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Hello everyone. I am here today because I am a 27 year old INTJ who currently works as a youth worker. I've known I was an INTJ for awhile now and have had no complaints with it, but I have always found it strange that I ended up in this kind of work instead of the ones that are more stereotypical. That said my dream job has and still is to be a lawyer (just not sure if I can afford law school), but more on my current job I try to focus on planning and organizing the activities and programs at my desk and getting everything ready. I try to do this as much as possible because it is what I enjoy most, but my job always requires me to be on the front line with youth (or people in general) in order to help them with their problems or help them reach certain goals and ect, which some days I can do no problem and then other days it is very draining for me, even if nothing "bad" happens with the interactions that day.

My original reason for getting in this work is because I love psychology and learning how and why people act the way they do. I find it super interesting. But unless you have a masters or another graduate degree (which I don't) front-line helping work is kinda where you end up working usually.

With all of this said, I also do like helping people, but I like in the more "practical way" such as helping someone make a resume, or entrusting them with a task so that they can learn hard/soft skills and gain confidence. My weakness comes with the showing emotion or empathy. This can be hard for me even though it has improved over the years because I am not on average an extremely emotional person, even when I myself am feeling emotional.

Anyway the point of this rant is, are there other INTJ's in the helping field? If so how did you end up in that position? Is it challenging for you? Do you like it? Why or why not? If you didn't like it did you eventually change careers
 

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I am in a helping profession and I will answer your question when I have some energy lol maybe tomorrow.

I also got into mine by way of psychology but I did get my master’s in a specific profession.
 

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I'm not in a helping profession, but I did do a lot of volunteer work throughout my high school years working as an elementary school teacher/teacher's assistant. I loved it for a lot of the same reasons you mentioned above–helping kids in a practical way, discovering how each child learns and teaching them according to how they learn, etc.

My weakness comes with the showing emotion or empathy. This can be hard for me even though it has improved over the years because I am not on average an extremely emotional person, even when I myself am feeling emotional.
I can relate to this. This is where I struggle relating with others, esp. working with kids. Although I'm not emotional, I do have a nurturing/protective side to my personality, so I try to channel that when it's needed.

Not sure if I'll end up in a career in that field, but I did enjoy my time doing it.
 

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hello, I am not in a helping profession per se, but after having worked in banking for several years I now just volunteer in community settings and I mostly tutor children. Especially those children who have difficulties in school due to coming from poor and otherwise deprived backgrounds. So I have kind of come the other way. I first passed form a business career and later ended up in this childrens' tutor role, where I particularly enjoy connecting with children and making them feel confident in themselves and in their intellects, through grasping and mastering mathematical and language concepts and techniques that previously seemed out of their reach. I draw particular satisfaction from seeing them rise from so-called low ability sets in their class, to high ability sets. Many of these children are at risk of falling out of the school system and into the streets , if their belief in their academic /intellectual abilities is compromised due to lack of support like the one I provide. And, where I live, very bad things happen to children who drop out of school. I am thankful for the opportunity life has given me to transition from what I saw as a vacuous profession with a lot of money, to an activity with little money but plenty of meaning and meaningful human connections with tomorrow's hope: our children

I wish you the best, superhuman! You will probably end up doing a lot of very different things in your life. But whatever you do, I am sure you will look back with gratitude to the experiences that your current profession granted you
 

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Anyway the point of this rant is, are there other INTJ's in the helping field? If so how did you end up in that position? Is it challenging for you? Do you like it? Why or why not? If you didn't like it did you eventually change careers
I am in an allied health profession (think: physical therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy). I got there through psychology. I was interested in people's brains, how they work, what happens when they don't work and how to rehabilitate. I got my BA in psychology and then went on to get my MS in my field.

Is it challenging? hmm yes. I like to do the part where I assess the person, figure out what's going on, what are the deficits, what do we need to do to help, make a plan, etc. I also do enjoy when I see improvements and success, goals achieved.

I don't really like the day-to-day treatment part. It is draining. It is hardest on days where I am tired from the work week or life and I have to be "on" and interact all day. I work with kids so it's even more energy. If I had a more paperwork oriented type of job, I can get through that when I'm drained a little easier.

So, I am hoping eventually to go into consultation/advising type of position and teaching. I have actually also heard tale of some positions where all I would do is assessment and developing the treatment plan and then others would do the therapy work based off of that, which would be perfect for me. I’d be totally fine with a position like that. Right now my job is doable and I get great benefits and time off so it is working ok but over time it is going to be too much, I can tell.

