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What's your favourite lesson? Did/Do you like maths, physik or chemistry and why? Do you like English, writing stories and other artistic things? Do you agree with stereotype INTJ are good at science? Did you sometimes want to change your personality type, because you thought another personaity type is natural talented in for example learning languages?
 

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Plague Doctor
INTJ, 5w4, Ni-T type
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In High School...

My favorite subjects were science. All of them. I loved biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology, etc...

I was in advanced math. I have a neutral relationship with it. I don't hate it, but I don't love it either. I see it as a way to make science work.

I was musically talented, so I learned to play many instruments.

I enjoyed writing a lot, but I don't know how much of a strength it was.

I was extremely bad at History. Even though it's something that I enjoy studying now as a hobby, at the time in High School I didn't understand it like there was some sort of fundamental essence of History that I was blind to.

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In University, the subjects I performed best in were science, math, and neuroscience/biological psychology. The subjects I enjoyed the most were neuroscience, personality psychology, environmental psychology, statistics/research classes, tests and measures, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.

Classes I was neutral toward were abnormal psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, math, and english

Classes I didn't like were behavioral psychology

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Unusual skill I have: dream interpretation
 

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In high school I liked everything except for P.E. That class was where my classmates and I changed most teachers, because I was in the habit of giving them a hard time by fighting them over letting me get away with not participating - I refused to do most of the activities that were proposed besides the games (badminton, tennis, football), even as they promised to compromise and create conditions for me, such as allowing me to come without an equipment or getting the other students out of the room because they knew of my social anxiety - but I just hated the exercises with a passion and continued to refuse to participate in class. That was before I eventually got a fake exemption.

About the rest of my classes, I was the nerd who insisted on not skipping any of them because they were genuinely exciting for me and that's how I managed to annoy most - if not all - of my classmates, especially during my first two years of high school (it was commonly known we needed everyone to skip the class in order to make the teacher not blame only a few of us). I still think I was lucky to have excellent teachers that I had a lot to learn from, even if I didn't necessarily like all of them (though most of them I did) and I didn't want to waste my time not making the most of it. And yes, I got above average grades in everything.

I never wished to be any other type, because contrary to popular belief, even though my main interests where sciences (Computer Science, Biology and Chemistry), I didn't lack imagination and my creative projects were usually awarded and ranked first and second places by my teachers and acclaimed by my classmates. I had an exceptionally good relationship with my literature teacher because I liked her a lot and I loved reading and she made me participate in writing contests every so often, where I'd always win one of the first places as well.

It felt good to have a genuine interest in all the subjects, because my teachers could sense that and they rewarded me for it. I was the first to get picked up for anything that would win me extra credits and I was also given as an example.

Now in college I am not as enthusiastic about not skipping any class at all anymore (some of them where they theorise and theorise and theorise again are dull and they make me fall asleep), but I like it when they have a challenge for us students which can stimulate us intellectually. I am doing good in all Maths and Physics so far, as I am still top of class on my third semester. I find Electronics a bit boring but that's just because I am not necessarily interested in most hardware, although I recognise that what we study is plenty useful for anyone even outside my major. My favourite subject is programming iii (I am taking java classes this semester), although even this I like studying individually a lot more than with other people (my professors are good, but I've always liked studying languages on my own).

The most stimulating and fun class I had so far was during my last semester, it was called 'The Theory of Knowledge' and the theorising part was something like an introduction to philosophy but for practice we worked in groups and debated over diverse topics. I am not very talkative in class, but there I easily rose up to argue and the professor didn't know whether to be glad or send me home sooner than the class had to end because I would not shut my mouth for long and usually kept the class going well over the program. It's where I kind of bonded with a colleague I believe to be an estp - not over shared opinions, but our need to argue.
 

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I believe my response can be divided into two aspects of high school: Middle and "High".

In Middle School, among my most interesting subjects were history (me and the teacher still contact each other to this day), science (the generalized) version and surprisingly languages (more specifically Japanese). I was also in the debating club, and the chess team (the middle school champion).

