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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just stumbled across this description of introverted feeling and wanted to see what some of you had to say on the subject.


The introvert of feeling-type finds support and guidance by shaping his own feeling-attitudes in accordance with an inner ideal. Here the activities of feeling are hidden, and from the outside there is, as a rule, little to tell us that we are dealing with a person of feeling-type. Feeling aims more especially at an inner harmony, trying to discover what under various circumstances should be the right relationships between people if life is to be beautiful and well balanced. Reality, however, reveals in most cases that this ideal is not attained, and introverted feeling is particularly vulnerable in regard to such experiences. This vulnerability — which may become as intense at that of the sensitive plant — is one of the most characteristic peculiarities of this type.

Just as with the introvert of thinking-type, we find here, too, a marked contrast between inner security on the one hand, and uncertainty in external behavior on the other. But whereas with the
introverted thinker this opposition gives rise to thought concerning the problems of life, with the individual of feeling-type it leads to deep feeling, and to a strange mixture of inner tenderness and passionate conviction. These people are absolutely certain as to the soundness of their ideals, but this is accompanied by a helpless feeling that it will never be possible to realize them in this world. They do not, however, reject the world, for feeling means the making of ties and is directed towards social contacts. In spite of ever-repeated collisions with the world and with other people, they can never give up their wish to love them both.

They conceal their sensitiveness behind a mask, which may be childish or simple, or again conventional, remote, or it may be friendly. But behind this mask the search goes on for someone who will understand, and for a community which will embody their ideals. However disappointed they are, they still in their innermost being believe implicitly in what their feelings tell them. Even if they are not able to express it clearly in words, they are inwardly quite certain as to what accords with them and what does not. Outwardly, their feelings are not very obvious, for when these are affected, these people tend to withdraw into themselves, and if they do express anything, it will only be much later, after they have had time to work it all over within themselves.

In ordinary life their mask conceals what they really are. But there is, nevertheless, something very individual about them, sometimes remarkably so, which will come to expression particularly in certain moments, in relation to certain people. This happens more especially in two situations: when they achieve real contact with another person; and when, in a state of high emotional excitement, they stand up for a threatened ideal.

In the first case, a very profound relationship of mutual understanding may suddenly come into being, all the wealth of their minds being unlocked to the confidant; sometimes this contact will later be broken off just as suddenly and unexpectedly, in defence of their own vulnerability. And where his feelings are aroused, the person who appeared to be so impersonal, remote and somewhat insignificant may suddenly burst out with a personal point of view, expressed with such conviction and such force of
feeling that it compels respect.

Such people may also resist with extreme obstinacy anything that does not accord with their sentiments. This resistance may be justified, in so far as it is based on a motive of fine
feeling; but the means used to give it emphatic expression is ill-suited to the external world, and in this respect incorrect. The consequence is that they are nearly always misunderstood, and they tend more or less to resign themselves to this situation. This contrast between a clear intention, directed towards harmony, and uncertain modes of expression, giving rise to misunderstandings, is found again and again in the lives of these people.

In childhood they are gentle and dreamy, and somewhat reserved, but with occasional violent outbursts of emotion. In familiar surroundings they can be unrestrainedly gay; but more often they are likely to exhibit violent resentment if circumstances do not correspond to their feelings, and it then seems to them that harshness and indifference prevail in the world. As a result, they seem to show signs of disappointment at a very early age, and a certain distrust of life. Owing to their inability to express themselves clearly, and to bring their ideals to reality, there may arise a
feeling of impotence and inferiority. They are apt to seek the fault in themselves, and may suffer much from a sense of guilt on this account. Here, also, feelings have a tendency to extend their influence, with the result that their whole being may be plunged into depths of unhappiness; but at other times a genuine emotional contact with someone will once more fill them with a quiet and enormous delight. Now they will look at the world again with new eyes, and a feeling that is almost religious will embrace both nature and man.