Overall, I interact with people fine. I don't have a ton of extroverted emoting but I can understand people and empathize and I think people get that and appreciate it. I did an internship in my field in mental health and a lot of my classmates said they wouldn't be able to do that because they would be too emotional. So, in that case, I think my ability to separate a bit of emotion from helping was actually a strength. I could hear people's difficult stories in mental health, they could be completely open with me and not have me freak out or cry. I heard some really tough things but I was able to be there for them and keep it all together. Same now when I work with parents who have difficult children, they are worn out, they are confused, some are upset, I can stay calm and collected - I can hear their concerns and address them calmly. It gives them a sense that someone is there that can help. So, there's times where you can be in a helping profession but kind of be a pillar of strength in a sense. There's ways to work it out.
 

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Hey everyone. Thanks a lot for replying to me. It helps to know that there are other INTJ's going through similar stuff, cause it's hard enough to meet another INTJ as it is, little lone one doing this kind of work. lol

I can relate to this. This is where I struggle relating with others, esp. working with kids. Although I'm not emotional, I do have a nurturing/protective side to my personality, so I try to channel that when it's needed.
Yes I agree with this for myself too, it's one of the reasons I got into this work. But sometimes you can tell they just want someone to 'emote' with them, and at moments like that I struggle.

I wish you the best, superhuman! You will probably end up doing a lot of very different things in your life. But whatever you do, I am sure you will look back with gratitude to the experiences that your current profession granted you
Thanks! You're right though, who knows where I will end up going in the end (but we'll always try to plan ahead for it am I right? :p ). It is just a matter of finding that perfect job where I can do what I do best; plan and organize things alone!

I am in an allied health profession (think: physical therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy). I got there through psychology. I was interested in people's brains, how they work, what happens when they don't work and how to rehabilitate. I got my BA in psychology and then went on to get my MS in my field.
That all sounds amazing. One of the things I have considered is going back to school so that I can move up and do a job that is similar to yours. Because like I said originally I love studying psychology, and being able to do more research based jobs is very appealing to me.
 

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I volunteered for many years tutoring children, some with special needs, such as Autism. I also enjoyed learning what teaching method worked, with a certain child. Seeing their progress was rewarding, the only problem I experienced was with the parents. I'd help a child take a step forward, & the parents would take them two steps back. I couldn't figure out why they would sabotage all their hard work, by not following through, neglecting, or all together stopping the program that's helping their child. :frustrating: Dealing with emotions was not my strong suit, but I tried to be comforting with my words, & reassuring. I had one little girl who was being bullied, so we practiced what to do the next time it happened. I had her act out what she would do, & say. It helped build her confidence.

I also enjoy psychology, it helps me to understand people better. It was draining being around people, but I would recuperate when I got home. I'd decompress in different ways. Anything from a hot bath, journaling, or even going for a drive to meditate, while listening to music helped too.
 

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Anyway the point of this rant is, are there other INTJ's in the helping field? If so how did you end up in that position? Is it challenging for you? Do you like it? Why or why not? If you didn't like it did you eventually change careers
okay, so first off i'm not in a helping field. answering anyway because it has been a sort of consistent sub-theme throughout my life, and i've had plenty of thoughts about it from non-professional exposure to that kind of work.

- If so how did you end up in that position?

as said, i never did anything so intentional as 'i'm going to do this for a living so let me go get myself qualified'. my answer for the informal involvement i have had is that i just sort of drifted sideways into it. it's mostly evolved out of whatever i was already doing in my existing life.

- Is it challenging for you?

when you're not professionally committed to it, the bar is lower and you can pick and choose a bit more. plus, you can just drift back out as soon as you meet a challenge. with that said, the challenges i saw (and which made me decide that this isn't for me) could all be summed up by: i don't know how to take human dynamics and priorities, and stuff them into a kpi kind of metrics framework. so i think if i did take on that kind of work, the problem of how to even define my accountability would do me in. much less the problem of how to meet the definition that i haven't been able to stabilize in my own mind. tl;dr: "boundaries".

