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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. What are your views on nationalism?
2. Are you nationalistic?
3. Do you identify with the cultural identity of your country?
4. Which country do you come from?
5. Are you a minority in that country?
6. If you are a minority that is not indigenous to the region (i.e. African American, English-American, [email protected] American, Chinese-English), do you identify with the culture(s) of your diaspora group(s), the culture of the dominant group in the nation you currently live in, or the culture(s) of the country(ies) your predecessors came from?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. Skewed negative.

2. See above.

3. What cultural identity? I don't like McDonald's food, so: no, probably not.

4. See above.

5. No.

6. N/A
For precisely this reason, I was thinking of prefacing this with "no white men from the US" because I'm pretty sure that every American white male is going to answer like this. :p
 

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For precisely this reason, I was thinking of prefacing this with "no white men from the US" because I'm pretty sure that every American white male is going to answer like this. :p
Wait a second, my views are part of a majority?

In that case:

1. Skewed positive

2. Yes

3. Certainly. Er, hamburgers are cool.

4. U.S.A.!!!11

5. Yes. I'm ... um ... German ... and some other stuff ... very unique ...

6. Certainly. Er, bratwurst is cool.

*cultur'd*
 

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1. Skewed negative.
2. No.
3. Be more specific. I identify with the cultural identity of my nation (I'm a Quaker and everything) but I hardly identify with the cultural identity of my country. This will help you understand what I mean.
4. My nation is what Woodward (cf link above) calls the "Midlands". I think of it more as "Keystone" since it makes more sense in a historic context -- and the state it originates from is called the "Keystone State", for good reason. In terms of country, I'm still in the USA, of course.
5. No.
6. I actually find myself relating to Far Eastern norms a bit (like Zen Buddhism and all that stuff).
 

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1. Particularly detestable

2. Only in the vaguest terms(IE: I was born here, there's a vague attachment to people here)

3. Not really, I don't fit good in the ''pensée unique'' that prevails here.

4. Canada, QC.

5. Not in the terms in which you're speaking of.

6. ---
 

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1. Extreme nationalism is negative, otherwise I'm cool with it.
2. Not particularly, although I actually feel its harder for an american to be nationalistic because the US is comprised of so many sub-cultures.
3. What even is the american national identity? I like baseball, I like beer, I hate nascar and country music though, and fast food is gross. Hmm..
4. 'Murica
5. No.
6. I'm not a minority, but my mothers side is Italian and I identify with that about as equally as I identify with being an american.
 

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1. Indifference

2. No.

3. Tricky question. I'm going to assume that the cultural identity of my country is that culture sustained by the majority of those in the country I live in. And so I'll say no.

4. South Africa, Southern Africa.

5. Yes

6. Am a minority that is not indigenous to the region. Then again the majority of people in the country I live in aren't indigenous either. Concerning my identification with my own and other cultures... not sure how to answer that.
 

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1. What are your views on nationalism?
2. Are you nationalistic?
3. Do you identify with the cultural identity of your country?
4. Which country do you come from?
5. Are you a minority in that country?
6. If you are a minority that is not indigenous to the region (i.e. African American, English-American, [email protected] American, Chinese-English), do you identify with the culture(s) of your diaspora group(s), the culture of the dominant group in the nation you currently live in, or the culture(s) of the country(ies) your predecessors came from?
1. In my opinion, nationalism an outdated mode of thinking. Humanity has uncovered our place in the universe, and Earth is both small and insignificant relative to the rest of the universe. We have the capacity to accelerate our understanding of the universe and accelerate our standards of living beyond things our ancestors would have never imagined. However, those unaware of what humanity has uncovered flounder in antiquated laws and tenets that are no longer the best course of action. Essentially, science has accelerated past what most people are willing to accept (and are perhaps overburdened by it), and that outdated style of thinking is holding humanity back. Don't get me wrong, nationalism may have been a great idea for the G.I. Generation, where ideals were drastically different. However, our knowledge has increased and therefore our mode of living must change in order to accommodate it. Nationalism is only a small fraction of humanity's outdated mindset.

2. No.
3. In a basic sense. Actions/certain interests yes. Language, of course. Style of thinking, no.
4. USA
5. No.
6. N/A
 

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I'm a white american male so I'm not doing your list... :)

Nationalism/Pride of any form has always really bothered me, for me it just doesn't make any sense. Especially school pride, being forced to sit through high school nationalism during assemblies really got to me. I don't know if all pride is bad... but I have yet to know of a good form of it.

I have found some of the culture that has influenced my families behavior and the way they think interesting, and there are fascinating stories when I look up histories associated with last names, but it all really comes down to a very interesting story.
 
