial part of it though.

Is it possible to be a HR manager through an english degree?

Thanks for your input!
 

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I would absolutely dread it... possibly a social worker or something, or NFP work... but a corp HR manager? Aye yi yi... Although I never worked in HR, I've worked for several companies and know plenty in HR... I knew one INFP, he didn't really fit in... and ended up leaving. The others have been a bit stuffy, probably b/c of the others they are surrounded by on a daily basis (board execs setting procedures and the other lemmings) You'll probably be doing more financial and accounting rather than hiring (which is usually left to hiring managers, hr usually sorts resumes) or training (again usually departmental) and hr might only do some kind of office dating do's and don'ts seminars or go over the companies new health plan they budgeted or 401k options. If you must do HR, I would go into HR consulting, that way you can be in and out and not really have to deal with the daily corporate environment, which I think as an INFP you will set yourself up to dread.
 

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I work as a A/R supervisor, and I have to say from what I've observed the worst part of HR is talking to the troublemakers, and firing people. Of course all this becomes easier with practice, but I really dread confronting people on my team about tardies/absences/problems that I imagine trying to fire someone while staying neutral would be really difficult. Our last HR person was completely unprofessional and got all involved in everyone's problems - one person would tell her something about someone else, and she would go directly to that person and tell them exactly what the other person said - it was a nightmare!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was thinking more along the lines of HR in Parks and Recreation, at a nature center, or possibly with the Dept. of Natural Resources. I have a background in geography/env. studies through my Associates Degree. Not sure if I want to go with HR or English for my bachelors.

I would dread having to confront employees about tardiness or dealing with unresolved employee relation issues, but maybe being a mediator wouldn't be so bad.

I would enjoy interviewing and getting to know new and long lasting employees and watching them grow within their jobs.

It just seems like a degree in HR might be safe with the way the economy is currently. I would like to study english, but I have no idea what I would do with a degree in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I work as a A/R supervisor, and I have to say from what I've observed the worst part of HR is talking to the troublemakers, and firing people. Of course all this becomes easier with practice, but I really dread confronting people on my team about tardies/absences/problems that I imagine trying to fire someone while staying neutral would be really difficult. Our last HR person was completely unprofessional and got all involved in everyone's problems - one person would tell her something about someone else, and she would go directly to that person and tell them exactly what the other person said - it was a nightmare!!
What is an A/R supervisor?
 

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Well from what I hear, HR is something that can fit the INFP abilities. I think the particular environment and company would make a big difference. If the matters concern something of interest, that would be combined with a desire to ensure people's security and harmony. Pretty good, I think! I am quite sure that I won't go into Human Resources, though. I don't want to turn into a Toby Flenderson. *shudders*
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well from what I hear, HR is something that can fit the INFP abilities. I think the particular environment and company would make a big difference. If the matters concern something of interest, that would be combined with a desire to ensure people's security and harmony. Pretty good, I think! I am quite sure that I won't go into Human Resources, though. I don't want to turn into a Toby Flenderson. *shudders*
haha Ya, I thought about him too! Na, I'm not as boring as he is! I do become extraverted towards people I know well at work.

Yes, I think where I would work would make a big difference on whether or not I could do HR at all. I DO NOT want to be part of the corporate world like I am right now in customer service. I love to help people, but I hate following all of the mundane rules and cheesy company hoorahs.

My hollands code was SAc/e/i, so that is probably where my interest in helping people comes from.

Perhaps a employee training/development specialist might be more of a job for me?
 

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What is an A/R supervisor?
Hey, I have my BA in Environmental Analysis! I was going to go into Urban Planning, but then it turned out to be too political for my tastes. My first job out of college was in Accounts Receivable, which is more like administrative accounting and has to with entering/collecting payment from the customer. I think with any job, company/employee culture can make a big difference, so it's good that you know what sector you want to work in. Also, the best HR people are the ones that actually value and treat employees like people, which fits right in with INFP's values. I'm sure your school offers internships that you can look into later on when you begin your coursework.

You can't really get away from confronting employees, but it does get easier. I find that if I am able to justify my decision by the certain actions/events that have taken place, I don't feel nearly as bad when I have to confront them. Plus there are a lot of tools available - they dedicate seminars and books to this kind of stuff, and stuff like write-ups are really procedural/textbook due to the legal implications.
 

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INFP in HR?? hell no, unless the entire HR department consists of only you (the INFP). Existing HR departments in most companies consist usually of Extroverts of the manipulative type, or so it seems anyway: their purpose is usually to advance to the top of the hierarchy, and they probably wouldn't hesitate to stomp on you to get there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As an INFP I would say that HR is the LAST place you want to be! Check out Dilbert cartoon strip as its quite accurate
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Ya, but that's a cartoon, haha. I know the mundane office scene would not be for me so I would choose to work for a county park system or something like that. Human Resources is one career on a lot of lists for INFP's, but I just don't know what that would be like. I wish they had week long courses or something like that in college where you could test out a certain job before you jump into it. Kind of like trying out a new car or something.
 