In High School, the above rapidly changed to chemistry, earth systems (my favorite subject), mathematics and subjects of a mystical or abstract nature. I thoroughly enjoyed Mathematics C (matrices, vectors, Fibonacci sequence, geometric sequences + more), as what mathematics is in the end of finding patterns to logical sequences. It was during those times I was coming up with theories on how the world works. I did find the languages easy to grasp, as I am tri-lingual, but they did not challenge me as the above subjects did. Reflecting upon this, while I enjoyed the company of teachers (I was most certainly a teacher's pet), it was during this time I realized how different I really was.
 

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I hated math and science as a kid. Although I'd describe myself as being very rational, what ends up truly making sense to me doesn't always need a long and drawn out proof. In the real world, when I sense that I DO need a more ornate analysis of something, I'd rather find someone else who can do that legwork than do it myself. My personal skill isn't in massaging through intricate logical details, it's getting to a desired end result in spite of them.

Part of my problem with math and science is being a kinesthetic learner. I need to do things to learn them. When I took math and science classes, the subject matter always focused on how well you understood the particulars of how to solve problems while completely blowing off what you actually use the material to do or accomplish. To study for a math test, I'd do practice problems and try to understand the skill needed to get the right answer, then take the exam and get ticked off when I'd get my test back and learn that I got docked points for problems that required you to catch some stupid trick to avoid going down the wrong path and screwing up your answer.

The classes I did like as a kid included the languages (I learned to read/write Latin, read/speak/write Spanish, French, Japanese), and Literature. I always read books well ahead of my age as a kid. I also pick up languages extremely quickly, and later found out that this applies to programming languages as well. In college, I went through the Business school, and enjoyed my classes in Finance and Management (but hated Accounting). I also continued the Literature path and double-majored in English, just because I've always really enjoyed articulating my opinions here and there.
 

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I also pick up languages extremely quickly, and later found out that this applies to programming languages as well.
You would not believe how accurate your statement applies to myself as well. It was almost like a language that you knew and could understand, but could never speak it. (Apologies, but the above resonated with me so much, it had to be said).
 
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The only thing [about school] I did not fancy were the people -- my desire was to learn without any people present. I loved school. Every subject; even if I were not innately skilled at it. Even something as repulsive of ph-ED, the best part about of ph-ED class were the written portion(s). I was rather excited when ph-ED class made us take [written] exams & taught us muscle & other anatomic-groups; rather than fitness activities.

I was never bored. Never full - always famished/starved for more information (&) knowledge. The most exciting thing was getting a freshly-purchased textbook; I would spend hour(s) just reading (X)-textbook outside of what was assigned, sometimes during the class itself. I loved indexes, the credits, the glossaries of textbooks; I would memorize all the definitions / scientific-terms / vocabulary - [and document them]. I loved to research; the big projects excited me. I simply loved the free expression assignment(s) pertaining to particular subjects, that made way for my intellectual creativity without constraints, the more scientific and/or linguistic, the better.

I went to some extent(s); I stole from the library on a few occassions, as at one point; I felt so information-starved, as I were [going into a saddness].

I still am thirsty for high-functioning knowledge / learning. A brink of my [first/second] semester in college was utterly useless; as I spent a great deal of time taking irrelevant/uneeded classes.
 

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High School
History, Chemistry, English/Creative Writing, Orchestra, French

College
Ancient History, Chem. Lab, World Literature, Languages

There were a lot of electives that were my real favorites: archery, dance appreciation, history of science, religion, etc. Maybe that's because I took the tough, required courses during my first two years and took easier classes in the last two years.

I was good at math, but didn't really care for it. Art was a pleasurable subject, but I didn't care for the classes. I miss being a student in a structure environment, truly. Right now, I still take classes but find it hard to get in and stay within the spirit of being a pupil.
 

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I live in a french speaking area and English was the 2nd language we learned in school and since I learned english very early in life I loved this class because it felt rewarding to be above everyone else in a subject for once.

I wasn't great in math because I had terribly bad teachers. When you have an entire class of people who are one year behind everyone else in math, you know something is wrong with the teacher. Worst of all, that teacher was the one teaching the people retaking math all over again... Ridiculous...

