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Discussion Starter #1
I'm honestly curious about this. It seems as though many INTP's have a lot of trouble with public speaking. I watch a fair amount of MBTI related videos on youtube, and it seems to me, that a lot of INTP's just can't articulate their thoughts. I don't blame them for this, it seems to be a stereotype for the INTP stereotype. (Que inception joke) So my question is, this stereotype realistic, or is this just part of the INTP condition that I've managed to avoid?

Are Any of you good with impromptu speaking or good story tellers? Once you've thought out what you're going to say does it not sound like verbal diarrhea? I don't mean to boast or anything, I've just always had this stuff come naturally. Even in the videos, there are times when the people talking really do catch me, but it tends to be few and far between.

Anyways, I'm just curious as to whether or not most INTP's are tongue tied, or if I'm actually in the majority here having a bit of a silver tongue. I know INTP's tend to pick up on foreign languages and their pronunciations easily. So I know speaking doesn't totally escape us. I also wonder if music helps. Please let me know if you're a musician or not when you comment.

Thanks for your time and I appreciate any responses.
 

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I can't speak for all INTPs out there, but personally I find it easy to speak about something I am very passionate about or interested in (in most cases). Otherwise I tend to stutter a lot and need to rehearse what I am going to say in my mind before speaking.
 

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I'm mostly okay with public speaking (as long as I've had enough time to prepare) and I was involved in theater. And I did make Moot Court when I was a law student because I made the Best Oralist Finals in Appellate Advocacy (which is where we get to pretend to be an appellate attorney, which is one part knowing the case and the law and another part improvisational theater; except in real life, appellate judges aren't impressed by theatrics.

As it goes, I'm more comfortable making speeches, doing theater and arguing in court then I am walking up to someone and talking to them. I know it sounds weird, but it's totally true.
 

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Have you been to one of these thing? Toastmasters International - Home

If you do happen to go, you start to realize that fluency, speaking skills, and leadership often has little do with personality type. I think confidence and self-esteem plays a much bigger role than your personality type.

There is a distinction to be made here though. Yes, ESTJ's/ENTJ's often like to lead, and ESFJ's/ENFJ's like to rally/control others, but that doesn't make them good at what they do. Why they end up becoming good is because they put themselves in positions that exercise and develop those skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm mostly okay with public speaking (as long as I've had enough time to prepare) and I was involved in theater. And I did make Moot Court when I was a law student because I made the Best Oralist Finals in Appellate Advocacy (which is where we get to pretend to be an appellate attorney, which is one part knowing the case and the law and another part improvisational theater; except in real life, appellate judges aren't impressed by theatrics.

As it goes, I'm more comfortable making speeches, doing theater and arguing in court then I am walking up to someone and talking to them. I know it sounds weird, but it's totally true.
That's interesting, I feel much the same way. My father is a phenomenal public speaker, and an attorney in his own right is a horrible conversationalist. He's perhaps the most reserved ISTJ I know. Put him in a court room or on a podium, and he suddenly becomes the life of the room. I am the same way when I perform. So I thin you may have a point with that. I think it could also expand beyond INTP's.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Have you been to one of these thing? Toastmasters International - Home

If you do happen to go, you start to realize that fluency, speaking skills, and leadership often has little do with personality type. I think confidence and self-esteem plays a much bigger role than your personality type.

There is a distinction to be made here though. Yes, ESTJ's/ENTJ's often like to lead, and ESFJ's/ENFJ's like to rally/control others, but that doesn't make them good at what they do. Why they end up becoming good is because they put themselves in positions that exercise and develop those skills.
I can see that being true. I'll look into that website.
 

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I'm better at arguing, providing argumentations as the debate goes on, than at giving a whole talk by myself. I wouldn't feel motivated anyway, I'm prone to think I won't be understood properly, or that people aren't interested in the point of view I eventually hold. It depends in the interlocutor I guess, plus the relevance of the topic.
 

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I have been told that I have very good public speaking skills, although I'm a classic INTP. My ExTJ mother forced me into it when i was a child, but this helped to increase my confidence. Now being an INTP I don't care what others think of me, so I am able to speak in front of crowds, or train large groups of adults. Children is another story. Don't have the extraversion to do it for a sustained period of time!

When I look back over different events in my life, I can see where I failed and succeeded simply because of my basic preferences and inability to function/work around too many people.
I used to work in a job that needed constant contact with people for 9 years, but I learned to work with the support of a small team, which kept me in my natural introverted state. However when I did my PhD in a lab full of 30 people, and a very incestuous department of over 100, I had people overload and I found it difficult to cope.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
 

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I have trouble with nerves sometimes and occasionally I get caught talking in circles in public (which sometimes makes me stumble on my words a bit), but this is rather rare. For the most part, I'm able to find the essential point that I must communicate. The key for me is to give myself a bit of pause and not try to talk as fast as I'm thinking. My way of understanding things involves making a lot of non-linear connections between principles and such. If I try to attack it head on and just explain everything, I get overwhelmed and I have simply too much ground to cover in too many directions. If I give myself a moment, I can find the essential connection, the key around which everything revolves. Speaking slowly gives my brain time to keep up with what I want to say.