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I am an INFJ and have been in HR for 15 years. I supervise two very successful HR Managers who are INFP's and our entire HR department is made up of NF's.

From my observation of the INFP's that I've worked with HR can be very satisfying and frustrating too, and your happiness will totally depend on who you work with (not the work itself). If you work with a group of people who are very understanding and warm and fuzzy too (NF's) then you can tackle just about anything.

The stressfull parts HR for INFP's are dealing with inconsistency in other's values, having to provide service to customers that do not value integrity like you do, monotany if it exists in your role, dealing with administrative pieces of the job (reports, paperwork, etc.), and staying organized. The good parts are the ability to help others through situaitons, the opportunity to coach others and help them grown, opportunities to teach and be seen as an expert, the opportunity to right a wrong on a daily basis, every day is different (depending on your role again), and to be able to have a career that ultimately improves a group of people or an organization.

Good luck, I say go for it!
 

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I have been considering it too. I have a degree in psych. I am an INFP (mostly) and it seems HR shows up in INFP careers quite often. Which is ridiculous because it seems to involve a lot of quick judging, matter of fact thinking instead of intuitive kind, and extroverted approach. Perhaps the ones that would be a good fit are specifically hiring/development/training and that sort of thing. I have recently started to consider Industrial/Organizational psych (essentially consulting work) but unfortunately I am afraid that line of work would involve a lot of self-promotion (i.e. "selling yourself"), dealing with arrogant managers who want quick results, etc. On the plus side, I won't have to deal with the unbearable day to day organizational crap, firing, following all the crazy rules, etc.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am an INFJ and have been in HR for 15 years. I supervise two very successful HR Managers who are INFP's and our entire HR department is made up of NF's.

From my observation of the INFP's that I've worked with HR can be very satisfying and frustrating too, and your happiness will totally depend on who you work with (not the work itself). If you work with a group of people who are very understanding and warm and fuzzy too (NF's) then you can tackle just about anything.

The stressfull parts HR for INFP's are dealing with inconsistency in other's values, having to provide service to customers that do not value integrity like you do, monotany if it exists in your role, dealing with administrative pieces of the job (reports, paperwork, etc.), and staying organized. The good parts are the ability to help others through situaitons, the opportunity to coach others and help them grown, opportunities to teach and be seen as an expert, the opportunity to right a wrong on a daily basis, every day is different (depending on your role again), and to be able to have a career that ultimately improves a group of people or an organization.

Good luck, I say go for it!
Where do you work?

I can't make a decision on if I want my career to be in writing/english/nature or if I want to keep those activities seperate from work and go into HR.
Is it better to keep work and leisure seperate even if it is something that you could do every day and not get sick of it?
 

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Where do you work?

I can't make a decision on if I want my career to be in writing/english/nature or if I want to keep those activities seperate from work and go into HR.
Is it better to keep work and leisure seperate even if it is something that you could do every day and not get sick of it?
This is something I've talked about alot with my parents. I have to say I believe more often than not, having a day job is the practical thing to do. Making it as a writer is hard, and making enough to live off of is even harder. If you look at famous writers, most of them have had day jobs at one point or another. Many still do. Its hard to find writers who get famous just from writing everyday for 12 hours in their parents' basement, probably because its kind of hard, when you're living in a basement, to write stuff that a significant amount of people out there can relate to.

There is the other route, which is getting into a MFA (master of fine arts) program. Get your bachelor's, then apply to these. I know at least some have full funding, so you'll be at least going to school for free, and learning the craft of creative writing from PhDs. Its a path that I guess would allow you to balance your dream with practicality.

Being practical doesn't come natural to me either, but all I have to do is ask myself sometimes, who cares about art if you just got kicked out of your apartment cause you couldn't pay the rent, and you have to eat McDonald's everyday cuz you don't have money for anything else? I'm not saying it'll get that bad, thats a pretty bad scenario, but it seems like being out there, and working will add value to your writing anyway, because the stuff you write will be that much more connected to the experiences and emotions of your audience.
 

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I'm a first year social work student, and I already feel drained from the field! I bounce all over the place with career ideas, but I have come to think recently that Human Resources would be a good fit. A lot of people say " too much interaction and paper work", and the way I see it is that there isn't much more of a way around it unless I want to be a hermit and do some sort of computer work which I despise. I have had some bad experiences with Social Workers and Retail Managers/HR people so I'd like to get my HR degree and work for a human services agency! There are lots of jobs, especially here in Canada the market for both SW and HR is promising. Student loans suck though but hey, Insurance, Retail, & Trades is not for me! I like the idea of HR because it can be transferred into things like career counselling, training, managing, developing programs, ect, and the money isn't too bad ($50,000 avg). I bought this awesome book called " You Majored in What?!" and it really helps teach you how to market yourself no matter your degree. I am very artistic and enjoy photography, within the next couple years if I penny pinch enough I can do it on the side, its my passion so even if I am not a full-time "artist", I will get my kick because it will be a hobby and I'll do it anyways. There are options out there! I think it's important to try and move on from "limbo" and start somewhere, any work experience and training can be valuable if YOU make it valuable! Good Luck Fellow INFP's!
 
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