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I'm currently in my first job, which happens to be retail. I've been there 7 months doing a Recovery role; it only requires me to interact with customers every now and then, sometimes not at all. However, the other day I was put into a different role, generally referred to as Customer Service, and I was completely and utterly miserable. It was an 8 hour shift, and I was stressed and anxious and uncomfortable the entire time. The role genuinely frighted me. It drained me dry, and it's safe to say I did a very poor job at it. I was completely overwhelmed, to the point I had to leave the store for a breather, which was only a temporary relief. It was also apparent to my co-workers and customers that I was failing at this role.

I'm just wondering if Customer Service is one of the worst jobs to be in for an INFJ?
 

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I truly think it depends on the individual rather than type, but yes it can be hard for us infjs. I started in retail, moved to lab work, moved back to retail and tons of customer service working at an aquarium (I had to work as an elevator operator *gag*). One thing I do have to say is that it is incredibly draining to constantly be "on" for 8 hours in the public eye. I am very good at customer service as I can flip that switch, but I found myself as 2 different people, the friendly, bubbly, approachable front of house, and the crass, sarcastic, flippant back of the house. I feel your pain, people are idiots. And answering the same stupid questions over and over again is taxing to the point where it's hard to find any fulfillment in what you're doing. I've also learned that customer service comes easy if you're confident in what you're talking about and come to the realization that it's just a job to pay the bills, a temporary go-to, not a life's passion. I wish you the best of luck with it.
 

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Being "on" all the time would be draining for me too. I realized it just doesn't use my skills and actually harms them instead. I'm at my best when i have some "down time" too because that's when i process everything i heard and read and typically the most insightful ideas come then.

I think even my managers have realized that now. As one of them said: "Your brain is a black box to me, but as long as there are superb things coming out of it, i will leave you to whatever it is you do". I think he gave the essence of Ni without knowing it. :laughing:

If it's any consolation: i think human resources might be even worse
 

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I think there are so many other things to consider apart from your type and your preferences~ such as the quality of the environment and the flexibility given. I used to work in Costumer Service, myself. I was both nervous and excited at first but when the nerves went away and I became confident with the codes and the gist of things, I learned to really like working there. The people I get to work with were amazing people that I really had fun with and were always there for any help. The costumers varied, however, but I was lucky enough to never really encountered a nasty one. In fact, I made several friends along the way who would come very often, as well as getting a visit from people I know out of work. I didn't really find the job tiresome in the sense that it was repetitive, every costumer was different, products would come and go, and there was just always something to learn. Call me odd, but I might have secretly really liked the idea of getting promotions and tackling goals. I think most of all I enjoyed getting to work with, serving and meeting other people. While, like @Sheik, It felt like having 2 different faces... I don't think it was unnatural for me to the point that it becomes very draining.
 

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I worked customer service for a few years and loved it, but it depends greatly on other factors (namely environment and supervisor/coworkers). It was a toy store, and I really enjoyed helping people find just the right item for their child (not only was it helping people, which I always like, but it's also like solving a problem/doing a puzzle). I also liked learning about all of the merchandise (I take pride in knowing "trivia" and details like that), and being an "expert." But my coworkers and supervisor were really great, and the atmosphere was very friendly, casual, and supportive. No matter what the job is like, if the environment is uncomfortable, I will be unhappy.
 

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Personally, being required to interact constantly (and, no doubt, often superficially) with people for eight hours a day would be just about the worst thing I can imagine. I could perhaps handle that amount of interaction for very brief stretches. I much prefer to work alone, with minimum human interaction, toward a specific goal, and then to go home and forget all about it.
 

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I think it certainly depends on a lot of factors, but in general, I loathe customer service. You know that phrase most sales managers live by... the customer is always right? Well, they aren't. And I damn well am not going to pretend they are.

I find I have to put on a face, have to make sales under deadlines for things I don't believe in and am treated like a second to anyone who comes through the door, no matter what. I'm not saying to treat me as a superior- but at least equal. It's degrading (to me, at least) and I've never, ever enjoyed it.

It's also boring, non-creative, provides little to no autonomy and it money based.

No thank you.
 
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I would think so. Retail. I could never be a waiter. Being a cashier seems hard enough, but at least you only have to deal with people for a few minutes at a time. As a waiter/waitress, that person thinks they own you for an hour or so. I cannot believe the shit I see people complain about when I am out. They should be embarrassed.