Again, first language is french so I had french class. I liked writing stories and coming up with characters and settings. I was always limited by the amount or words I was allowed to write and I always found that to be annoying because I wanted to expand on everything a little more. My biggest drawback was my grammar and orthography. We would always start with 20 points for each and I'd lose pretty much all of them from the start. French grammar is a nightmare and I understand why some people have trouble just learning the language, writing it without mistakes is a god like skill really. Text composition aside the whole class was extremely boring and the books they forced us to read were barf inducing X_X

A lot of things I didn't like in school I now love, reading is a good example of that. IMO school is better at killing a kid's motivation rather than bringing them anything useful. I need hands on experience on stuff I like to feel the need to learn about it, throwing random pieces of information at me is hardly going to make me want to learn more about it.
 

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I'm still in High School (albeit a special school for super nerds):
Biology, Chemistry, English, Philosophy, Art -- enjoyable + easy (I'm naturally good at these subjects)
Foreign Languages -- enjoyable + hard (I'm not a natural with languages and I took the hardest ones)
Math + Physics -- interesting + good at them with consistent work (I'm not a natural with advanced math)
History -- less interesting + okay at it (I do the minimum to get the grade I want)
Avoiding: Computer Science (too hard), Economics & Psychology (too easy -- both are hobbies of mine), Music (not naturally inclined).
Athletics is a breeze.

My favorite subjects are English & advanced classes relating to Human Biology. I'm enjoying my (easy) Philosophy class this year too. I get good grades in all my classes but only bc I want to have the option of getting into the college of my choice. School feels like a chore. I prefer working and learning things outside of school.
 

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What's your favourite lesson? Did/Do you like maths, physik or chemistry and why? Do you like English, writing stories and other artistic things? Do you agree with stereotype INTJ are good at science? Did you sometimes want to change your personality type, because you thought another personaity type is natural talented in for example learning languages?
I never had physics to speak of, but I was in a fundie school that pretended to refute evolution on the basis of the hopeful monster theory and put Bible verses on science tests. I only had chemistry in community college, which was shallow and geared toward the tests, not understanding or even realism. Reading ahead in the second half of the textbook outright contradicted the first half, though we never got to organic chem or the more advanced stuff. Technically, I did have a physics class in community college, but it was simple, stupid, and the teacher outright fucked up the projects then graded however he felt like anyway. It wasn't physics. It just used some of the terminology in pretense of being physics.

English was my best subject in the fundie school because it was the most logical, with a focus sentence diagrams and word functions, and the fact that it was taught by a specific teacher, who only taught that and music for everyone past kindergarten level. I was usually considered the best in science, as my second best subject, up till they get real fucking preachy and went utterly apeshit when seriously questioned, much less with any intellectual depth. They considered that both disrespectful and sinful.

Math was weird. Since we didn't really have physics, we rarely had any practical application, even in theory. In fundie school, the teachers tended to understand less than I, which given the above fundie mentality tended to go badly. Eventually it got funny since another of the tall/smart trio and I were specifically asked to figure out and explain to the teachers how division of fractions worked because none of the teachers could understand. Compare this to that English teacher, who, despite understanding her subjects quite well, openly had me called out of class to check her work on the weirdest diagram attempt she'd ever seen. She didn't find it at all disrespectful. She literally knew better than that.

Math in community college and university was mostly gobbledygook with no remotely practical usage or even a hint of future relevance. Trig even falls short and putters out, practically speaking, once you hit calculus, raising the question of what the fucking point was of tons of meaningless memorization only to memorize something completely different later for any practical purpose. I get the logic of various maths, but emotionally and subconsciously, I understand that there are orders of infinity of coherent potential mathematical constructs. Most are meaningless. I don't find them amusing, and I can't bloody remember them arbitrarily without practical reason. Slapping meaningless labels on them doesn't help at all. THEN there's how many upper level math teachers suck at teaching but consider that the students' problem. Failing to explaining ALL necessary steps/terms/parts and failing to allow for a logical progression in presenting and assembling of those parts, BOTH were NORMAL. That's stupid, unprofessional, and should be affecting employment, but NO... "OUR" (the customers) problem.