- Do you like it?

i like fixing things. and i seriously like the thing of 'knowing' on a low-key but continual basis that i'm bringing something constructive. there is something complex going on with my fi value-set in the back end as well, which i find hard to summarize clearly. it sort of comes down to feeling proud of the fact that what i'm good at is helping other people while not interfering with them. or with the autonomy/privacy that i consider to be of paramount importance #because fi.

or why not?

i'm inherently queasy with the idea itself that i'm getting any of my own [whatever] from thinking about my effect or influence on someone else. so a profession made out of doing that would disturb me ovr the permanent term. i like to hit and run to avoid that entire problem.

less metaphysically, i just get exhausted and end up feeling sort of hollowed out by relentless focus on other people. and also, i get drained by the perpetual moral/ethical math that never stops going on in my own head, trying to compute and build my guidelines on the fly. tldr again: aside from introvert drain, i just dislike the entire question of responsibility, whether it's on the 'good' side of getting a glow, or the 'bad' side of making endless judgment calls that have a human impact.

did you eventually change careers
i didn't change careers since i never had one in that area. but i decided not to have one for the various reasons described. i feel more comfortable in a field where i can just let my analytical brain off the hook and not worry about the collateral implications.
 

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Anyway the point of this rant is, are there other INTJ's in the helping field? If so how did you end up in that position? Is it challenging for you? Do you like it? Why or why not? If you didn't like it did you eventually change careers
I am in the helping field through psychology.
I ended up in the position because I wanted to be in it.
It's somewhat challenging for me.
I love it because it's rewarding and I can do it by myself. I only recently hired an assistant because I went more independent than I was already (independent from certain automated services plus my assistant is my best friend and lives halfway across the world right now, so he doesn't irritate me).
I can't imagine every getting into a position I didn't like, but I suppose if I was going through some hard times, I'd have to take whatever job I could get. Basically, I can't really imagine a reality where I didn't like it. But if I didn't like any job I was in I'd change fields.

Hope this helps!
 

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I'm not in a helping field. Actually, quite the opposite. I work somewhere in beauty/fashion where competition is everything. I've always enjoyed being of use to people... which is more task oriented, but working in this field has pushed me further into wanting to help them too. So there is someone struggling because of the environment, I'll give them counsel (if they ask) and do some kind of service that helps to maneuver them in the right direction.

The thing I dislike most about this is being sucked into drama or becoming someone's crutch, so I do keep a distance and discriminate quite a bit, avoiding the overtaxed feeling.

I did work as an assistant teacher years ago, though. I was so impatient and didn't (still don't) believe in coddling people - even children - back then. The only thing that has changed now is my perspective. Less impatience and a little more understanding.

^That wasn't a career choice, by the way, just a long-running summer gig. Although at some point I did want to study psychology in order to become a therapist for criminally-minded children. I nixed that idea once I realize that I don't like kids that much and I don't have the emotional fortitude I thought was needed to handle a job like that.

Oh and I know that this type of job is draining for even the most demonstrative of emoters, so don't feel disappointed with yourself on that.
 

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You should be very succesful in that field.

Why? Because your deep analytical skills can easily identify flairs and talents, then you have vivid projections on how those could be useful in the future, so you will always be able to give the most sound advices on any of those youth can ever receive.

The challenge will only be in the method of delivering those advices in efficient and effective manners for people are so varied. Knowing mbti will help you though since you already know in what areas you are lacking and you consciously exerting effort to improve them.

You'll eventually grow into enfp-ish intj, i can foresee.


Sent sans PC
 

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I volunteered for many years tutoring children, some with special needs, such as Autism. I also enjoyed learning what teaching method worked, with a certain child. Seeing their progress was rewarding, the only problem I experienced was with the parents. I'd help a child take a step forward, & the parents would take them two steps back. I couldn't figure out why they would sabotage all their hard work, by not following through, neglecting, or all together stopping the program that's helping their child. :frustrating: Dealing with emotions was not my strong suit, but I tried to be comforting with my words, & reassuring. I had one little girl who was being bullied, so we practiced what to do the next time it happened. I had her act out what she would do, & say. It helped build her confidence.

I also enjoy psychology, it helps me to understand people better. It was draining being around people, but I would recuperate when I got home. I'd decompress in different ways. Anything from a hot bath, journaling, or even going for a drive to meditate, while listening to music helped too.
Cuz most parents, population in general, are sensors and they can't see the practical value in your concepts and methods. They prefer instant gratification slash result.

Really sorry to say this but... it's true.

Sent sans PC
 

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Discussion Starter #14
okay, so first off i'm not in a helping field. answering anyway because it has been a sort of consistent sub-theme throughout my life, and i've had plenty of thoughts about it from non-professional exposure to that kind of work.

- If so how did you end up in that position?

as said, i never did anything so intentional as 'i'm going to do this for a living so let me go get myself qualified'. my answer for the informal involvement i have had is that i just sort of drifted sideways into it. it's mostly evolved out of whatever i was already doing in my existing life.