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1. This would depend on the context. There are many definitions and interpreted meanings of the word. One definition, "advocacy of political independence for a particular country" - I think can be supported in some cases. I also see no problem with a peaceful sense of pride for your country or kinship with a group, as long it doesn't involve extremism. Some people take it too far. Love for one thing ≠ hate for another. I think it's possible for peaceful nationalism to exist, but it would require people to let go of competitive mentalities towards other nations and feelings of superiority. A healthy bit of nationalism can be beneficial for preserving cultures, traditions, languages, etc.

2. In what sense of the word? Do I feel patriotic? I am happy to be able to live here.

3. I've lived in two countries. I currently live in US, and I'm not entirely sure what the cultural identity is here. For the most part, it seems to be a melting pot. In the country I was born, I am so removed from the culture that I don't associate with it that much.

4. Lithuania

5. In some sense yes.

6. hmm...I don't know. I don't really 'identify' with any culture. I just..exist.
 

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1. What are your views on nationalism?
Seeing as I am from Canada, I don't really have many examples of Nationalism to base a view of it on. That being said, in it's most basic form(love and/or respect of one's nation, whether ancestral or citizen of) is fairly normal and commendable. One should always respect that which they come from, as it plays a large part in their identity.

2. Are you nationalistic?
See above. I don't live in a country that has a majority ancestral identity, so it's hard to find any true Nationalist ideologies here.

3. Do you identify with the cultural identity of your country?
It doesn't really have one.

4. Which country do you come from?

Canada. Western Canada, to be more specific.

5. Are you a minority in that country?

Mediterranean/white male. So no.

6. If you are a minority that is not indigenous to the region (i.e. African American, English-American, [email protected] American, Chinese-English), do you identify with the culture(s) of your diaspora group(s), the culture of the dominant group in the nation you currently live in, or the culture(s) of the country(ies) your predecessors came from?
N/A
 

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1. You can like your country, if you have good reason to.

2. I'll stand behind my people, most of the time.

3. Depends on which country you're talking about.

4. Sapmi, but the 'real' country is Sweden

5. Very much so. 60k out of 9.6 mil.

6. N/A
 

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1. I wanted to say nationalism isn't too bad but actually it's most often 'used' by people for idiotic means with fairly tribal mindsets.

2. Yes but would never do anything unjust or immoral on behalf of my nation.

3. Yes.

4. The U.K.

5. No.

6. I'm actually from a region of the UK called Yorkshire. Or, more generally, I'm from the north. In the south of the country I don't feel at home at all and am very proud of being a northerner. I don't watch much Game of Thrones, but afters seeing one episode yesterday... I can say I much more strongly identify with those north of the wall. It's nowhere near as snowy, but we all certainly talk like they do. There's definitely a strong sense of identity here.
 

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1. What are your views on nationalism?
2. Are you nationalistic?
3. Do you identify with the cultural identity of your country?
4. Which country do you come from?
5. Are you a minority in that country?
6. If you are a minority that is not indigenous to the region (i.e. African American, English-American, [email protected] American, Chinese-English), do you identify with the culture(s) of your diaspora group(s), the culture of the dominant group in the nation you currently live in, or the culture(s) of the country(ies) your predecessors came from?
1. I don't really "get" nationalism. Having pride in where you're born, determined by political boundaries, sounds stupid to me. I kind of think nationalistic people are a bit selfish since they want all individuals to commit to the greater blob of people/society and I just don't care to ever do that.

2. I'm not nationalistic.

3. What IS cultural identity? I don't really know xD I don't think the countries I've lived in have much of a cultural identity since they are both very large and are "melting pot" type countries that are very diverse in this aspect.

4. Born in Russian far east, currently living in the US ((Pacific Northwest)).

5. Minority in both, I guess. I am a mix of several different ethnic groups. At most, I am 1/8th actual ethnic Russian but I may not even be that much ((I have a complex family history)). I'm also mixed with Japanese, Prussian/Ukrainian ((speculated)), some Siberian peoples you've probably never heard of and random north/central Asian groups...? This mixture gives me a very "FUCK RACE" attitude since it is so ambiguous and meaningless for me lol.

