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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As an INTJ, do you believe you would perform well in the medical field? If so, which aspects do you believe you'd exceed in? I'm also curious to know how many of us are inclined and planning to become doctors (or any health professionals, really) of some sort.

Personally, medicine intrigues me and the mere fact that I can manipulate chemistry, biology, physics, and energy to save or end another's life is quite fascinating. I figure, why not put this interest to good use? I do not plan on practicing medicine where I might have to establish a firm relationship with my patients. Rather a "one-and-done" approach appeals to me more. As in, I speak with a patient, I help a patient, and then I move along -- all in a quick manner. Which is essentially why I'm taking an EMT course and pursuing a degree to become an ER Physician. I never have to be so much gregarious as I am more obligated to do my job, which I like. As opposed to a family physician which might have to be very comely and benevolent to make his/her patients comfortable before actually performing his/her job.
 

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There might be tidbits in this thread that you'd find matches your question - not strictly medical professionals but some who replied are:

http://personalitycafe.com/intj-forum-scientists/500738-can-intjs-do-well-helping-professions.html


My full answer to your question is pretty much on there but my brief answer is I am an occupational therapist which is an allied health profession and I enjoy the analysis and evaluation piece the most, followed by educating clients/patients/families. I do treatment, but it's not necessarily my favorite part.


I thought there was another thread recently asking about nursing or doctors or medical professions and INTJ but I can't find it. :-/
 

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INTJs and the medical field? I dunno, ask him:



Just kidding, I just had to drop this xD

Now more serious: When I was in medic training in the army, the lecturer in our subject "anatomy and physiology" was in fact an INTJ doctor. He was one of the most intelligent and competent persons I've ever encountered in my life and I have much respect for him.
Therefore, I don't see any problem with an INTJ being a doctor and I even think that Ni/Te is a very benefitial set of cognitive functions for this complex subject matter.


I've always been interested in the proffession and this subject as well, but in my country, being a doctor is a very tough job with countless hours of overtime and ill payment (not that it's about the money but I might as well get something out of this very stressful job).

When I was trained to be a medic, I saw that medical education is a very tough path and I simply did not think that I have enough motivation to make it through (also, I didn't want to learn latin).

I respect everybody who chooses to become a doctor and wish you only the best if you choose to do so. Some countries have a good working environment, others don't, so just make sure that you know what you are getting into.
 

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Was interested in medicine as a kid more from a 'mechanics and processes of the body' view. When I discovered medicine was more about 'treating the patient' than science, I decided to steer clear.
Make that "treating the patient despite hospital deficiencies and inefficiencies, interpersonal politics and ignorance in all parts of society regarding health".



I also thought that throughout childhood until I applied for med school, that medicine was about learning the human body, what's its capable of, how it gets destroyed and how to use those principles in order to fix health problems. It turns out it's *a lot more* than that (see the helping professions thread for what I mean), involving more emotional energy, as well as repetitive procedures and tedious routines and 24+++ hour duties at the hospital, than I'm willing to work on.

(During my second clerkship year I left, and am now looking for a field I can sustain a career in, one where there really is more emphasis on problem solving and that allows me to step back for a while to recharge and reflect in order to improve my work. Medicine just doesn't fulfill these (overly needy?) needs of mine.)

What's different with medicine and other academic fields is that no matter how hard you try, you can't ignore the emotional aspect of it, no matter how fickle or annoying it seems. It's a very integral part of a human being, and with the suitable motivation for it (which INTJs are not incapable of having), one can utilize that social-emotional aspect in conjunction with their intellectual prowess to heal the patient.
 

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Long story short, during my second clerkship year I left, and am now looking for a field I can sustain a career in, one where there really is more emphasis on problem solving and that allows me to step back for a while to recharge and reflect in order to improve my work. Medicine just doesn't fulfill these (overly needy?) needs of mine.
Sounds like you might enjoy IT.

It's all about problem solving, but you get to work with machines instead of people. Much less emotionally demanding. Almost as rewarding if you get to work on a challenging project, like designing and implementing an enterprise scale network upgrade for a community college, or a hotel, or a distribution center or something. Though, most of the entry level work is just monkey work, troubleshooting, doing routine maintenance for small businesses, things like that. If you keep at it for a few years and get higher level certifications, you can apply for the cool jobs where you get to manage a team and do something important. Then it's just a matter of in-house specialization - knowing that you need to jiggle the handle after you flush, that sort of thing.

Pay is pretty good too. Not as much as medicine, but definitely enough to live comfortably.
 

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My impression of medicine is that its a highly complex area with way too much factual info (specific terms for body parts, latin) to remember. I suck at remembering specific facts. Id probably be more successful in first aid than as a surgeon or general doctor (to whom people go to for check ups or random illnesses). I have no interest in going into medicine but if you think it suits you, then study it by all means
 

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Currently, I'm in school for Radiography. I'll get back to you when I get a job, and let you know how well I take to it. But the schooling part is great, because I love the sciences. The whole talking to patients part will be the least appealing aspect of my future job, I'm sure.

I'm already pretty much planning that I'll end up continuing my education so that I can end up in a biolab some day, which means less interaction with the general public --yay! But one thing at a time.
 

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I have an INTJ friend who wants to become a surgeon. He said something like "God, no, I'm not in for helping or caring for people. I just want to see what's inside of the human body, to see what makes us tick etc." I think that INTJ can be a good doctor in terms of performance and as you said, the best approach would be not trying too hard to make a connection with patients, especially if the said INTJ doesn't really have high empathy skill.
 

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I hate the medical field. I hated biology and chemistry so much >.< (was good in them tho) but pooh >.<
It makes me feel like a bag of blood with layers of skin and muscles. And being in a hospital that much and seeing well... sick people and people in pain and such? Nope.

