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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, me again...

I'm on my last year of highschool, so I'm starting to think a lot more about college.

My first option would be physics, for one day I would like to be a scientist. I like that idea a lot, it would be rly great if I could one day even get my PhD.

But I was wondering what do you guys (and girls :p) think about physics + INTP.

Is it a good match? I mean, I know Einstein was an INTP but still I am starting to second-guess myself.
So, yea... What do you think?
 

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If you're into it, go for it. I wish that one of the countless math and physics teachers I had lodge been capable of interesting me for the subject. These days I find both immensely intriguing but never had the proper education to understand the interesting bits.
Internet hooked me up with physics. Not those boring teachers... Studying physics is my hobby for the last year or so. But I don't study those boring easy things like those you learn in highschool, I'm going for the real stuff.

:crazy:
 

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Well... physics was always my best subject. So why not.
Most important thing is if you like it or not.
 
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Physics intrigues me but its really not my thing.
 

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Hey guys, me again...

I'm on my last year of highschool, so I'm starting to think a lot more about collage.

My first option would be physics, for one day I would like to be a scientist. I like that idea a lot, it would be rly great if I could one day even get my PhD.

But I was wondering what do you guys (and girls :p) think about physics + INTP.

Is it a good match? I mean, I know Einstein was an INTP but still I am starting to second-guess myself.
So, yea... What do you think?
In general, it's a good match, with lots of theories and puzzles to solve; I used to like physics but now I kind of despise it. It's starting to get too complicated (much more than maths, which I love), is a lot less theoretical and elegant. Plus I have a really shitty teacher so that might be the reason why I don't really like it. Same with chemistry.
What is precisely the field that interests you? Electrotechnics; pure physics? I've heard those aren't really the easiest to finish but at least you'd get a job much easier than with, say, any social science. On top of that, if you really like it, then I'd say there's no need to overthink.

Also, college. Unless you're an artist.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
In general, it's a good match, with lots of theories and puzzles to solve; I used to like physics but now I kind of despise it. It's starting to get too complicated (much more than maths, which I love), is a lot less theoretical and elegant. Plus I have a really shitty teacher so that might be the reason why I don't really like it. Same with chemistry.
What is precisely the field that interests you? Electrotechnics; pure physics? I've heard those aren't really the easiest to finish but at least you'd get a job much easier than with, say, any social science. On top of that, if you really like it, then I'd say there's no need to overthink.
Pure physics. Theoretical physics as a PhD if I ever get that far...

Nothing was hard for me since I entered the school system (exept reading, I had dyslexia and dysgraphia).
So I see no reason why any college would be impossible for me to graduate.

Yea, I guess its a good match for me. I'll probably go with that, so we will see how that ends up.
 

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Definitely go for it. I'm going for the same thing. :crazy: But about the PhD. I don't know, a lot of people I've talked to said it's a waste of time. I still recommend it though, and I'm still weighing my options. :happy:

Edit: Oh and learn on your own as much as you can because the pace at which everyone else goes, even in college, is mind numbingly slow.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Definitely go for it. I'm going for the same thing. :crazy: But about the PhD. I don't know, a lot of people I've talked to said it's a waste of time. I still recommend it though, and I'm still weighing my options. :happy:
Great to hear that Psychosmurf!
Well, I would like to 'waste my time' if it would actually made me better at my field and possibly give me a better job/position?
 

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Great to hear that Psychosmurf!
Well, I would like to 'waste my time' if it would actually made me better at my field and possibly give me a better job/position?
Aiming for the university professor job?
 

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Aiming for the university professor job?
Well, not really... But you neven know.

I was just thinking PhD could give me better chance of getting a job outside my own country. In EU or USA...
 

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I think it's a great idea. Always choose something you're interested in. I did applied psychology for my first degree, and I had a blast. I'm sure it'd be the same for you! :wink:
 

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It's also possible that the people I heard that from might have had a completely different idea of what "waste of time" means. :proud: I'm just looking for the path that will get me the greatest amount of independence.
 

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Here's my thoughts.

Fuck College.

I wouldn't spend a sum of 100,000 dollars to learn something that I can learn myself and for just a slip of paper. And if you really wanted that slip of paper, go to some community college and then to another college to get your degree. Because no one cares what college you graduate from unless you're aiming to be one of those jobs that are so low in demand that I don't know why you're taking them anyway.

I'm not very experienced with this, but I wouldn't go for a PHD. Something in the back of my mind tells me it's not worth it, and with the rising cost for tuition due to inflation, by the time you try out for it, it's just not worth it.

Mainly because there are tonnes of people out there who have a college degree, graduated from a prestigious school and are unemployed.

The (Un)employment Chronicles: Voices Of The Degreed And Jobless

If money is your primary objective, go for being a chemist engineer. Those are currently in real high demand, and are probably the closest thing to physics you can get.
 

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From my experience it's easy for your type to grasp the concepts, I'm in the field myself but I have to spend more time to understand the logic so my INTP boyfriend who isn't in physics helps me :p go figure :p So if you like it, go for it! Physics are beautiful especially quantum mechanics and astronomy.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Here's my thoughts.