- Is it challenging for you?

when you're not professionally committed to it, the bar is lower and you can pick and choose a bit more. plus, you can just drift back out as soon as you meet a challenge. with that said, the challenges i saw (and which made me decide that this isn't for me) could all be summed up by: i don't know how to take human dynamics and priorities, and stuff them into a kpi kind of metrics framework. so i think if i did take on that kind of work, the problem of how to even define my accountability would do me in. much less the problem of how to meet the definition that i haven't been able to stabilize in my own mind. tl;dr: "boundaries".

- Do you like it?

i like fixing things. and i seriously like the thing of 'knowing' on a low-key but continual basis that i'm bringing something constructive. there is something complex going on with my fi value-set in the back end as well, which i find hard to summarize clearly. it sort of comes down to feeling proud of the fact that what i'm good at is helping other people while not interfering with them. or with the autonomy/privacy that i consider to be of paramount importance #because fi.

or why not?

i'm inherently queasy with the idea itself that i'm getting any of my own [whatever] from thinking about my effect or influence on someone else. so a profession made out of doing that would disturb me ovr the permanent term. i like to hit and run to avoid that entire problem.

less metaphysically, i just get exhausted and end up feeling sort of hollowed out by relentless focus on other people. and also, i get drained by the perpetual moral/ethical math that never stops going on in my own head, trying to compute and build my guidelines on the fly. tldr again: aside from introvert drain, i just dislike the entire question of responsibility, whether it's on the 'good' side of getting a glow, or the 'bad' side of making endless judgment calls that have a human impact.

did you eventually change careers
i didn't change careers since i never had one in that area. but i decided not to have one for the various reasons described. i feel more comfortable in a field where i can just let my analytical brain off the hook and not worry about the collateral implications.
Sorry for the late reply. Work is busy this time of year.

But anyway I got into this field cause like I said in the opening post I love psychology, but due to money and such I was only able to get a associates degree in the field. That pretty much limits me to front line work. I might be able to get more school later on in the future but that isn't an option right now. I do love the theory though. Plus, I have liked helping people for most of my life, but at the same time it has always been difficult for me. Kinda like a double edge sword (but both my parents are INFP, so it likely influenced my fi growing up.)

Is it challenging for me? Yes sometimes it is, mostly when I see someone basically going "My life is hard and it sucks and nothing can make it better and blah, blah, blah." This kind of thing bothers me a lot because while I can empathize with a person who is having a hard time, I struggle when that person doesn't want to actively work to make it better. But other times it is very rewarding when you see someone at their limit and you can give them that extra little push to get through it. But I've also learned to just put on a "work face" on, so that also helps some.

Do I like it? Yes and no. Again some days it can be very rewarding while others very frustrating. I think the whole thing it comes down to is my "black and white" mentality while a barrier in some cases of this work can also help me in others. I don't usually get as personally attached to clients like other co workers can, so this usually helps me make unbiased decisions. However sometimes I do get attached, but I am still usually able to use my Te to act professionally. The down side again is when I feel I have people who don't want to change or don't want to actually put effort in it. This can be frustrating for me...a lot. Another thing is that while my position is just me and one other person, ALL EXCEPT ONE OTHER COWORKER (the accountant) is a FP at the office. This can be...taxing, especially since our office is small and it's hard to avoid people even when doing admin work (which side note might be one of my favorite things to do cause it's just using my Te to plan and prepare for things). I also get to have a lot of freedom in what exactly I do to support clients and such by choosing when I see people, what programs I organize, and where I go to do these things. So the short answer is I really like some parts of it and dislike others. But even as hard as helping people can be, I always feel good when I know I have helped someone. Plus if nothing else this position has helped my fi and "boundaries" improve.

Lastly no, I have not changed careers yet. That is what I am debating right now. Whether to do that or not (or maybe stay in this field but just at a different organization.)
 

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I work with kids, I deliver meals to elderly people, and I work with dogs. The kid job was because my very first job was in daycare. Probably the 2 in me that likes taking care of babies. But I like the psychology of working with older kids (prefer no older than 3) especially when you have to figure out how to deal with behaviors etc. I deliver meals because it was recommended to me by a coworker and pays well enough for me. I get to drive a total of probably an hour and a half alone, which I greatly appreciate, then deliver to an elderly housing unit. They are all very appreciative of the services our company provides. After years of grumpy customers it's nice. And as far as the dogs I grew up with dogs. I also like figuring out the "why" behind unwanted behaviors of dogs and correcting them.
 
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