Now... Creative writing. In fundie school, they told us what we have to write about and graded us down if they didn't like our style or subject matter. If our characters and plots (or lack thereof) didn't fit an especially constrained tardassed version of the fundie bullshit, we could be punished. The girls fared far better than the boys, unsurprisingly... Silly non-mindless-rule-followers. No wonder they treated us like proto-monsters that needed taming. We couldn't even NOT think, while continuing to talk/write, on cue.:rolleyes:

Writing in community college was arbitrary and had disturbingly similar but more random constraints as fundie school. The main teacher I had to contend with for the basic general-ed class even kicked me out of her class, prior to the first assignment actually being due, for continuing to ask questions. I even had a cousin in that very class who admitted she didn't understand what nonsense the teacher was spouting, in that or any latter assignment, but still managed to pass somehow by staying quiet and playing along. Considering what the teacher said after kicking me, she didn't like the look of me anyway. I had to withdraw from her class, even in larger classrooms, at least 3 more times, IIRC. I finally ended up with some guy "from the 60s" who actually gave me one of his rare As for actually writing stuff he didn't consider utterly vapid. That was boring still but funny considering everything else I'd encountered with the other teacher and her preferred students. I HATED when I was supposed to critique someone prattling on about their disturbingly generic friends doing pointlessly dumb things, just because those things apparently were the trends and who does anything but follow trends, right?:dry:

I had a hell of a time in my technical writing class too since it was literally all about HR/PR/PC bullshit as "professionalism", NOT ANY actual TECHNICAL anything, much less technical competence, even in terms of actual communication. I had another tech-writing class specifically to be "in major", but that turned out to be a morality class (not META-ethics either) with both blatant political bias and the teacher's own EXPLICIT Christian/theist bias. That did not go well. Aside from clashing with the teacher, having to write about my values in regards to people/family/life offended and disturbed every classmate that had to read mine, though the other atheist (culturally Christian as hell) was perversely amused. Theirs bored and annoyed me. I couldn't relate to what they considered normal, having never experienced anything specific that any of them considered normal, and certainly didn't go about assuming what tiny minded nonsense they seemed to glean from that experience. It was obvious a couple were smarter, but they were all steeped in what kind of bullshit they were supposed to play along with. That was even more disturbing. Idiots are irritating. Useful idiots in preprogrammed lockstep are mortal enemies.

I never exactly wrote stories, though I daydreamed constantly and had hyper-realistic, complex, continuing/repeating dreams as a kid. As far as explaining any period of my life, I don't tell actual stories. I have, long ago, extrapolated a few scenarios, which repeatedly got me told to write scifi/fantasy books, but that was a long time ago, and the culture has only turned shittier since. I've had enough fiction and have no use for fans anyway. Funny, when I first came online, everyone kept thinking I was female within minutes of speaking. Kinda ironic that IRL people thought I was autistic. I scored "hyper-feminine" on my IQ test too. I think I would've been good with foreign language since I was always good at decoding strange people's odd manners of speaking, but I'm barely ever social, and I'm too old now.
 

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As an undergraduate, I was only interested in comparative literature -- French, German literature, phenomenology from the post-Husserlians, and literary criticism. I did two creative writing poetry classes, and I was pretty committed to my little art; I had to sneak into the music practice rooms to jam on the piano, but I was really just into blues and jazz, and had the good fortune to learn some of the "inside baseball" of professional jazz and blues playing from a private teacher up in Harlem, and occasionally steal some time to go play some open jams, pint of whiskey in my jacket, and getting my ass kicked every time, musically. It's a way to learn!

As a graduate student, still, literature (several distinct specialized areas, with some fairly detailed work in some secondary areas), I eventually crossed over into the enemy territory by doing my theoretical component coursework in the philosophy grad school, instead of toeing the CompLit line of "history of [German-idealist-influenced-continental] philosophy," into realist phenomenology and the contemporaneous origins of analytic philosophy (primarily early Husserl, Ingarden, and the standard work in Wittgenstein, Russell, Frege), and from there the standard work in logic, set theory, metamathematics, and the then-emergent in maturity field of formal [biomedical is the classic application] ontologies. Teaching fellowship awarded at the University of Paris my second year, where I picked up the basics of phonology, in addition to reading Leibniz at the National Library, for a year and a half, followed by two horrible terms teaching French language classes to UGs back in the US (teaching English Comp was much more rewarding!)

After, some additional engineering training in electrical engineering (basic digital design, basic analog circuits), physics+calculus sequence, linear algebra, two terms of chemistry, two terms of discrete mathematics, numerical analysis, data structures in CS, algorithm complexity, automata theory, systems-level coursework in C/ASM, some useless C++ grunt coursework. Modal logic, machine learning, general "artificial intelligence" coursework.

