Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,689 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've always been the type to fail all my classes. Despite this, I am extremely smart... Like scary smart. Trust me. I've been told I was going to make a difference in this world because of how scared people are when they approach me they instantly see how smart I am. Knowing this, why wouldn't I decide to finally take the long-awaited IQ test? After weeks of preparation I was disappointed to find out that I scored a 72... That's right, me? Can you believe it? ME a 72?! Ridiculous. Now my first thought was, well, maybe I am not that smart... But I dismissed this ridiculous idea immediately. It isn't smart to live in fantasyland. Then I finally came up with a conclusion that will blow your minds
Anyways now to the bulk of this post. IQ tests are truly, truly false. I can prove this by being a contradiction. I mean I sat at the back of class in high school and didnt pay attention and still managed to graduate high school! Not many people can say the same. Its quite funny really, how the IQ test pretends to be a valid criteria when evaluating one's intelligence. I managed to pass my first course in college with a C+, thus disproving the myth of the IQ test. Oh how I pity those in mensa, truly misguided individuals... truly!
Anyone with similar stories? How did you disprove the IQ test?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,332 Posts
I got 132 last time, making me more intelligent than 97 % of the population supposedly, but that's not right. Once at my uncle's sheep farm, I got outsmarted by a male when I tried to lure it back into its grid. I can't be that smart. If I was, my life would've been a lot easier than it is.
 

·
EvilShoutyRudolph
Joined
·
5,099 Posts
When I was in fifth grade, my brother Alex started correcting my homework. This would not have been weird, except that he was in kindergarten—and autistic. His disorder, characterized by repetitive behaviors and difficulty with social interactions and communication, made it hard for him to listen to his teachers. He was often kicked out of class for not being able to sit for more than a few seconds at a time. Even now, almost 15 years later, he can still barely scratch out his name. But he could look at my page of neatly written words or math problems and pick out which ones were wrong.
When I was in fifth grade, my brother Alex started correcting my homework. This would not have been weird, except that he was in kindergarten—and autistic. His disorder, characterized by repetitive behaviors and difficulty with social interactions and communication, made it hard for him to listen to his teachers. He was often kicked out of class for not being able to sit for more than a few seconds at a time. Even now, almost 15 years later, he can still barely scratch out his name. But he could look at my page of neatly written words or math problems and pick out which ones were wrong.
Many researchers are starting to rethink how much we really know about autistic people and their abilities. These researchers are coming to the conclusion that we might be underestimating what they are capable of contributing to society. Autism is a spectrum disease with two very different ends. At one extreme are “high functioning” people who often hold jobs and keep friends and can get along well in the world. At the other, "low functioning" side are people who cannot operate on their own. Many of them are diagnosed with mental retardation and have to be kept under constant care. But these diagnoses focus on what autistic people cannot do. Now a growing number of scientists are turning that around to look at what autistic people are good at.
Researchers have long considered the majority of those affected by autism to be mentally retarded. Although the numbers cited vary, they generally fall between 70 to 80 percent of the affected population. But when Meredyth Edelson, a researcher at Willamette University, went looking for the source of those statistics, she was surprised that she could not find anything conclusive. Many of the conclusions were based on intelligence tests that tend to overestimate disability in autistic people. "Our knowledge is based on pretty bad data," she says.


This hidden potential was recently acknowledged by Laurent Mottron, a psychiatrist at the University of Montreal. In an article in the November 3 issue of Nature, he recounts his own experience working with high-functioning autistic people in his lab, which showed him the power of the autistic brain rather than its limitations. Mottron concludes that perhaps autism is not really a disease at all—that it is perhaps just a different way of looking at the world that should be celebrated rather than viewed as pathology.
Having grown up with two autistic brothers—Alex, four years younger than I, and Decker, who is eight years younger—Mottron's conclusion rings true. As I watched them move through the public schools, it became very clear that there was a big difference between what teachers expected of them and what they could do. Of course, their autism hindered them in some ways—which often made school difficult— yet it also seemed to give them fresh and useful ways of seeing the world—which often don't show up in the standard intelligence tests.
That is because testing for intelligence in autistic people is hard. The average person can sit down and take a verbally administered, timed test without too many problems. But for an autistic person with limited language capability, who might be easily distracted by sensory information, this task is very hard. The most commonly administered intelligence test, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) almost seems designed to flunk an autistic person: it is a completely verbal, timed test that relies heavily on cultural and social knowledge. It asks questions like "What is the thing to do if you find an envelope in the street that is sealed, addressed and has a new stamp on it?" and "What is the thing to do when you cut your finger?"

This year Decker was kicked out of a test much like WISC. Every three years, as he moves through the public school system, his progress is re-evaluated as a part of his Individualized Education Plan—a set of guidelines designed to help people with disabilities reach their educational goal.


This year, as part of the test, the woman delivering the questions asked him, "You find out someone is getting married. What is an appropriate question to ask them?"
My brother's answer: "What kind of cake are you having?"
The proctor shook her head. No, she said, that's not a correct answer. Try again. He furrowed his brow in the way we have all learned to be wary of—it is the face that happens before he starts to shut down—and said, "I don't have another question. That's what I would ask." And that was that. He would not provide her another question, and she would not move on without one. He failed that question and never finished the test.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-hidden-potential-of-autistic-kids/

I personally doubt the accuracy of IQ tests. There are too many varieties of them, each one with their own different rules and outlines. Not to forget the amount of psychologists out there, who happen to be against IQ tests.

