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I am an IT Consultant working towards being a security analyst/architect. I have done everything career wise. Construction, Banking, Restraunts, Sales and office work.

IT is dynamic. I can do whatever I want most of the time. I don't have a boss breathing down my neck constantly and I am allowed a large amount of freedom and decision making. I use skills I have learned and I get to learn constantly. I do have to talk to people though (which I do not always like). I suggest taking the Belbin Team Roles test to find out where your current team strengths are. Mine are Thinking, Questioning and for some reason a Peacemaker.
 
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Currently I do administrative work in the Oil and Gas Industry. It's an okay job. Decent pay, good benefits, not stressful. But I want to start looking into other things as I turn 30 on June 4th and do not know if Oil and Gas is right for me. I like the idea of Electrical Engineering, but I've never proven myself in math. I also had a lot of emotional disruption as a children do to inept parents and other life challenges, which I am finally clearing out of my brain - hopefully opening up new avenues and more effective learning of complex subjects.

I would like to work in something, ultimately, that offers good money and job stability. Alternative energy, electric cars, etc, interest me a lot - if they are not just hype! But I also don't want to be a job like computer programming, which I expect is sitting at a computer all day being expected to be a human computer chip, like advanced and technical data entry.
 

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In high school, I wanted to be a pilot & was thinking about joining the military.

Ended up going to college for engineering because I thought that was easier than having to fight my way into a pilot career. I struggled a bit with calculus, but more with physics. Continued on for a year and a half because I was stubborn. I ended up failing Differential Equations and the next physics courses. When I finally realized that I could not hold up to the pressure of being at that depth of math and science, I changed to computer science.

Now at the end of my first semester in computer science, I can say I really did enjoy programming and I will be sticking with it.
 

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I received my bachelors in physics last May. As I type this, I'm sitting at the front desk of LA Fitness lol. I can't find any jobs here in Florida (not even a lab tech position), and the few interviews I've had were unsuccessful. So I'm moving back to NY and trying there. I see a lot more positions I feel qualified for (like a lab technician)there , and I would like to go to graduate school in NY anyway (either medical or nuclear physics, still haven't fully decided yet.) I just wanna to find a job that's better than entry level customer service to hold me down up to/through grad school lol.

Also Ive been slowly teaching myself about investing and topics in finance. I've had an interest in economics, but didn't learn about the relation between physics and finance until last year. If I knew I most likely would have minored in economics at least.

Ideally I just wanna learn physics, make my money through the stocks, work out and smoke weed all day lol. I'd teach a class or two occasionally, but it would have to be a topic I find very interesting.
 

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They probably don't make my dream job, because it'd have NOTHING to do with sales (and it seems, lately, every job has some sales element). For instance, I think I'd like to, for instance, tutor in social sciences and humanities. All the things I like about teaching, without the performance aspect (one on one) or the bureacracy and office politics.
 

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I am an IT Consultant working towards being a security analyst/architect. I have done everything career wise. Construction, Banking, Restraunts, Sales and office work.

IT is dynamic. I can do whatever I want most of the time. I don't have a boss breathing down my neck constantly and I am allowed a large amount of freedom and decision making. I use skills I have learned and I get to learn constantly. I do have to talk to people though (which I do not always like). I suggest taking the Belbin Team Roles test to find out where your current team strengths are. Mine are Thinking, Questioning and for some reason a Peacemaker.
How did you move into IT? Did you get a degree/diploma? What factors influenced choosing IT Security?
 

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I was studying IT but then I dropped out, now I'm studying Business and thinking of working as Business Analyst after I graduate but I'm worried that corporate boring structure maybe not be a good place for me.. I like the idea of being an entrepreneur but I don't have any innovative idea at the moment and since I'm getting close to my thirties I start to think more of my future and making more realistic decisions
 

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How did you move into IT? Did you get a degree/diploma? What factors influenced choosing IT Security?
I don't have a degree in IT, I went to school for construction management. I got an entry level job in IT and worked my butt off. Here I am now. It helps that I am amazing at interviewing though.
 
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I work for Dell as a "Deployment Engineer" or "IT Project Management Sr. Analyst" depending upon which of the ever-evolving job titles you prefer, but essentially I'm a code monkey. I support a legacy app I wrote in VB6 (which is basically how I got into this gig, since I started out as a contract tech), the mass of javascript that goes with it, as well as a set of QuickBase portals and front-end clients written in AutoIT and VBA macro-enabled workbooks in Excel.

My current career is the longest and most rewarding I've had to date (almost 5 years going back to when I started as a tech). Before this I worked as a cable guy for Comcast for about a year and a half. I loved the troubleshooting aspect of the job (I enjoy solving puzzles), but unfortunately that was more of the minority. Much of the work consisted of construction and craftsmanship, which was not exactly up my alley. It was surprising I lasted as long as I did, really, but then that was the first time I had a job where I figured "I'm going to try this out and keep showing up every day until I die or get fired." Well, I'm still alive, so as it turns out it was the latter. All in all, not a job I was suited for, but it challenged me in a number of ways and through all the pain I'm grateful for the experience.

Before Comcast I've worked at 4 different call centers, never lasting any longer than 6 months at each. I've been a waiter, an "inventory specialist" (for one super terrible day), an assistant at a library (second best job I've ever had, as short as it was), and even tried taking out some ads and running a small on-site PC support business.