I burned out of that feeling my time would be better spent learning real C++, with freedom to explore the language in depth, continuing my work in knowledge representation, deeper work in modal and description logics, and worked the syllabus to Compiler Construction, and Differential Equations (fun, like little puzzles), with free time to work on abstract algebra, a tiny bit of category theory, grabbed a CCNA cert (not actually that easy), learned Python and some libraries for data preprocessing and general sysadmin gruntwork, and studying as much as I can of SDN and how to contribute to/manipulate some APIs for the OWL web ontology. If I ever get around to it, contributing to some technical documentation for things like Lilypond, OpenLogic, dLib, or some other interesting github-ish projects would be good, since I enjoy that kind of work as well -- I've been warned by a friend that technical writing is boring, but, fortunately, I'm a pretty boring guy, so that suits me fine.


Now, I'm putting together a little portfolio of some nice clean sample code, well-commented, industry-standard formatting and practices , and that's it for my formal education. I'm not a genius savant coder, but I'm competent enough (well, I know C++ pretty well, with the STL and a small amount of boost, and I've rounded out my straight C with useful stuff like sockets.h, and am always puzzling out little things with working with the assembler in the linux gcc, and, of course, the bog-standard fake "languages" Matlab and Verilog, way back in the stack, plus Python for doing quick stuff [not my favorite, but it works] -- Java is a weak spot, but I can follow it and, if pressed, I can deal with it if I have to, and my knowledge of web design and databases is pretty weak as hell, but I have to prioritize), and I think I'm going to be OK. At the very least I can wear a toolbelt and fix UTP cables as well as the next guy -- hell, Spinoza ground lenses for his living back in the day, and he was an intellectual beast, whereas I'm just some guy. I'm not picky, just ready to move on to the next chapter.

Oh yes, and editor? That's Vim, all the way. Although I've been liking emacs+an extension called eVil (not sure if the caps are right), which gives you the key bindings for vim within emacs. Not a vim power-guru-master-expert, but I like it, and maybe using emacs+evil will let me spend the few extra minutes to get better at LISP. I have to face facts, I'm never going to become a great Haskell or APL or LISP l33t programmer, but I can keep my hand in, plus emacs has better tetris.
 

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When I was in elementary school, my mom gave me a 1970s-issue Old Dominion marine biology textbook. It quickly became my fave and I would even read it at recess (would have been probably 2nd grade in the late '80s). Also, I should probably mention that I was originally left-handed, but was "reprogrammed" by "the system" to write with my right hand. This was common practice in the '80s, not for superstitious reasons, but for the sake of expediency. In previous generations, they did the same thing, but for superstitious reasons and expediency. In more recent times, it's been proven that "reprogramming" people in this way can cause or exacerbate learning deficiencies. On a related note, people didn't even understand dyslexia in the mid 20th century.

But I digress. Time for an anecdote. One day, I was reading my marine biology book at recess (the sign of a genuine-article ubernerd) and a teacher saw me and took it away, then she made me play basketball with some other kids. This is northeast Indiana, so basketball is part of the culture here. Of course, they resented my presence because I was an "interloper" and was no good at sports. I didn't understand it back then, but looking back on it now, I know that the teacher was trying to "socialize" me. Her attempt failed. Recognizing individual aptitude never was a high priority for "the system" and its sycophantish acolytes.

So, yeah. I was a genuine-article '80s nerd in the '80s, but was nothing like Steve Urkel, had a McGyver mullet, and wore stone-washed jeans all the time (not acid-washed, stone-washed). Middle school in the early '90s was different. It was like being sent to prison for a crime you didn't commit and forced to co-exist with people who actually did have a criminal mentality. And they were all bigger than me. Even the ones who were the same age. Even the girls.
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I'd better get off that topic before I start having flashbacks ('Flashback' was my favorite game back in 1993, btw). Repressed memories, hooo! (Yeah, that was another video game reference. Escapism, hooo!) So anyway, math continued to be a severe weakness for me in middle school. I did well in English, literature, and social studies. Art, surprisingly, was something I was only average at (grade-wise), probably because I didn't want to do what I was told. I've always been notorious for creating art that most would perceive as "transgressive," typically delving into the realm of body horror. Naturally, it's no wonder I totally dig Cronenberg movies. Oh yeah, and the early '90s were around the time I first started getting into anime ('Vampire Hunter D' was my first experience with it). Not surprisingly, the stuff I liked best almost always pertained to body horror and/or ultraviolence.