6. I don't know what my minority group is even called. "Asian"?! My "culture" at home is very random and mixed of too many things... and it's hard to relate it to any culture of people I've met. The "Russian" culture my family celebrates doesn't seem to be the same as what you find online for things like what a Russian Christmas celebration is like, and the Japanese side is from a very specific tradition that I can't find much about online ((everything is a verbal culture)). I'm very disconnected from my Siberian side since I never got to know those relatives. Regardless, I'm pretty sure whatever "culture" I have is something horribly unique thanks to a messed up and complex family history that I'm not even sure how to explain xD My family seems insistent on passing down... whatever traditions we have, though, lol. Friends who have visited me over the years have commented on how "lucky" I am to have a diverse culture and all of these weird traditions I get to do, which surprised me since as a kid, I assumed EVERYONE had a mixed culture in their families since that is what made sense to me. There's so many people in the world and countless cultures... I didn't understand how anyone could end up with two parents who had the same culture, so everyone should have mixed households xD I didn't realize how much of an oddity I was until I was a teenager. My family isn't rich in money but they seem wealthy in culture. Lately, I've been appreciating this a lot since it makes me feel very individualistic and unique, I guess? xD None of the standards applied to people who are purebred races or from standard "cultures" get to apply to me as there is no "stereotype" for what I am. I can do whatever I want because I don't have boundaries of these "labels" that people of more definite "races" and nationalities have to deal with. Also, the parts of these huge countries I've lived in are the parts nobody ever thinks about ((when people refer to "Russians" they usually think of those from the Moscow area, and when people refer to "Americans" they often are mainly referring to people in New York and other east coast cities. I'm not associated with either of those :V)). I think it's a background can really fuel INTP-ness in me.

I rambled and got distracted. What was the original question again?
 

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1. Depends on the kind of nationalism.
Ethnic/racial nationalism? Definitely bad.
Cultural nationalism? Usually good.
Integral nationalism? Not necessarily bad, even if it's almost always portrayed that way by PC media.
Civic/liberal nationalism? Usually good
... etc., etc.
2. In a way, yes.
3. Yes and No. I identify more with the cultural identity my country had before it was subjected to Christianization.
4. Sweden.
5. No.
6. N/A
 

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I think from what some people are saying, they are confused about the definition of pride, so I will include it in case anyone cares:

Pride

1. a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one's own achievements, the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated, or from qualities or possessions that are widely admired.

2.a group of lions forming a social unit.


So you see pride is about perceiving accomplishment, and it's often overzealous and unnecessary, for whatever reason someone or some group decides to sway the masses in such a way.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've put all of my responses to #1 at the top and assorted other answers at the bottom.
1. In my opinion, nationalism an outdated mode of thinking. Humanity has uncovered our place in the universe, and Earth is both small and insignificant relative to the rest of the universe. We have the capacity to accelerate our understanding of the universe and accelerate our standards of living beyond things our ancestors would have never imagined. However, those unaware of what humanity has uncovered flounder in antiquated laws and tenets that are no longer the best course of action. Essentially, science has accelerated past what most people are willing to accept (and are perhaps overburdened by it), and that outdated style of thinking is holding humanity back. Don't get me wrong, nationalism may have been a great idea for the G.I. Generation, where ideals were drastically different. However, our knowledge has increased and therefore our mode of living must change in order to accommodate it. Nationalism is only a small fraction of humanity's outdated mindset.
1. I wanted to say nationalism isn't too bad but actually it's most often 'used' by people for idiotic means with fairly tribal mindsets.
1. This would depend on the context. There are many definitions and interpreted meanings of the word. One definition, "advocacy of political independence for a particular country" - I think can be supported in some cases. I also see no problem with a peaceful sense of pride for your country or kinship with a group, as long it doesn't involve extremism. Some people take it too far. Love for one thing ≠ hate for another. I think it's possible for peaceful nationalism to exist, but it would require people to let go of competitive mentalities towards other nations and feelings of superiority. A healthy bit of nationalism can be beneficial for preserving cultures, traditions, languages, etc.
1. I don't really "get" nationalism. Having pride in where you're born, determined by political boundaries, sounds stupid to me. I kind of think nationalistic people are a bit selfish since they want all individuals to commit to the greater blob of people/society and I just don't care to ever do that.
Hmm, I agree most with Lunai's response.
Nationalism in the US is generally "US vs. THEM" mentality and isn't really helpful for anything other than being scared (see: Communism and the US' overthrows in Guatemala, Iran, and Vietnam. The CIA was convinced that there were communists in Guatemala and Iran just because they had a communist party (with no real power or influence and they only had like two seats in the house for Guatemala or sth) and because the Guatemalan's nationalism wanted to take control over their own land, but US fruit companies said "noooo I want to keep my land there". So we put a dictatorship there and ended up killing thousands of people as a result. The fruit company went out of business too anyway.)
People from "western" countries tend to think of nationalism in other countries as extremism (esp. when people start killing other people and there's all of these dictators and shit), but we also kind of made it that way by interfering with everything and fucking everything up. So now everyone else in the world hates us for interfering with their political systems.
Nationalism can be healthy, but the way the US has made people hate the US is really quite counter-productive.

I'm Korean, and there's like this collective consciousness among Koreans about the occupation of Korea by Japan. Like I guess it's this shared history? I think it's made worse by the fact that Japan refuses to apologize most of the time. I think they did..once? but yeah they deny that they did anything wrong which is just shitty. Even Germany apologized for the Holocaust and they've made measures to make things right. That doesn't make what they did better/worse, but Japan could at least apologize, ugh.

