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Both the INTP females I know are psychologists. One is a straight A student from a ridiculous overachieving family. The other is just very smart, more regular upbringing. Not sure if it reflects the type or not, but both of them are cutish, and both have polyamorous hearts, but their actual relationships look from the outside to be traditional monogamous.

You are the first INTP I have seen choose an engineering type activity for a career. Normally I think of INTP types doing more pure science activities, typically sciences with a lot of theoretical activity.
Actually, there's a lot about computer science that has to do with theoretical activity and problem solving. A lot of the algorithms for the programs I design are purely derived from logic. I don't even write any of the code until I make sure that the logic is sound. In the end, it's quite satisfying because writing and compiling the code is simply a way to verify that I didn't leave any logical errors. When you look into the mathematical theory behind it all, it becomes quite beautiful.

I suppose the reasons that INTPs may go into programming are different than other types. We don't necessarily care about the finished product.
 
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@Janelle
Very few people ever find what they want to do. The best most can do, especially INTPs, is to find what they don't want, and that takes time, as you seem to already be aware. Philosophy can help with that. Take a few courses. INTPs are the best suited for its rigor and are the most likely to find enjoyment in it. I majored in philosophy as an undergraduate after trying out several other things, and now I am still reading and writing it, blogging, and revising and adding to old essays out of pure enjoyment. I am also applying for graduate programs. I still don't know "what I want to do", but I have a few general ideas. One of my distant-future goals is to devise a plan to incorporate more critical thinking into elementary school curriculums.

Philosophy is the only subject is intellectually fulfilling for me. I cannot imagine that anyone who thinks similar as I do (INTPs) could possibly have a fulfilling life without being exposed to it to some degree. The reasoning and critical thinking skills philosophy builds are vital and universally applicable.

Good luck!
 

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I have 4 INTPs in my life, all guys. One is a stock analyst and trader. He's very good at it and made a lot of money to retire early (he's in his late 50s early 60s and have been retired for more than 10 years). One is a director of communication system at a major cable company. One is a successful coder (not your run of the mill coder but a 20-year veteran that gets recruiting inquiry all the time). One is a real estate analyst.

The first 3 found their passion early on and made it a career. The last one fell into the field but his true passion is to see the world. It took him about 10 years to reconcile his job and his passion. Now he takes every vacation day from work to travel. His only expense, other than rent, is traveling.
 
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Apolo, I went down a similar route. From military, to management, and now I'm not sure where to go. I was think either something to do with history, balancing budgets, or a computer related field. I had to make and edit a video for a presentation in college and it was pretty addicting.
 

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My degree is in the field of public administration. My PhD is going to be dedicated to the education policy and now I'm actually a doctoral student in the Institute of Education directly, not any Public administration school anymore.
***
Choosing career path in the high school I had hard times, couldn't decide should I go into some sort of engineering or do anything more social or management. The main goal was to choose the profession where I can apply my skills and talents to fulfill my potential at max and bring some positive impact into society. I went with public administration cause I got tired of hearing how people complain about government and wanted to make it work better and also cause I thought that at engineering I could be just ordinary good but my chances to make something profound were pretty low.
After getting degree I decided that the best field for me to focus on is the education policy so now I started to write my PhD dissertation about it. And actually I find education system and teaching theories pretty fascinating field of work and hoping to be a professor at the university one day who also works for government creating better education policy.

Oh, and I actually took part in few social and education projects as the team member or leader as the student when I joint some International Youth organization, but that was volunteering so I'm not sure if this counts.

The main struggle - I see how to make things better, I know what data I should analyze, I can define the main issues and but this all requires from me to lead and administrate people and this is where my introvert part wanna hide under the blanket and never go out. From the other side, I kinda enjoy teaching and guiding others.
 