Later, also, the happiness of these people will depend on the emotional attachments which they are able to make, though they find it less necessary than do extraverts of this type to be in immediate touch with other people. The expression of other people's feelings in poetry and music, and the realization, through the reading of stories and biographies, of the depths of their spiritual experience, may have the effect on these people of making them feel more at home in the world. In this way, there develops in them a life of the spirit, which is carefully concealed from strangers, and which may be expressed, for instance, in a secret piety, or in poetical forms, which are revealed only with great unwillingness.

This
feeling-type is particularly found among women. Whereas the woman of extraverted feeling-type has it in her to create an atmosphere of harmony around herself, in the introverted woman of this type all the riches of her mind will be developed into a love which is inwardly directed towards the highest ideals of harmony. Without saying or doing much, such a woman will emanate a feeling of rest and security. It is difficult to describe an influence of this kind, expressed as it is in such indefinite forms. But on the immediate environment it may be very effective. A mother of this type may have an even greater influence on her children than the devoted and radiant mother of extraverted feeling-type. These women are often able to implant and foster something of their own ideals in their children, exercising in this way a quiet force which helps to keep a respect for moral authority alive in the world.

All the modes of expression for the deeper impulses of the spirit in religion and art find great support in such people. Whether they are artists or scientists, they are still primarily attracted by problems of the emotional life. They express themselves in such occupations with great care and precision. Here again the persistence and devotion of the individual of
feeling-type become evident. When they do give form to their inner feeling — in a poem, for example — they will carefully weigh every expression; at the same time, they will often neglect generally accepted social forms, which for them have no significance; or they will employ conventional and simple forms as a mask, from behind which a more genuine and finer feeling

Although in these persons the will, under the direction of strong moral conviction, represents an important factor in the psyche, it is less evident than in the other rational types, owing to the fact that the controlling activity is directed more inwards, and
will occasionally come quite unexpectedly to light. feeling is expressed more indirectly. It is most evident in the strong sense of duty characteristic of these people, and in their faithful discharge of their duties. Their activity frequently suffers as a result of moods of discouragement. When this is so, they lose themselves in pessimistic feelings, giving up their efforts to make themselves better understood, or to alter things in their environment. After a time they recover from such moods, since they tend, as a rule, to regard them as a fault in themselves.

This contact with their own moral judgment represents an essential factor in the lives of
feeling-introverts. They are not bound by the judgments of others — as is the feeling-extravert — for the standard by which they judge their own behavior is an inner moral law, intuitively felt to be binding. While the extravert of feeling-type will repress, for the sake of harmony, things both in himself and in the external world which do not accord with his ideal, the feeling-introvert will remain more aware of such conflicts. In him, however, the limiting and excluding activity of the demand for harmony may be detrimental in a different way, everything not consonant with that harmony being regarded from a negative point of view, as opposed to what is ideal and good. It is impossible for these people to see the world or themselves objectively, and their continual comparison of things with ideal requirements gives them an exaggeratedly critical point of view. Since this also applies to their own lives, there is an undermining of their own self-confidence, as well as of their confidence in the world, which may seriously affect their happiness in life. It is necessary for these people to recognize that things which do not exactly accord with their ideals may yet have a value which may be developed.

In these cases, also, the instinctual life is to a very large extent subordinated to the regulating force of
feeling. Since the relationship between moral conviction and instinctual impulse is here worked out more within the mind, there is less danger of pretence for the sake of the external world than with extraverts. Instinctual feelings are subordinated to the ideal. At the same time, there may be a too forcible suppression of the instinctual life, in which case it will lead not so much to a split in the emotional life as to a certain joylessness, and to the feeling that life is passing without bringing any true fulfilment. There is too often a need to associate all pleasures and joys with some moral value, and to condemn them if this higher satisfaction is not obviously found in them.

Intuition is also subjected to the authority of
introverted feeling. Intuitions here bear more on the inner aspect of feeling than on its expression in other people. They may give form to the laws of feeling, but in images rather than in concepts. Where intuition is developed, it is of great assistance in finding expression for introverted feeling, both in practical life and in art. Intuition may also provide a link with religious life, which, in this case, will be specially developed in its feeling-aspect: inner moral unity with God and with his fellow-man has greater significance for the man of feeling-type than ecstatic experiences or philosophical problems. The dominance of feeling is revealed in the constant search for a harmonious relation and in the weight given to views on morality, love and justice.