As for improv/whatever, I'm fairly good at spontaneous acting. Not really a problem. I have a very expressive and contortable face and I'm good with impressions. And as of which I've been taking notice lately, my wit is actually rather quick, which comes in handy. The hardest part of impromptu speaking is the occasionally tongue-twister and the nerves that come beforehand. That's why sometimes it's better to have no preparation at all, because it doesn't give me time to get afraid.
 

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Speaking for myself, I'm not an engaging public speaker at all. I don't have a lot of fluctuation in my tone of voice, even when I "try" to sound more extroverted. I had to take a public speaking class in college, and luckily my professor graded everyone on an improvement/individual basis. I improved (and even got an A in the course), but there's no way I got to the point where it feels natural or comfortable.

With that said, my (self-proclaimed) INTP friend is quite good at it because he's a natural story teller. He does it for his job sometimes, so I suppose he had to learn the ropes.
 

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I'm not sure how others would rate my public speaking skills, but I have no problem with it. I may dread it, but that's usually because I didn't finish the powerpoint/poster/etc. for the presentation or slept for 10 hours the night before instead of practicing, but there is nothing about public speaking that I find inherently ​unappealing
 

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People are often suprised that I am actually quite an effective public speaker. In most situations I am very quiet, shy and act as a detached observer.

However, when I am required to speak to an audience, I am able to act confidently, speak assertively and express my ideas very succinctly. I feel genuinely excited to share my thoughts with others, and pleased when I feel that others have absorbed what I have said or learnt something new.

My hypothesis on this is that public speaking fulfills my inferior Fe. I am able to interact with many, many people, without all the subtle social nuances and queues that drains me heavily when interacting with people one-on-one. I get the best of the both worlds - I can satisfy my Fe by teaching and interacting with others, but still remain somewhat detached from them.

But I do feel that it is mostly an act, one that I can only partake in for short bursts. After speaking I feel quite drained, but pretty pleased. I guess the main thing that helps me is that sense of detachment - I am the speaker, and they are the audience.

The same thing occurs for me during job interviews and debating - I find it easier knowing that I am simply playing a role.
 

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I'm perfectly happy to sing in front of others since singing comes naturally to me and it's one of the things I love most plus people compliment me on it. In middle school the bullying didn't stop till after I started allowing my classmates to hear me sing and that helped end my depression. I'm a little nervous onstage if I'm doing a solo (which I've done a few times), but it's mostly the blinding light bothering me and I ignore the staring humans in favor of the song.

I'm great at speaking to a class if I'm seated and actually extremely vocal with no need to practice before hand. I really got into a debate in my World History class and won it without needing practice because it was something that gets me fired up. If I'm not seated or am in a fake trial in a classroom it doesn't go so well at all because I'm scared out of my wits (well, last time we did a mock trial everyone was nervous up there because the guy doing the questioning was intimidating).
 

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I happen to be quite adept at public speaking, particularly if I am interested in and/or passionate about the subject, but anyways... I am praised often for my public speaking skills despite barely being able to initiate conversation with strangers. Now of course I could never have one of those speaking personas similar to that of the stereotypical "salesman" nor do I want to. I believe I do well in debating as well.
 

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I don't think it's odd and most people think I'm good at it. It's a lot simpler than trying to convince someone to buy a product in sales or what have you. Cause it's more focused (introvert) and one sided. Just the tiniest grasp of Fe and you should be fine.

The improv sounds Ne-ish so it wouldn't be odd for a well-balanced INTP to be good at that. I'm not as good at doing that in person, though I'd say I'm a pretty good comedy writer when I've got time to structure it and present in a way that has more impact.
 

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We're good at it inside our heads in theory. I had to catch myself from leaving the schizoid response. "I'm actually pretty good at public speaking and improv people tend to be really surprised." I haven't done any presentations in a few years.
 

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Good topic. I have found I really bomb my practice talks but can effectively give a presentation. During practice talks I can't help but think, "they know all this already, what's the point." During an actual presentation, I am more enthusiastic and do a lot better.

My plan of attack is 1) Spend a decent amount of time preparing good slides (little text, more figures). 2) Think about the flow and the points I need to hit each slide). 3) Review. 4) Talk.

I don't like the idea of planning word-for-word. People that do that tend to give really boring talks. I try more to engage with the audience and use more improv. Doesn't hurt if you can throw in a joke or two somewhere either, but they have to work, haha.
 

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No, I'm pretty shit at improving unless I've thought about it before. Just like off the cuff, Ima make you laugh kind of shit, I am good at that, but have been declining in recent years since I've found less pleasure in being around people.

Mostly, there are two strategies. Go slow and force yourself to get to the essence, and use your voice to communicate to yourself and the other person that you're drilling down to what is both sufficient and necessary.

Or, get sucked into the conversation so that those random thoughts in your head that have nothing to do with what's going on, simply aren't there. This is less of a type thing, I think. We need a lot of stimulation these days.
 

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This is more of a nurture thing than nature. Introverts are less likely to put themselves in situations early on where they will develop public speaking skills. Those who were exposed to it somehow, eg singing, debate, theatre etc usually end up more comfortable with it.
 
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