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Oh, and about other INTPs I know. The female one got the same degree I do - public administration and she also works in the University too now :D But she didn't go for PhD, at least yet. And the male one got degree in some biomedical engineering sort of things, and he is getting PhD there now too, but he works in IT. I am not quite sure if he likes that, I guess routine annoys him but he hopes to go into freelance and work for only interesting projects after he gets enough experience to have a nice resume for that. So I guess he kinda likes the field in general
 

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My dream is to be a lawyer because of my fascination and love for crime documentaries and also of my family background
But also it is hard because there are so many interesting opportunities in the world and I do have a good knowledge when it comes to electronics and also computing programming. I initially wanted to be a manager so I started studying economics and business for my O/L( ordinary levels) and A/L(note these are educational qualifications similar to SAT but it is the UK version :p ) but I lost interest and now I am happy that I am doing my major in law because of I am happy it is indeed trial and error as you don't know where life takes you
But it is passion and interest after all that rules us and defines our paths.
 

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Actually, there's a lot about computer science that has to do with theoretical activity and problem solving. A lot of the algorithms for the programs I design are purely derived from logic. I don't even write any of the code until I make sure that the logic is sound. In the end, it's quite satisfying because writing and compiling the code is simply a way to verify that I didn't leave any logical errors. When you look into the mathematical theory behind it all, it becomes quite beautiful.

I suppose the reasons that INTPs may go into programming are different than other types. We don't necessarily care about the finished product.
Sure, but there is a big difference between teaching computer science (or studying it or using it as an adjunct to another science) and being a computer engineer. The former studies pure ideas and the latter commits to specific solutions on a deadline.
 
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@Janelle
Very few people ever find what they want to do. The best most can do, especially INTPs, is to find what they don't want, and that takes time, as you seem to already be aware. Philosophy can help with that. Take a few courses. INTPs are the best suited for its rigor and are the most likely to find enjoyment in it. I majored in philosophy as an undergraduate after trying out several other things, and now I am still reading and writing it, blogging, and revising and adding to old essays out of pure enjoyment. I am also applying for graduate programs. I still don't know "what I want to do", but I have a few general ideas. One of my distant-future goals is to devise a plan to incorporate more critical thinking into elementary school curriculums.

Philosophy is the only subject is intellectually fulfilling for me. I cannot imagine that anyone who thinks similar as I do (INTPs) could possibly have a fulfilling life without being exposed to it to some degree. The reasoning and critical thinking skills philosophy builds are vital and universally applicable.

Good luck!
WOW. I have to wholly agree with every single word you said.

That must be nice being a philosopher. That's my dream job, actually. Problem is, I live in a country where the #1 rule is: In order to be success/happy/fulfilled/etc, you have to be as rich as possible. And the #2 rule is: If you don't have a minimum of 2-story house, then even if you're as smart as Albert Einstein or as talented as Mozart, then you're still fucked. Granted, I live in a country where the SJs, who upholds security as the most important thing in live, are dominating. That's why pure science, history, and philosophy aren't popular here.

That's why I have to choose architecture. You know, society pressure.

But philosophy, especially analytical philosophy, is my true, first, and only love. Seriously. I'd rather be philosopher as poor as dirt, than to be a filthy rich architect.
 

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I wanted to be a graphic artist for awhile; then I thought about animation (most likely gaming). However, that didn't feel right, and I couldn't think of anything I liked. Recently, I thought about being a Geneticist but it's too expensive. So, now I want to become a Forensic Scientist.

I remembered reading these series of books about Forensics and just being excited about it all. Though, I never considered it as a career. It seems like it may be a long road to get there.
 
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WOW. I have to wholly agree with every single word you said.

That must be nice being a philosopher. That's my dream job, actually. Problem is, I live in a country where the #1 rule is: In order to be success/happy/fulfilled/etc, you have to be as rich as possible. And the #2 rule is: If you don't have a minimum of 2-story house, then even if you're as smart as Albert Einstein or as talented as Mozart, then you're still fucked. Granted, I live in a country where the SJs, who upholds security as the most important thing in live, are dominating. That's why pure science, history, and philosophy aren't popular here.