Thought is, as a rule, not very essential in the lives of these people. They accept the thought-forms as taught to them, and make conscientious use of them; butthis is not vital to them, as the judgment of
feeling is. In their thought-processes, they argue from preconceived attitudes of feeling, and frequently do not embark on any logical thinking at all, leaving the realm of logic to others to deal with.

Dr. J. H. van der Hoop, Lecturer in Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Conscious Orientation

 

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I like this.. It is the common ground (in N-types) between ENFPs, INFPs and INTJs.. The ENTJ has it also, but in terms of ordering, it goes; INFP, ENFP, INTJ.. I respect this function for its powerful capacity to detect the sincerity of another, when combined with intuition.. It is almost like a lie-detecting function, but it is capable of appreciating numerous - more subtle - cues.. Thanks Psilo.
 

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Would you mind sharing where you feel the differences lie? Or any other isfp that would like to add insight?
Maybe there is no real difference; it's more in the style of presentation. It is difficult to explain, since feelings are tough to explain. But I'd define it less in terms of ideals, and more in terms of appreciation and ambiance. In this description, there is an emphasis on relations between people, but I would also include my relationship to my surroundings and my environment. I also would be less likely to see a spiritual dimension here, although I sometimes feel traces of that.

To me, this is the feeling of being pleased with and appreciating my environment and the people around me and working towards that. It takes the feel of a vibe, or a mood, and has the sense of being "in the zone", or "not in the zone" if things aren't working out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for the post Sidewinder.

I would also venture to say that most descriptions of feeling focus too much on the people aspect. Certainly that is a tendancy, but it is also incomplete. Feelings can be people oriented, but also object oriented, situational, emotional etc.

So se gathers feelings from immediate surroundigs while ne gathers it from inferences made from the surroundings. Primarily anyway. That's what I'm getting from this.
 

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MOTM Jan 2010
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I don't know about other INTPs, but I know that this is my least developed function (according to a cognitive processes test I took). Intersting read.
 

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Thanks Psilo. I came to think of some things from my own life:

- Because of Fi other people can see ISFP:s as "dreamy" or "living on a different planet", "living in his own world". I've heard this many times about myself, and I feel kind of misunderstood, because I dont think I live in "another world". I'm very present in reality and the physical environment, but more on the sensuos side than the social.

- Fi is also described as finding underlying truth and coherence. This is very important for me to know, because it caused me great confusion at the university. I could be a good and original student who sometimes said smart things, and came up with good ideas. But I was never able to sustain it for longer times. I was going for the truth without intuition. Very draining. I lost my interest, forgot everything I'd just heard and left the library for a coffee instead.

- Kind of the same as being here. I dont know if I am that interested in psychology. It's a way to give Fi some food and get some excitement, play and fun, from it also. But I dont think it's a genuine interest for me.

So if you are an INFP maybe you can get at least something out of these remarks, because they are from the perspective of "INFP-minus-N" so it might help you to isolate your experience of Fi, if you know what I mean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
From Jung's Personality Types

The Introverted Feeling Type

It is principally among women that I have found the priority of introverted feeling. The proverb 'Still waters run deep' is very true of such women. That are mostly silent, inaccessible, and hard to understand; often they hide behind a childish or banal mask, and not infrequently their temperament is melancholic. They neither shine nor reveal themselves. Since they submit the control of their lives to their subjectively orientated feeling, their true motives generally remain concealed. Their outward demeanor is harmonious and inconspicuous; they reveal a delightful repose, a sympathetic parallelism, which has no desire to affect others either to impress, influence, or change them in any way. Should this outer side be somewhat emphasized, a suspicion of neglectfulness and coldness may easily obtrude itself, which not seldom increases to a real indifference for the comfort and well-being of others. One distinctly feels the movement of feeling away from the object. With the normal type, however, such an event only occurs when the object has in some way too strong an effect. The harmonious feeling atmosphere rules only so long as the object moves upon its own way with a moderate feeling intensity ans makes no attempt to cross the other's path. There is little effort to accompany the real emotions of the object, which tend to be damped and rebuffed, or to put it more aptly, are 'cooled off' by a negative feeling judgment. Although one may find a constant readiness for a peaceful and harmonious companionship, the unfamiliar object is shown no touch of amiability, no gleam of responding warmth, but is met by a manner of apparent indifference or repelling coldness.