And then there was Phys. Ed. which was a mixed bag for me. On the one hand, I wasn't good at organized team sports because they were based on rules that I didn't invent, myself, and because they were team-based and I was an extreme individualist. On the other hand, this was around the time I'd gotten into Taekwondo (starting in 1990 when I was 10), so I was good at and even enjoyed kinesthetic activities that trained heuristic proprioception (the principle that makes muscle memory possible). One day, we had genuine-article Marines come in and conduct real military exercises and I was actually good at them and they were fun. People were surprised by how high I could jump despite how short I was. I think there was only maybe one person out of dozens who was shorter than me, but I was still thought of as not only a runt, but the runt. Not by these Marines, though. They didn't care about that.

So middle school mostly sucked, but there were some good times in there too. Then high school rolled around and I don't remember my Freshman year being a nightmare like it is for some. I think it was my Sophomore year (circa 1995-ish) when I first became obsessed with mutant pigs. My biology teacher had a collection of various animals, some of them mutated, pickled in jars of formaldehyde. One of them was a mutated mutant cyclops pig with cyclopia. Naturally, it quickly became my fave of her collection. Also, biology was my fave of the sciences. Technology is fun, but nature is even more fascinating for me. Anyway, I treated that cyclops pig like a mascot and even drew caricatures of it like it was a comic book character or something!
:tongue:
Gonzo absurdist humor has always seen me through the tough times of adolescence and has continued to serve me effectively all throughout adulthood. So what else about high school in the '90s? Well, I had friends of pretty much all social cliques, so you could say I was a "wildcard" of sorts. Nowadays, we'd call that "Divergent." Nerds, jocks, I didn't judge like that, so I had friends from just about every "faction," even the ones that might have been called "preps" (just not the elitist ones) due to their family ties or whatnot. At that time, I was considered a "freak" rather than a "geek." Batman would have described me as "highly intelligent but emotionally unstable" with aptitudes in "applied science, biology, and art." As in middle school, I had a hard time forcing myself to follow directions in art class because I wanted to go crazy.

Let's rewind back to middle school for a moment since I forgot to mention something and I don't feel like restructuring this essay. They put me on Ritalin in 7th grade (if I recall) due to my declining math grades. I only had to take the smallest dose and there were plenty of us who were prescribed that MK Ultra wannabe drug back then. It actually helped my math grades which is indicative that it must have actually improved my concentration, but I don't recall feeling any different. Not like Bart when he was diagnosed with "Classclownism" and had to take Focusin.



So jumping forward again (sheesh, I'm getting all Tarantino with this timeline), high school was alright. I'd been bullied all throughout elementary and middle school and people in authority didn't seem to care, so I guess I became somewhat aggressive as a high school teen. More what I'd describe as "aggressively defensive" (not to be confused with "passive-aggressive"). The martial arts training helped me focus it, though. Somewhat, that is. Anyway, college in the late '90s was good times. I went to a trade school majoring in graphic design, which involves typography, and minoring in business management, which involves psychology. I have a knack for typography, but graphic design is long since obsolete, and I've never had a job in that field despite my college having a so-called "placement department." That college went out of business anyway because they failed to place at least 80% of graduates in field-related jobs.

Since 1997, I've worked in one restaurant, two department stores (at one point, I was a Housewares clerk just like Ash from 'Army of Darkness'), two offices, and lots of different factories (or book binderies, orthopedics plants, etc.). Guess you could say I'm a Jack of all trades, master of none. I haven't retained anything I've learned in school except for the basics. Most of what I know about history is stuff that I've learned from reading for sheer pleasure and for the quest for knowledge and wisdom. I call it "The Sage's Quest."
 

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Addendum: I should have specified that the Marines came to our middle school Phys. Ed. class, not the Taekwondo dochang.
 