I need to be in a warmer environment to heal and be more human.
 

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My INTJ friend had gone thru medical school but decided after graduation that being a doctor wasn''t his calling.

Dr. House is a fantasy. In most hospital settings he would not survive the hospital administration. My friend's way of being a doctor is very Dr. House like because he's a maverick and a risk taker. He realized that he'd be eternally frustrated for not being able to do things his way.


However, I can see an INTJ being a medical examiner or a coroner. It's like solving a puzzle, most fascinating. And nobody gets hurt (the subject's already dead).
 

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Currently, I work in the OR, so there's not a lot of patient contact, though I had more than usual this week, which I liked. I prefer to have enough time to explain things to patients and answer questions for them. A relationship with a patient is very different from other types of relationships. I pretty much just have to be myself--not emotionally involved, sharing knowledge, calm, not losing sight of what's important--and patients appreciate it.

I've considered as one possible exit plan from my career, becoming a PA and going right back to neurology. Not a doctor, because I'm not willing to do all the hoop-jumping required to get there. My only concerns are not having enough time to explain things to patients and make sure they really understand, and that I doubt I'd enjoy treatment anywhere near as much as I enjoy diagnosis.
 

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Science truly fills my heart with joy and excitement. I feel most fulfilled when my brain is mentally piecing together all aspects and systems of things I am studying. I would go into the medical field, but I am not a people person. I could excel there if I wanted to, but I don't. I intend to major in Neurology.

One of the reasons I chose this field is because there is always new information and knowledge to learn or discover. I can hardly wait to employ cool new technologies in the future.
 

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I know one INTJ in real life who's a PT. He's always been passionate about the profession.

He's very efficient and pragmatic while working with patients and knows their expectations and needs.
If he has limited time to work with a patient - he manages to do it, very efficiently. Better than many colleagues I know.
That's why he receives a lot of respect from patients.

He is always focused on the results - if his approach will work in the end. There's also no unnecessary nagging about useless details. He knows what's most important in every segment of work, in other words - he knows what he's doing.

We were once in a team and it was perfect with him.

INTJs can be masters in any field. It just has to be something they're into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I hate the medical field. I hated biology and chemistry so much >.< (was good in them tho) but pooh >.<
It makes me feel like a bag of blood with layers of skin and muscles. And being in a hospital that much and seeing well... sick people and people in pain and such? Nope.

I need to be in a warmer environment to heal and be more human.
You impress me as more of an F. Perhaps you should review the Types again and reevaluate yourself. Remember to be honest with yourself. Stay conscious of not only your strengths but also your weaknesses (and if you're familiar with the Johari Window -- come into the knowledge of your Open -- and Blind, and Hidden if you're capable) and review each type as a whole. I notice that when I consider myself and my personality, it generally takes me quite a bit of analysis and somewhat thinking in circles to concretely decide which aspects apply to me and which don't and, generally, this process requires a very objective (or, as objective as the subjective can get) viewpoint on myself.
 

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I'm a speech-language pathologist, which means my graduate training and career involve a combination of the medical, science, and education fields. The work I do requires me to constantly research, analyze, innovate, test new ideas, solve complex problems, and improve upon what's already being done. What's not to love? I think I have an easier time with this job than many others because I am objective and logical, so I'm not easily swayed by emotional outbursts from kids or adults. Plus, at the end of the day, I can come home to a quiet house and recharge from the day's efforts.

It's not a job for everyone, regardless of personality, but I enjoy it.
 

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I am a medical technologist, and it suits my personality perfectly. The education part was fascinating: biology, biochemistry, pathology, immunology, plus learning all the machines and techniques used in the lab. The day to day is... what you make of it. It can be very repetitive. But for me it has the right mix of stress and downtime. During downtime, my mind is free to wander or brush up on theory, or figure out ways to work more efficiently when it gets busy. Or socialize, ha ha ha.

The best part is indirectly helping people without having any patient contact. And pretty much no teamwork. I can deal with other people as much as I want, more or less.

I considered medical school, pathology specifically, but decided against it because of the debt it would incur and the time it would take. There's more to life than work, I have other hobbies and wanted a family. Now I'm in my 30's, my student loan debt is ancient history and I have a family that I can care for because I can afford to work part time. I've also been saving for retirement over ten years already.
 

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You impress me as more of an F. Perhaps you should review the Types again and reevaluate yourself. Remember to be honest with yourself. Stay conscious of not only your strengths but also your weaknesses (and if you're familiar with the Johari Window -- come into the knowledge of your Open -- and Blind, and Hidden if you're capable) and review each type as a whole. I notice that when I consider myself and my personality, it generally takes me quite a bit of analysis and somewhat thinking in circles to concretely decide which aspects apply to me and which don't and, generally, this process requires a very objective (or, as objective as the subjective can get) viewpoint on myself.
Thank you for your concern.
 

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You impress me as more of an F. Perhaps you should review the Types again and reevaluate yourself. Remember to be honest with yourself. Stay conscious of not only your strengths but also your weaknesses (and if you're familiar with the Johari Window -- come into the knowledge of your Open -- and Blind, and Hidden if you're capable) and review each type as a whole. I notice that when I consider myself and my personality, it generally takes me quite a bit of analysis and somewhat thinking in circles to concretely decide which aspects apply to me and which don't and, generally, this process requires a very objective (or, as objective as the subjective can get) viewpoint on myself.
Smooth
 

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I'm an EMT as well and I love the fast nature of it. Get your patient, use your knowledge to figure out what's wrong, stabilize them and transfer to higher care. No extended contact. The environment is continually changing, you never know what you're going to come upon, but your knowledge base allows you to deal with it. Each patient teaches you something new.

Oh, and I get to practice my skills on the ski slopes :)
 
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