One may even be made to feel the superfluousness of one's own existence. In the presence of something that might carry one away or arouse enthusiasm, this type observes a benevolent neutrality, tempered with an occasional trace of superiority and criticism that soon takes the wind out of the sails of a sensitive object. But a stormy emotion will be brusquely rejected with murderous coldness, unless it happens to catch the subject from the side of the unconscious, ie unless, through the animation of some primordial image, feeling is, as it were, taken captive. In which event such a woman simply feels a momentary laming, invariable producing, in due course, a still more violent resistance, which reaches the object in his most vulnerable spot. The relation to the object is, as far as possible, kept in a secure and tranquil middle state of feeling, where passion and its intemperateness are resolutely proscribed. Expression of feeling, therefore, remains niggardly and, when once aware of it at all, the object has a permanent sense of his undervaluation. Such, however, is not always the case, since very often the deficit remains unconscious; whereupon the unconscious feeling claims gradually produce symptoms which compel a more serious attention.

A superficial judgment might well be betrayed by a rather cold and reserved demeanor, into denying all feeling to this type. Such a view, however, would be quite false; the truth is, her feelings are intensive rather than extensive. They develop into the depth. Whereas, for instance, an extensive feeling of sympathy can express itself in both word and deed at the right place, thus quickly ridding itself of its impression, an intensive sympathy, because shut off from every means of expression, gains a passionate depth that embraces the misery of a world and is simply benumbered. It may possibly make an extravagant irruption, leading to some staggering act of an almost heroic character, to which, however, neither the object nor the subject can find a right relation. To the outer world, or to the blind eyes of an extravert, this sympathy looks like coldness, for it does nothing visibly, and an extraverted consciousness is unable to believe in invisible forces.

Such a misunderstanding is a characteristic occurrence in the life of this type, and is commonly registered as a most weighty argument against any deeper feeling relation with the object. But the underlying, real object of this feeling is only dimly divined by the normal type. It may possibly express its aim and content in a concealed religiously anxiously shielded, from profane eyes, or in intimate poetic forms equally safeguarded from surprise; not without a secret ambition to bring about some superiority over the object by such means. Women often express much of it in their children, letting their passionateness flow secretly into them.

Although in the normal type, the tendency, above alluded to, to overpower or coerce the object once openly and visibly with the thing secretly felt, rarely plays a disturbing role, and never leads to a serious attempt in this direction, some trace of it, nonetheless, leaks through into the personal effect upon the object, in the form of a domineering influence often difficult to define. It is sensed as a sort of stifling or oppressive feeling which holds the immediate circle under a spell. It gives a woman of this type a certain mysterious power that may prove terribly fascinating to the extraverted man, for it touches his unconscious. This power is derived from the deeply felt, unconscious images; consciousness, however, readily refers it to the ego, whereupon the influence becomes debased into personal tyranny. But, wherever the unconscious subject is identified with the ego, the mysterious power of the intensive feeling is also transformed into banal and arrogant ambition, vanity, and petty tyranny. This produces a type of woman most regrettably distinguished by her unscrupulous ambition and mischievous cruelty. But this change in the picture leads also to neurosis.

So long as the ego feels itself housed, as it were, beneath the heights of the unconscious subject, and feeling reveals something higher and mightier than the ego, the type is normal. The unconscious thinking is certainly archaic, yet its reductions may prove extremely helpful in compensating the occasional inclinations to exalt the ego into the subject. But, whenever this does take place by dint of complete suppression of the unconscious reductive thinking-products, the unconscious thinking goes over into opposition and becomes projected into objects. Whereupon the now egocentric subject comes to feel the power and importance of te depreciated object. Consciousness begins to feel 'what others think'. Naturally, others are thinking, all sorts of baseness, scheming evil, and contriving all sorts of plots, secrey intrigues, etc. To prevent this, the subject must also begin to carry out preventative intrigues, to suspect and sound others, to make subtle combinations. Assailed by rumors, he must make convulsive efforts to convert, if possible, a threatened inferiority into a superiority. Innumerable secret rivalries develop, and in these embittered struggles not only will no base or evil means be disdained, but even virtues will be misused and tampered with in order to play the trump card. Such a development must lead to exhaustion. The form of neurosis is neurasthenic rather than hysterical; in the case of women we often find severe collateral physical states, as for instance anaemia and its sequelae.
 