An IQ test can only measure your spatial awareness, patterning, and language skills, but nothing else. But intelligence is a spectrum.

Even Steven Hawking doesn't take IQ seriously, so why should we? The only time IQ tests should be taken seriously, is for if someone scores within the mental retardation zone. Besides that, I don't really know why people are taking it that seriously.
 

·
EvilShoutyRudolph
Joined
·
5,099 Posts
@Marshy14, is it me, or has your posting style changed to match the new avatar? I'm not complaining.
This avatar is a mystery to me. Is it happy, sad, or mad! Or is it just constipated!!!! Tell me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,444 Posts
I have the same problem except with my sense of humour. I'm so funny, and yet, no one pays me for it. It's how people show me how much they value my act. It's priceless.

So I pity those rich comedians. They have only their bank balance and the exact decibels of applause to cling to, while I have infinity.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
I've also been questioning the validity of a lot of things lately. Like, relationships are a lie; do not, I repeat, do not trust them. I'm the sexiest person I know. I've always sat at the back of my class just so that others won't get distracted by my sexy back, or shoulders, or wings, or my booty, you know. I hide myself so much from girls just so I won't fuck up their life by giving them self-esteem issues but each time they find me, and tell me I'm an ugly asshole who doesn't shower for days and stinks 24/7. I understand their frustration at seeing someone so impossibly sexy but that's no way to go about dealing with it. This is reaction-formation at its best, or worst. That's why I've never been in a relationship. Me?! Can you believe it?! It's seriously unbelievable but so many things that are real are unfortunately unbelievable. Like the fact that girls are insecure pitiful beings who can't handle a real man.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,731 Posts
I have the same problem except with my sense of humour. I'm so funny, and yet, no one pays me for it. It's how people show me how much they value my act. It's priceless.

So I pity those rich comedians. They have only their bank balance and the exact decibels of applause to cling to, while I have infinity.
Circles are infinite, any starting/stopping point imposed on them are completely arbitrary. Do you ever find yourself coming full circle and people aren't entirely sure whether you're quite serious or expounding from a higher plane of humor?
 

·
Not a Robot
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
Circles are infinite, any starting/stopping point imposed on them are completely arbitrary. Do you ever find yourself coming full circle and people aren't entirely sure whether you're quite serious or expounding from a higher plane of humor?
This is my experience. It's so lonely up here.
 

·
EvilShoutyRudolph
Joined
·
5,099 Posts
I think it's actually shooting laser beams out its eyes.
*gasp
That us all I can say. That, and what I just said, and what I also just said, and what just said, after I said that and that and that.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,428 Posts
An IQ test can only measure your spatial awareness, patterning, and language skills, but nothing else. But intelligence is a spectrum.
Wrong. IQ tests also measure processing speed, memory, and probably other things I can't remember at the moment. What is it with all you random, clueless internet people who think your half-baked concepts of intelligence are superior to whatever is tested on real IQ tests?

Even Steven Hawking doesn't take IQ seriously, so why should we?
Oh stop with your bullshit appeal to bogus authority.

Also, large differences in IQ subtest scores suggest learning disabilities, so scores in the cognitively disabled range are not the only reason to take IQ tests seriously.
 

·
EvilShoutyRudolph
Joined
·
5,099 Posts
Wrong. IQ tests also measure processing speed, memory, and probably other things I can't remember at the moment. What is it with all you random, clueless internet people who think your half-baked concepts of intelligence are superior to whatever is tested on real IQ tests?


Oh stop with your bullshit appeal to bogus authority.

Also, large differences in IQ subtest scores suggest learning disabilities, so scores in the cognitively disabled range are not the only reason to take IQ tests seriously.
Aw, is someone triggered? Also, you do know that there are many variations of intelligence right? You must love making yourself look close minded, right?

People are entitled too their opinions.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,444 Posts
Wrong. IQ tests also measure processing speed, memory, and probably other things I can't remember at the moment. What is it with all you random, clueless internet people who think your half-baked concepts of intelligence are superior to whatever is tested on real IQ tests?


Oh stop with your bullshit appeal to bogus authority.

Also, large differences in IQ subtest scores suggest learning disabilities, so scores in the cognitively disabled range are not the only reason to take IQ tests seriously.
Out of curiosity, what would be involved in "taking an IQ test seriously?" For adults, I mean. Gifted children probably need special programming, as do learning disabled children, but with only a few exceptions, we're all adults here. So what, exactly, should we do to take our IQ tests seriously if we have them?

In the end, I'm pretty sure all @Clivy is saying is that IQ tests can't quantify everything. For example, a sense of irony.
 

·
EvilShoutyRudolph
Joined
·
5,099 Posts
Out of curiosity, what would be involved in "taking an IQ test seriously?" For adults, I mean. Gifted children probably need special programming, as do learning disabled children, but with only a few exceptions, we're all adults here. So what, exactly, should we do to take our IQ tests seriously if we have them?

In the end, I'm pretty sure all @Clivy is saying is that IQ tests can't quantify everything. For example, a sense of irony.
Yup. At least someone had an enough of an "IQ" to comprehend something that simple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,203 Posts
IQ tests (and their proxies) don't measure everything important about a person, but what they do measure corresponds highly to life outcomes in a modern society.
As with most measures of human ability, there is as much or more value in looking at average rather than individual scores. For example, a public policy that works well for a 100 iq population might not be such a good idea when applied to an 85 iq population. And vice versa.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top