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I have a severe psychological aversion to it. I'm extremely quick with mental math, and love statistics, but for some reason algebra past the rudimentary, minimal requirement for college owns me. I'm not bad at geometry, and according to my ACT test results, I'm better at figuring out/guessing at trig than I am with algebra and geometry lol. I just have a very self-defeatist attitude when it comes to a lot of math I guess :confused:
 

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I'm fine at math, but it tends to piss me off at higher levels because there doesn't seem to a point to it all.
 

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Math is just an extremely exact way of objectively describing reality using a formal logical notation that does not allow for any kind of confusion when it is done correctly.

I fail to see how any rational person would call that useless.
 

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I did ok in math up to Calculus - but I never enjoyed any of it. I spent most of my time writing apps on my TI85 that would do the math for me...that was interesting.

The sciences of life were what attracted me... physics and chemistry were too mathy. I did them because I had to.
 
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If I focus I'm decent at it. Otherwise I hate it. But I would never go as far as to say its useless, thats just illogical. Math is necessary, it just frustrates me that its not something I am natural at like other subjects.
 

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Me. I failed grade 9 math twice with about 38%. Haven't taken a class in it since.

I am so bad at math that it almost constitutes a learning disability -- I can not count to 100 without complete concentration.
 
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Math is pretty counter-intuitive, and here's why.

Our natural learning comes from induction. You start with a specific experience or case, and you generalize from that, making inferences about other things based on the one thing. That's intuitive, it's how you learned to piss into a toilet, how to drink from a cup, how to sit up and crawl, etc. Pretty much, it forms the basis of how you learned almost everything you know.

Deduction, which is the essence of mathematics, is the total opposite and it requires you to develop it like a muscle. It doesn't come naturally or easily, and you have to immerse yourself in it before it grows on you.

Deduction is taking a very abstract generalization - like a language, a set of symbols, logic, or - in this case, mathematical notation - and inferring a specific case from that. You're starting from the unspecific and arriving at something specific, taking something that has no particular application or meaning, and applying it in a meaningful and particular way.

It's really important to get good at this. Being able to generalize from specific examples is natural, but being able to arrive at a specific conclusion from a set of general principles is the essence of theory and experimentation - the very foundation of science.

Once you get into theoretical science, you will be looking at a particular case study of something, attempting to derive a generalization from it - something that applies in other contexts - and then seeing if it does in fact apply to other specific cases. If it does, then we can use the generalization to deduce all kinds of other things, which leads to a deeper understanding of nature. We can actually go beyond the specific case at that point and apply the general principle that we've uncovered to all kinds of situations.
 

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I don't like math but I am pretty good at it. For as long as I can use an adding machine, I don't feel the need to learn math. Waste of time.
 
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Math is just an extremely exact way of objectively describing reality using a formal logical notation that does not allow for any kind of confusion when it is done correctly.

I fail to see how any rational person would call that useless.
It useless because most of us won't be going into the field of math. Ill be working on computer systems, not programming, for the rest of my life. I won't need trig, calc, or any of that shit. So yes to me it is worthless, to others it isn't.

@OP I was in AP or whatever you'd call it elementary school for math. We had one day where we spelled words on a calculator. I just spelled curse words and got bored and they kicked me out. Now, if I try to do it I can and I'll be good I just don't have an interest in it. I think it's too specific and that's the same reason I don't want to do programming for the rest of my life. I get A's in all my programming classes, but it doesn't mean I want to do it for the rest of my life. I'm very comfortable in a work environment after awhile and I want to manage people eventually. I'm different than you people, figured you'd understand.
 

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Matt,

I believe you have mistaken a bit. The application of math itself might not be important to your career field, it is actually doing the math problems and thinking in the abstract which will help you in other fields. That is why there are standard levels of math that most students must go through. Math as a career field is uninteresting to me, but the ways of thinking it taught me are CERTAINLY helpful in all kinds of things. I wish there were more requirements for philosophy as well, but math is seen as important to a wider variety of business/engineering/scientific applications so it is deemed more necessary. It is without a doubt more practical, even if it doesn't help you figure out life. It is a bit of rewiring of your brain, it has helped in forming patterns for literature/philosophy for me for instance.

That being said, yes, I don't necessarily ENJOY doing rote math problems, but I did them anyway. I took through Calc 3 in college and first studied CS. I quit Mu Alpha Theta in high school b/c it was just uninteresting to me.

I also understand your uninterest, I am the same way and have moved on from that. If you want to manage programmers or engineers, they will have much more respect for you if you can actually understand what they are doing. Much better than some MBA that takes over an engineering or IT department with knowledge of only business and economics.

Best
 

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I think math is beautiful, I would like to get tutoring so I can become better at it. In a classroom setting I don't do so well, however when one on one I do great.

Just about every field uses math. Like some people have to count how many pencils are needed at the DMV, or how many copies one must print. Everything involves math.
 

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/unsubscribe

Bored.
 
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