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Where does it come from? I'd like to read the extraverted feeling description for comparison if there is one. I've never been able to work out which I am.
 

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Cafe Legend and MOTM Jan 2011
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I'd like to read something like this on introverted thinking, because some descriptions make it hard ty distinguish between the two introverted judging functions.
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Where does it come from? I'd like to read the extraverted feeling description for comparison if there is one. I've never been able to work out which I am.
I have just posted the chapter on extraverted feeling. :happy:

I'd like to read something like this on introverted thinking, because some descriptions make it hard ty distinguish between the two introverted judging functions.
Coming soon...

Edit: Found it online and it saved me the time of typing it up. Posted in NT forum.
 

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In the first case, a very profound relationship of mutual understanding may suddenly come into being, all the wealth of their minds being unlocked to the confidant; sometimes this contact will later be broken off just as suddenly and unexpectedly, in defense of their own vulnerability.
Have any INFP's had this experience, of opening up to a confidant, and then suddenly and unexpectedly breaking off contact? I recently had an INFP friend open up to me in a profound way, and reading this kind of thing makes me nervous...if any INFP's can help talk me out of my tree, or give me a dose of reality, I would appreciate it.
 

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Have any INFP's had this experience, of opening up to a confidant, and then suddenly and unexpectedly breaking off contact? I recently had an INFP friend open up to me in a profound way, and reading this kind of thing makes me nervous...if any INFP's can help talk me out of my tree, or give me a dose of reality, I would appreciate it.
<.<

I recently broke off all contact with a friend who I was completely open with. She's an INFP too but she wouldn't be open with me much at all...

The only reason I broke off contact and feel very alienated about it now is because I wasn't, and still aren't sure if the friend likes me much. If I knew that she did, then I would never had stopped talking to her. So I suppose that we're all terrified of opening up to people who may not trust or like us (Even if they've told us that they do!), thus to prevent us from dropping a relationship, we have to know that we matter to someone.


Urgh, I hope that makes sense. I only just woke up :blushed:
 

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- Fi is also described as finding underlying truth and coherence. This is very important for me to know, because it caused me great confusion at the university. I could be a good and original student who sometimes said smart things, and came up with good ideas. But I was never able to sustain it for longer times. I was going for the truth without intuition. Very draining. I lost my interest, forgot everything I'd just heard and left the library for a coffee instead.

So if you are an INFP maybe you can get at least something out of these remarks, because they are from the perspective of "INFP-minus-N" so it might help you to isolate your experience of Fi, if you know what I mean.

Do you find that when you get ideas and try to explain them too? Your have them, and verbalise them - maybe start off with something small, and the flood gates open, and you kind've...channel intuition, like this great vat of power that lights up a sort've expanding mindmap, making you gesticulate wildly, and talk so intensely animatedly, but when you've stopped speaking it's all gone...? You feel the connections, and the ideas, and it's a wonderful, all consuming feeling, which takes over and makes you sort've spazz about. But it's hard to access...

I'm starting to wonder if I'm an ISFP...

Hmm, I do find it both draining and energising, people describe it as an 'energy', tell me I'm going 'too fast', but when I stop mid flow I can't find my way back very easily at all, and always have to move about in some way to get ideas going again.

Does this resonate at all, or am I totally off the mark?
 

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I have just posted the chapter on extraverted feeling. :happy:

Coming soon...

Edit: Found it online and it saved me the time of typing it up. Posted in NT forum.

is there one for Ni as well?

I really appreciate the lengthy descriptions.

... he he... we are putting you to work!
:)
 
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