That's why I have to choose architecture. You know, society pressure.

But philosophy, especially analytical philosophy, is my true, first, and only love. Seriously. I'd rather be philosopher as poor as dirt, than to be a filthy rich architect.
Thanks for the kind words. Unfortunately, though, even here in America, the SJs rule as well (to a large degree) because they are the most likely to conform to the existing ideologies and resist new ideas. For "pure science, history, and philosophy" to prosper, one must undertake an unbelievable amount of scrutiny until popular opinion shifts in their favor. Most of the time, that never happens; if it does, it is not until long after that great thinker is dead and gone.

I cannot agree with you more that a most difficult task is to make money and survive in society while also remaining honest in one's work and interests. We just do the best we can, and the INTP's Ti function is an advantageous tool in developing such a balance. Doing honest, pure work and sharing new ideas is only accepted in small pockets, usually outside of the institutional environments of academia and business. So, yes, philosophizing is a tough business mainly because it is not a "business" at all in the conventional SJ sense. Philosophy's insights are not tangibly, monetarily productive in the ways that other fields are. However, perhaps for that very reason, its insights are the most fundamental, pure, and fulfilling.
 

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I want to get a bachelors degree in computer engineering technology. The reason I choose that career is because math is really my strength. I don't want to choose something that I'm not interested in or is NOT my strength, like journalism or literature. :rolleyes:
 

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You are the first INTP I have seen choose an engineering type activity for a career. Normally I think of INTP types doing more pure science activities, typically sciences with a lot of theoretical activity.
I'm leaning more towards getting into computer engineering technology, which I hear is different than computer engineering itself. I haven't officially made a decision yet.
 

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WOW. I have to wholly agree with every single word you said.

That must be nice being a philosopher. That's my dream job, actually. Problem is, I live in a country where the #1 rule is: In order to be success/happy/fulfilled/etc, you have to be as rich as possible. And the #2 rule is: If you don't have a minimum of 2-story house, then even if you're as smart as Albert Einstein or as talented as Mozart, then you're still fucked. Granted, I live in a country where the SJs, who upholds security as the most important thing in live, are dominating. That's why pure science, history, and philosophy aren't popular here.

That's why I have to choose architecture. You know, society pressure.

But philosophy, especially analytical philosophy, is my true, first, and only love. Seriously. I'd rather be philosopher as poor as dirt, than to be a filthy rich architect.
Your wife and children thank you

Source: the future
 

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I was initially going to school for journalism but have now decided on computer programming.. wondering what other INTP's have found to be fulfilling career choices.
I'm a front end developer that still does some back end (small software-as-a-service co.). Has been very good to me. However, I started in print design, moved to programming and now do both all day in some form (but less the print design, but still design). I like the autonomy that his co. gives me for my work.

I have also enjoyed learning businesses and processes, political economy, law and various other interests. I've been trying to shove all of this together ever since liking them. However, my current job and atmosphere allows a bit of this thinking from time to time and I feel fortunate for it. :proud:

I also have lots of people that I speak to frequently/infrequently that are in journalism, marketing, and various other jobs all of it interesting if you tailor it to yourself... unless it's a lot of people all the time all the time.

With marketing the more reserved people did more market research and analysis, in journalism it was investigative reporting and for some something they felt that it had importance, was interesting but needed someone to stand up.

I'm a student that said that I create my education. If you saw the courses I took you'd wonder if it had any relevance to my career -- well, I beat business students at their own courses from time to time, so that's always fun. We also create our own jobs and in how we do these jobs. Fit is important, but so is the labour market and autonomy if you get any.
 

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Law. Particularly criminal law. Am aiming for prosecutor, which is very different in civil law. Unlike common law, in civil law the prosecutor is more like a chief of police.
 
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