6. I'm actually from a region of the UK called Yorkshire. Or, more generally, I'm from the north. In the south of the country I don't feel at home at all and am very proud of being a northerner. I don't watch much Game of Thrones, but afters seeing one episode yesterday... I can say I much more strongly identify with those north of the wall. It's nowhere near as snowy, but we all certainly talk like they do. There's definitely a strong sense of identity here.
Cool! Yeah, hmm, being from the Pacific Northwest (Seattle specifically), I don't feel at all at home on the East Coast of the US. Although that's a long ways away, probably ten times the distance than Yorkshire to London. ^^;
Hmm, are northerners generally more conservative/liberal than southerners?
(Although Seattleites are distinctly different from western Washington state, where apparently they're more Republican, but Seattle and its suburban areas has 2/3 of the population of the state, so it always ends up with loads of Democrats.)

3. What IS cultural identity? I don't really know xD I don't think the countries I've lived in have much of a cultural identity since they are both very large and are "melting pot" type countries that are very diverse in this aspect.
3. I've lived in two countries. I currently live in US, and I'm not entirely sure what the cultural identity is here. For the most part, it seems to be a melting pot. In the country I was born, I am so removed from the culture that I don't associate with it that much.
Hmm, I disagree with the statement that the US is a "melting pot" due to the fact that African-Americans are thought of as criminals (Trayvon Martin, for example, and the Stop and Frisk thing). As a Korean-American, I'm either considered "model minority" (which means I've assimilated and I'm no longer "Asian" and denied my identity as Korean) or I could be a FOB (which is to say that I'm "Asian" and I haven't assimilated...but I'm not...because I was born here.) [email protected] Americans are thought of by most people I know (ie. white Americans) as undocumented workers who will do heavy work or clean the house for cheap.

6. I don't know what my minority group is even called. "Asian"?! My "culture" at home is very random and mixed of too many things... and it's hard to relate it to any culture of people I've met. The "Russian" culture my family celebrates doesn't seem to be the same as what you find online for things like what a Russian Christmas celebration is like, and the Japanese side is from a very specific tradition that I can't find much about online ((everything is a verbal culture)). I'm very disconnected from my Siberian side since I never got to know those relatives. Regardless, I'm pretty sure whatever "culture" I have is something horribly unique thanks to a messed up and complex family history that I'm not even sure how to explain xD My family seems insistent on passing down... whatever traditions we have, though, lol. Friends who have visited me over the years have commented on how "lucky" I am to have a diverse culture and all of these weird traditions I get to do, which surprised me since as a kid, I assumed EVERYONE had a mixed culture in their families since that is what made sense to me. There's so many people in the world and countless cultures... I didn't understand how anyone could end up with two parents who had the same culture, so everyone should have mixed households xD I didn't realize how much of an oddity I was until I was a teenager. My family isn't rich in money but they seem wealthy in culture. Lately, I've been appreciating this a lot since it makes me feel very individualistic and unique, I guess? xD None of the standards applied to people who are purebred races or from standard "cultures" get to apply to me as there is no "stereotype" for what I am. I can do whatever I want because I don't have boundaries of these "labels" that people of more definite "races" and nationalities have to deal with. Also, the parts of these huge countries I've lived in are the parts nobody ever thinks about ((when people refer to "Russians" they usually think of those from the Moscow area, and when people refer to "Americans" they often are mainly referring to people in New York and other east coast cities. I'm not associated with either of those :V)). I think it's a background can really fuel INTP-ness in me.

I rambled and got distracted. What was the original question again?
Oh, that's interesting! Siberians are a total minority in the Asia part of Russia; their numbers have gone way down. They're the only ones indigenous to the region, as the ethnic Russians actually took over Siberia, so I guess the Russian Christmas that you celebrate is mixed in with Siberia's style? I dunno. ^^; I've only had two cultures (Korean and...American/Christian I guess).

I forget what the question too was but reading your story about your multicultural family was neat! :tongue:
 

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1. What are your views on nationalism?
Taking credit for other people's work.
2. Are you nationalistic?
No. Its kind of hard when your country has no real identity.
3. Do you identify with the cultural identity of your country?
Not really. It just seems like a bunch of superficial nonsense. Lots of saying what we aren't.
4. Which country do you come from?
Canada
5. Are you a minority in that country?
No/yes. It's not like my actual ethnic group is the most numerous but because "white" is apparently a thing I suppose that I am in the majority.
6. If you are a minority that is not indigenous to the region (i.e. African American, English-American, [email protected] American, Chinese-English), do you identify with the culture(s) of your diaspora group(s), the culture of the dominant group in the nation you currently live in, or the culture(s) of the country(ies) your predecessors came from?
Neither. I would like to see where my family comes from but it's not that important to me. I like the landscape of Canada but as far as the people and culture is concerned it's a bit of a joke. At least in my immediate area (it's a big place).
 
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