So, yeah, that's pretty much my career history in a nutshell. I have an assortment of hobbies and programming is just one, and one I at one point resolved was just going to be a side thing (I've done some game development for fun), but I found an opportunity and took it. Programming is great for me because I can be creative, while at the same time building something incrementally with near-immediate results. Those results may be mundane to a vast majority of people who don't get excited about "the possibilities(!)" demonstrated in some obscure API you just figured out how to use in a novel way, but they're there nonetheless. I enjoy other things like writing fiction, but I've known too many people that get irritated with me sharing a work in progress, so it doesn't feed my Fe-kick or whatever I guess. With programming you can make something relatively useful with half an hour of coding, and then keep building from there.

Anyhow... </ramble>
 

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I just recently read about a field of work that might interest INTPs: forensic linguistics. I could see myself doing that.

Many years ago I visited a random internet chat room and started talking with someone who seemed interesting. Later we wrote a few letters, but somehow the connection faded. About a year later I went to another random chat room and started a conversation with someone. After only a few minutes I started suspecting it could be the same person I had previously been chatting with. I asked him directly and it was him - I had recognized him from the use of one word. Again we changed a few emails and again it didn't go far. Another year passed and I stumbled across a website where people shared their poems and short stories. The style of one of the stories sounded really familiar and I was almost certain it was the same guy again - and it was. (No, this isn't going to evolve into a cute love story. This is the end.) That got me even more interested in language.
 

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I just recently read about a field of work that might interest INTPs: forensic linguistics. I could see myself doing that.

Many years ago I visited a random internet chat room and started talking with someone who seemed interesting. Later we wrote a few letters, but somehow the connection faded. About a year later I went to another random chat room and started a conversation with someone. After only a few minutes I started suspecting it could be the same person I had previously been chatting with. I asked him directly and it was him - I had recognized him from the use of one word. Again we changed a few emails and again it didn't go far. Another year passed and I stumbled across a website where people shared their poems and short stories. The style of one of the stories sounded really familiar and I was almost certain it was the same guy again - and it was. (No, this isn't going to evolve into a cute love story. This is the end.) That got me even more interested in language.
Forensic linguistics does sound interesting ,I might have to look more into that, I've always been interested in forensics ... But not overly skilled in linguistics, I can read French but can't speak it , though I am attempting to improve I'm trying to learn Dutch my girlfriend and I are both attempting to learn it ... But that's not really relevant I'm taking network admin myself while interesting is not entirely what I want to be doing in the long run
 

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I just recently read about a field of work that might interest INTPs: forensic linguistics. I could see myself doing that.

Many years ago I visited a random internet chat room and started talking with someone who seemed interesting. Later we wrote a few letters, but somehow the connection faded. About a year later I went to another random chat room and started a conversation with someone. After only a few minutes I started suspecting it could be the same person I had previously been chatting with. I asked him directly and it was him - I had recognized him from the use of one word. Again we changed a few emails and again it didn't go far. Another year passed and I stumbled across a website where people shared their poems and short stories. The style of one of the stories sounded really familiar and I was almost certain it was the same guy again - and it was. (No, this isn't going to evolve into a cute love story. This is the end.) That got me even more interested in language.
So how does this relate at all to a full-blown career option for any human being...???
 

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So how does this relate at all to a full-blown career option for any human being...???
Well it's loosely linked in the sense that forensic linguistics try (among other things) to find out if certain texts were written by the same person. I enjoy noticing different styles in people's writing and find the idea of doing it as work quite fascinating.
 

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l like working with languages, currently l study norwegian, french and swedish at the college. ln my spare time l do translations (english->romanian). l find translating a very refreshing activity for me, l always keep learning new/interesting things from what l have to translate. Occasionally l'm also doing graphic design (logos).

ps: a friend mentioned once something about computational linguistics, that's an option too
 

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I was initially going to school for journalism but have now decided on computer programming.. wondering what other INTP's have found to be fulfilling career choices.
Both the INTP females I know are psychologists. One is a straight A student from a ridiculous overachieving family. The other is just very smart, more regular upbringing. Not sure if it reflects the type or not, but both of them are cutish, and both have polyamorous hearts, but their actual relationships look from the outside to be traditional monogamous.

You are the first INTP I have seen choose an engineering type activity for a career. Normally I think of INTP types doing more pure science activities, typically sciences with a lot of theoretical activity.
 
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I've actually chosen a woodsman'ish career. Physically challenging work lets me sleep at night, when there's no energy left for my brain to keep spinning. There's a lot of different types of work, a lot of guidelines to follow, a lot of risk assessment. You don't just grab a chainsaw and head for the first tree you see anymore, that was a lifetime ago ;) I also do quality checks on the performance of my colleagues, aswell as trying to find more efficient ways to do everything.
I feel more relaxed working by myself though, in a nature environment. I generally second-guess myself more with people around, and I don't feel comfortable working in-doors. Also, enjoying my work is for me more important than having a better than average salary.
 

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I'm currently studying for a cand.ling.merc. that will hopefully lead me to a job that concerns intercultural communication of some kind. Right now I'm thinking something like in a consultancy firm or something but idk... I just really like communication, language and the intercultural aspect provides a very cool and stimulating spin on that I think. :)
 

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I am personally leaning towards forensic science myself as a career.
 
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