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Well, if we're going there... Forgot to mention art, I guess, which is a joke to even think about. It was A book, basically. The same one for years and was only for the rare moments we'd completed other assignments. A few odd ball teachers did Sunday school type shit with construction paper occasionally. I was in the same school from kindergarten, mostly the same half dozen kids including the next grade's and eventually the half dozen in the grade behind. My fundie school dropped grade levels at 9th, IIRC, and I dropped out the next year since they wouldn't let me advance at all. We never had separate "high school" levels. We never had high school like classes. There was no diversity in basic subjects. There was sitting around individually between a couple white dividers filling out little magazines with cartoons of pupil-less, constantly-smiling, Stepford-creepy kids, like something out of the 50s meant for indoctrinating kindergartners. The supervisor (explicitly not teachers anymore) just checked out work after we finished a given magazine, though she stopped doing that for me and starting giving me demerits for not doing work I couldn't do. The look on her face after I started forging her signature and retrieving a few new magazines... She knew what she was doing.

I was THE big-fish, the creepy quiet "psychic" freak that talked funny and verbally hurt people's heads when disturbed, and ironically the anti-bully, which mostly involved getting in trouble for contending with Tiny Tim the "princiPal" as he roved about starting shit. Of course, the other tall/smart but much skinnier of the trio also got in trouble, even the submissive rule-follower. Towering over Tiny Tim, physically or mentally, didn't pay. I wasn't allowed to skip grades, even the one, which was perpetually the only higher one and was in the same damn room. They claim it was for social development, which couldn't fucking happen when we marched everywhere in quiet lines, girls always first, when we even left the room in which we couldn't speak unless directed. I was volunteered for spelling bees and shit meant to show up in the newspaper and make the school look good. What set that off was that, according to the CAT tests, I could've skipped from 6th grade to 12th... At home, I wasn't allowed to go anywhere or do anything either, just grunt work that gave me teenage arthritis. I read dictionaries, a couple encyclopedias, old medical books, and theology texts. My life was/is a wash. Now, they blame me for not going anywhere they proudly stopped me from going permanently. I've very tired and not really interested in anything but outright magic or super/mad-science, which don't exist. Nothing else can give me anything I actually want.:crazy:

Knowing things basically just pisses me off, either the content itself or its utter worthlessness, but that's reality. The supposed fruits of education rot on the vine or in my rotting guts.
 

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INTJ
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I fucking hated school. I still hate school, even 2 1/2 years after I graduated college. I still have nightmares of being back. I love learning, but only about topics I'm interested in, and there's very little I'm interested in that's taught in an academic setting. Although I did always find psychology fascinating (imagine that) which is why I minored in it.
 

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I enjoyed and excelled at everything except PE. I was particularly fond of history, maths, literature and languages, not least because I was lucky to have wonderful teachers in those subjects - some went out of their way to bring me extra books to read.
 

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primary school- i remember it being me and this girl were at the top of our year, we would get stuff like those mensa patterns and heaps of extra homework. my reading and comprehension was much higher than my peers i became school captain (thinking back it doesnt mean much lol but i was the only male who applied we had to do CVs and interviews and stuff...), was bullied too (who wasnt?)

favourite lessons...hmm id say english

High School- moved to the other end of the country, i stopped trying at this point. all my subject were bludge subjects my favourite subject would have to be woodworks and the recreational studies (i know right? studied how to camp and golf and stuff) in senior.
looking back i also liked Study of Religion, it was a more in depth study of different religions and we got a free period as well so haha i signed up but i learnt so much from it.

edit: didnt go to university, grabbed a traineeship instead
 

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Delphic Seer
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I’ve always excelled in school –since kindergarten to graduate school– so I’ve always liked it (what’s not to like about one’s own comparative advantages? Haha). In elementary school, I liked foreign languages (I’ve been multilingual since like forever), history and geography. In high school, I was into geology and social sciences. In college, I was fascinated by philosophy, research methodology, political science, economics and mysticism. Nowadays, I’m a part-time college professor and occasional lecturer.

On the other hand, I must admit I’m no artist so I’ve always sucked at artistic activities (music, dancing, poetry, theatre and the like), but my creativity is mostly theoretical, analytical and/or strategic.

Concerning sports, I used to play tennis and practice karate when I was in college. Before that, I had never been interested in sports in any way, shape or form.

The only thing I dislike(d) about school is having to interact with other people.
 
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