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not the other way around?

I am an intuitive according to most tests. In the past I liked to some do things like driving my car fast in city traffic and playing fps games on a very high level.

This made me feel very well. I guess it was the total focused required that did it. Then I didn't know much about MBTI but now I know more.

I guess what I was doing was temporarily switching to sensing mode. Intuition is great but perhaps it doesn't really cut it when total focus and split second reaction times are required.

So if I'm right it would seem some intuitives can switch to sensing mode... But can sensors switch to intuitive mode? I'm not sure but how should they do it?

What do you think about this? Can intuitives also function as sensors when it's required, but can sensors do the opposite?
 

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The reason why MBTI results change is because we emphasize different functions in different situations differently. In that sense it is not a "fixed" type but it indicates your preferences at any given moment. Some other type categorizations might describe more permanent tendencies but even those are subject to change, as a big part of jungian typology involves various dynamics.

I don't follow your reasoning as to why it would apply only to intuitives.
 

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An Intuitive is someone who prefers Intuition over Sensing; the term doesn't refer to someone who never uses Sensing, so your switching modes model is unnecessary. The idea that everyone uses both Intuition and Sensing is already part of Myers-Briggs theory.

whoops, this is the cognitive functions forum, not Myers-Briggs. I'm not sure the terms "Intuitive" and "sensor" even apply to cognitive functions theory.
 

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It's a fictional example, but noir detectives that talk about their gut are sensors with an occasionally intruding intuition.
You may have triggered a film noir marathon weekend for me. I absolutely love that trope (and that genre).
 

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You may have triggered a film noir marathon weekend for me. I absolutely love that trope (and that genre).
For fiction, it's surprisingly realistic, if plot convenient. Backstory's usually a young cop or criminal mook (In organized crime, it's basically the same thing.) with good observational and analytic instincts. By the time someone walks into their office, they're a seasoned private dick, steeped in exposure to illicit patterns, so their intuition's become developed, at least within their potentially unfortunate specialization.

They (occasionally) get to do what we NJs do all the time, NOT be able to NOT "see" what's really happening or about to ...instead of sleeping or remembering to eat (except at 2 am) or semi-mindlessly going fishing/drinking. Can't even bonus-bang the femme fatale client like a (probably contextually safe) little tool since you just know she's another bad guy, maybe even the true/victorious big bad, so is probably the fake ingenue victim, who might even be more dangerous.:unsure:
 

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For fiction, it's surprisingly realistic, if plot convenient. Backstory's usually a young cop or criminal mook (In organized crime, it's basically the same thing.) with good observational and analytic instincts. By the time someone walks into their office, they're a seasoned private dick, steeped in exposure to illicit patterns, so their intuition's become developed, at least within their potentially unfortunate specialization.

They (occasionally) get to do what we NJs do all the time, NOT be able to NOT "see" what's really happening or about to ...instead of sleeping or remembering to eat (except at 2 am) or semi-mindlessly going fishing/drinking. Can't even bonus-bang the femme fatale client like a (probably contextually safe) little tool since you just know she's another bad guy, maybe even the true/victorious big bad, so is probably the fake ingenue victim, who might even be more dangerous.:unsure:
Gut instincts are the domain of the irrational functions, not intuition. An STJ that follows their gut instinct is most probably relying on Si; the NTJ Ni.

Working off gut instinct is not uncommon among sensing types, it's just done with different functions.

Whether an intuitive type (or sensing type) does this "all the time" or not is dependent on whether they lead with an irrational or rational function. If rational, they will utilize their leading irrational as more of a helping hand.

Essentially, INFJs and INTJs will run more on gut instincts because their leading function is irrational (introverted). The ENTJ would use their Ni, but less consistently and efficiently as either Ni leading type.

The same way ESTJs can use Si, but they're not going to use it as well as an ISTJ.
 

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An Intuitive is someone who prefers Intuition over Sensing; the term doesn't refer to someone who never uses Sensing, so your switching modes model is unnecessary. The idea that everyone uses both Intuition and Sensing is already part of Myers-Briggs theory.

whoops, this is the cognitive functions forum, not Myers-Briggs. I'm not sure the terms "Intuitive" and "sensor" even apply to cognitive functions theory.
This explains the OP's question well. It's a matter of preference, not have/have not.
 
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Intuition focuses on patterns, and sensing focuses on the things that make up the pattern. If you look at how people operate, it is clear that everyone uses both. The difference comes in which does an individual focus on, which do they feel more comfortable and at ease using.
 
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