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Whenever I hear these words, it gives me a sense of peace because to me they imply precise, incisive thought. However, whenever I hear people around me refer/react to these words, I get the feeling they're not popular. Typically, it is assumed that if you're critical you will find fault with something or someone: criticism seems to be commonspeak for b*tching :)

So, I was wondering if this was one of those Thinker-Feeler differences.
 

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'critical' - yes it does feel negative to me, even though I know that in essence it's not a negative word. It implies to me a negative look at whatever is being discussed. However, 'criticism' and 'critique', no those aren't negative. You can do a criticism of a piece of work that is mostly positive, after all. However, before I went to university and began using those words in the university context I did view them negatively because people did tend to use them to mean finding fault. Critique was always less so but it still had that whiff of negativity.

I'm not sure it's a thinker/feeler difference so much as a 'precision with words' difference. I majored in English literature and so we were taught to use words very precisely, whereas some people in other subjects didn't care as much and I don't think the general person on the street is as obsessed with word meaning as I am. Your mention of 'precise, incisive thought' makes me think you're similar in liking things to be accurate so you're going to respond to those particular words in their true sense, and especially for 'critique' it will give off vibes of precision of thought.
 

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I do associate those words with a certain negativity. It's all about how one takes it. For those who take in the supposed 'right spirit', criticism is nothing but a suggestion to improve and therefore has positive connotations. For those who don't like being corrected or proved wrong, though, criticism is generally received with resentment.

Now that applies to criticism of a person and their actions. If we refer to an idea which has to be fine-tuned, however, I take it upon myself to find errors or inconsistencies in it. Then it takes upon the "precise, incisive thought" meaning that you suggest.
 

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If a person sees a word as negative or positive, then they are feeling from either likely or past experiences in which the word is used.

In this case it depends what they're criticizing and how they criticize it.

It's going to come across as negative if they're condescending when they make the criticism.

It could also come across as negative if they're criticizing something that you have no means of improving or evidently no aspirations to ever try and improve such.
 

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It's not a bad set of words but there are some who conflate criticism with tearing you a new one. For those people it's hard for them to take their own definition of it in kind.

Critical can also mean important, necessary. I think that should be remembered.
 

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Well, criticism can be good, but I do see it in a bit of a negative light... mainly because I wish I made no mistakes and am painfully aware of just how far away I am from that fantasy. ^^' So I start apologizing about my shortcomings before anybody even begins to criticize me. x3 Or I just listen to the criticism and take it just a bit too far and beat myself up about it. x_X

"Constructive" criticism makes me feel better because it sounds more, "Yes, you're not perfect at ____ yet, but with this helpful advice you can get closer to being good!"
 

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Well.. the important part is the reason of the criticism. If the motive is to help improving something, then there is no reason to take it negatively. On the other hand, criticism without reason, "complaining", serve no purpose, and is generally more hurtful than helpful.
There is also the way the criticism is presented. Very benign comments can be very badly received when presented a certain way.
Too often, I saw people offending others under the pretense to help, but the way the situation is handled is so awful that the subject of the criticism end up acting even worst than before. That kind of defeat the purpose of the criticism.
 

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I definitely like criticism and critique when they help me improve on something I'm trying to do. I tend to appreciate them less when they are trying to push me in a direction I'm not working towards, or a goal I don't agree with, unless the person can also offer sufficient argument as to why their propositions are valid.

I default to the meaning of "absolutely necessary" for the word "critical". Secondarily, "of the utmost importance". Neither of those is negative to me.

I consider myself a critic, in the sense that I tend to try to get to the truth of anything I care about, and that requires analysis and judgement.

I do not think judgement, in general, is a negative thing, just that judgement ought to be reached carefully, and expressed wisely.
 

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It depends. When it is from people who only see one side of the situation, and think that their opinion of what is best is the only valid choice, then I am repelled.

For instance, if someone suggests that I get plastic surgery because they think it would be an improvement on my looks, I am certainly not going to feel grateful to them.
 

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"Criticism" and "critique", as individual words without context, are neutral to me. I might associate "criticism" with a harsher, stricter tone, perhaps, but I wouldn't say it sounds negative to me. The same thing goes for "critical". I don't view the trait as necessarily bad, per se, but it does tend to link to other adjectives that hold some degree of negativity for the general populace.
 

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Criticism: Could be good or bad or neutral. The context and way the criticisms are worded matter.
Critical: Sounds negative overall, though I'm aware it can be used in different contexts.
Critique: Doesn't seem negative as it should be intended to help the person see and fix flaws. A good critique should be objective/unbiased as possible with the intent of being constructive.
 

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Not at all, it gives a window into the other side of the argument. I however do ignore nonsense criticism - do not even feel the need to pay any regards to such criticism properly. Kind of why I don't like arguing with SPs. Their aloof nature makes it hard for me to make them understand logic. Emotion and logic can not be applied together as they'd like it to be.
 

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Not at all, it gives a window into the other side of the argument. I however do ignore nonsense criticism - do not even feel the need to pay any regards to such criticism properly. Kind of why I don't like arguing with SPs. Their aloof nature makes it hard for me to make them understand logic. Emotion and logic can not be applied together as they'd like it to be.
eh, it can actually... just takes time is all my friend. :p

maybe you should get Fizz on here, she makes a fine balance between her rage and logic.
 

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Whenever I hear these words, it gives me a sense of peace because to me they imply precise, incisive thought. However, whenever I hear people around me refer/react to these words, I get the feeling they're not popular. Typically, it is assumed that if you're critical you will find fault with something or someone: criticism seems to be commonspeak for b*tching :)

So, I was wondering if this was one of those Thinker-Feeler differences.
I used to feel that way until I learned some is actually quite helpful and welcome it quite a lot now. It more on how it's done that gives it's negativity, which is something I need to work on espcially when stressed out and I can't hold back. I also agree criticue is a much better term.
 

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You usually get told you are doing something incorrectly. So yes. But it doesn't always mean that it's hurtful.
 
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