Fuck College.

I wouldn't spend a sum of 100,000 dollars to learn something that I can learn myself and for just a slip of paper. And if you really wanted that slip of paper, go to some community college and then to another college to get your degree. Because no one cares what college you graduate from unless you're aiming to be one of those jobs that are so low in demand that I don't know why you're taking them anyway.

I'm not very experienced with this, but I wouldn't go for a PHD. Something in the back of my mind tells me it's not worth it, and with the rising cost for tuition due to inflation, by the time you try out for it, it's just not worth it.

Mainly because there are tonnes of people out there who have a college degree, graduated from a prestigious school and are unemployed.

The (Un)employment Chronicles: Voices Of The Degreed And Jobless

If money is your primary objective, go for being a chemist engineer. Those are currently in real high demand, and are probably the closest thing to physics you can get.
Im not from USA so my college is not that expensive. So thats not the problem. We don't have those community colleges or something like that.

And I'm not aiming for the money. Because if I was, I wouldn't even go to college. I would start my own buisness.

From my experience it's easy for your type to grasp the concepts, I'm in the field myself but I have to spend more time to understand the logic so my INTP boyfriend who isn't in physics helps me :p go figure :p So if you like it, go for it! Physics are beautiful especially quantum mechanics and astronomy.
Indeed :)


It's also possible that the people I heard that from might have had a completely different idea of what "waste of time" means. :proud: I'm just looking for the path that will get me the greatest amount of independence.
Me too...
 

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I absolutely love physics, and am seriously contemplating it as a possible college major and even career path, with theoretical physics being my area of greatest interest.

Many others in the thread have said this, but I think that in general the INTP is a good match for the subject, especially the theoretical and "avant-garde science" areas.
 

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This INTP went and got a physics degree and here's how it went...

First and foremost, you need to understand the difference between Ti and Te. In physics, no one cares about Ti, so you will have to learn how to communicate 100% objectively with Te. If you are not comfortable with this now, look into it. On a similar note, Ne is friggin' powerful in cranking out physics problems. My friends used to envy how effortlessly I could set up problems. But then I sucked at cranking through the math (Te).

What sort of questions do you really want to ask about the universe. Are you comfortable denying the existence of subjectivity and Jung's irrational functions of sensing and intuition? The sciences strip away half of the lived human reality, and do so unabashedly. Some questions cannot be answered with math. Be sure that you are not really curious about those questions. Three years into my physics degree, I realized I was interested in the study of consciousness as the lived experience of being. Physics could say jack and shit about this, so I changed majors to religion (Buddhism) and picked up a philosophy minor.

This worked out well for me, and I regret nothing. The physics training helped me be more patient and logical about the mind and it also made me overtly aware of the blind spots contained in the methodology of Physics. One of the greatest conclusions I reached was that materialism as a worldview, while extraordinary useful, when applied to one's self and one's own subjective experience, is a religion that degrades the human being. Many people don't really care about this as this orientation has become the status quo ever since the "enlightenment" but I contest that this maneuver threw the baby out with the bath water. If you do or don't study physics, you may want to keep this in mind.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
This INTP went and got a physics degree and here's how it went...

First and foremost, you need to understand the difference between Ti and Te. In physics, no one cares about Ti, so you will have to learn how to communicate 100% objectively with Te. If you are not comfortable with this now, look into it. On a similar note, Ne is friggin' powerful in cranking out physics problems. My friends used to envy how effortlessly I could set up problems. But then I sucked at cranking through the math (Te).

What sort of questions do you really want to ask about the universe. Are you comfortable denying the existence of subjectivity and Jung's irrational functions of sensing and intuition? The sciences strip away half of the lived human reality, and do so unabashedly. Some questions cannot be answered with math. Be sure that you are not really curious about those questions. Three years into my physics degree, I realized I was interested in the study of consciousness as the lived experience of being. Physics could say jack and shit about this, so I changed majors to religion (Buddhism) and picked up a philosophy minor.

This worked out well for me, and I regret nothing. The physics training helped me be more patient and logical about the mind and it also made me overtly aware of the blind spots contained in the methodology of Physics. One of the greatest conclusions I reached was that materialism as a worldview, while extraordinary useful, when applied to one's self and one's own subjective experience, is a religion that degrades the human being. Many people don't really care about this as this orientation has become the status quo ever since the "enlightenment" but I contest that this maneuver threw the baby out with the bath water. If you do or don't study physics, you may want to keep this in mind.
Thanks for the reply...

Philosophy is probably the biggest part of who I am, thats for sure. But I belive that focusing on Physics as a career and then as a hobby possibly studying and writing philosophy books could work very well. I want to see the truth as far as I can and possibly one day help to reach even higher understanding of the universe trough Science AND philosphy.

I also adore poetry and writing. So when I would only be a philosopher and a writer I think I would become sooo frustrated with this world, so pessimistic and self-hating that would result in a totally wasted life...
 
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