I am not dealing with people like this all day:

Hair Hairstyle Blond Face Hair coloring
 

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Customer service is a somewhat ideal job for me as far as retail goes. I would rather not be apart of corporations or whatever, of course, but if I had to customer service would be the best place for me I think. I am accustomed to dealing with angry people, and I don't mind absorbing blows directed at the company I would be working for. It would let me use my people skills, which is honestly the hint I most enjoy exercising.
 

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Worked part-time as a waitress (so not quite customer service...) but I found that I actually quite liked it. Love interacting with people and being able to smile/make small talk without having to be personal, which I actually found not very exhausting because of how superficial and easy the interaction is? Hmm.
I strongly relate to this. I found I had a bizarre appreciation for my retail job because it gave me a social outlet with essentially zero risk involved. I love to interact with people, but the uncertainty of "genuine" social interaction with strangers I find unpleasant. At work, I have a scripted role to play and an air of authority and professionalism to retreat behind if needed. I get to study and observe people and even experiment with them in an entirely sterile environment.
 

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I waited tables part time for 10 years since 17 to support myself. I loved it. The dining experience is mostly positive for ppl (who would go out to eat when angry with each other?) therefore it's probably better suited for INFJs (aux Fe). At times I'd sense that someone wasn't happy or was wistful. I'd be extra attentive to the person, hoping that he/she would perk up. I always gave solo diners more time (unless I sensed that he/she wanted to be left alone). Ppl did feel that I wasn't just "doing my job" therefore I was usually the one with the most tips.


My current job I am on rotation twice a month to man the customers on the phone and in person for about 8 hours total. When ppl come or call, they have a problem (or problems) more often than just questions. It's inherently antagonistic. I was berated, yelled at, accused, and in general verbally abused often (the richer and more educated the worse the behavior). Some days I was baited into a volley (hormone's fault). Most of the time I can deal with them, knowing that they "need" my help. No matter how rude they are, they are mostly not connected enough politically (not buddy buddy with the Governor or Obama) to get me fired.


Going back to waitressing is what I may do after retiring. I'd love to work at a diner where there are many regulars. I'd call everyone honey or sweetheart and do my part to make someone's day. I can't change the world but I can put a smile on a person's face, one person at a time.


Dealing with public is draining. I was ON like an extrovert. I really did give my all. It's important if you have a job dealing with ppl to have downtime after work. If you go home and deal with a house full of ppl demanding your attention, it's a sure fire way to be a walking volcano, ready to explode.
 

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I've always enjoyed customer service work, and I still get to engage directly with people often enough for my own tastes now.

What is best in life? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oo9buo9Mtos No, Conan, it isn't that. It's being given the chance to try and help improve other people's experience of life. I think that is more to do with enneagram than type, perhaps, but it's the hand I'm holding in either case. Customer service involves being directly able to do that all day long, and that can be fantastic. Of course it can be draining, but you can get pleasure from feeling drained still, just taking the opportunity to properly recharge and reset appropriately. With the right situation, I think customer services can be fine for an INFJ.

Now sales: that's a job I couldn't personally stomach. All the insincerity and manipulation, just to sell whatever old tat the place I work at shifts - not for me.

:)

If customer service doesn't work for you, fair enough. But to answer the o/p's question: I personally don't think it's the worst role for an INFJ, no. Thanks for your time.
 

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I don't know, I detail clean machines in a forty degree factory during an eleven hour shift, and the only way I'll get actual help is if the person who is free to help actually likes me. I don't want to sound like a jerk or a whiner, but I feel like if I can adjust to that, then you can adjust to this certain job. :)
 

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I'm just wondering if Customer Service is one of the worst jobs to be in for an INFJ?
I have worked in several jobs that included me working Customer Service. They all drained me and left me feeling awful until I mastered/knew the answer to the questions that were regularly being asked of me. Basically, if I am thrown into a Customer Service situation and don't know the answers myself, it is the worst. But, once I feel confident about what I am doing, it actually feels really good to be able to help customers and solve problems, and I actually enjoy it a little bit. I still end up being drained at the end of the day, but I take delight in helping people so it becomes less troublesome over time and easier for me to recharge.
 

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I've had mostly hosting and retail jobs. I now think that customer service is just not for me.
It hasn't always been so bad though. There were a lot of different variables contributing to how much I enjoyed each job.
I was so extremely uncomfortable when I started having to talk to customers in retail! Different places expect different amounts of interaction. I don't like my job now because I am expected to be incredibly outgoing and persuasive with every customer (It's never-ending). I don't like feeling like I am being pushy with people. I can tell how uncomfortable it makes them, which makes me uncomfortable. Some corporations just don't care or consider that reality enough.
I feel really good at work sometimes. I've been there a few years now and know the products and procedures very well, so I don't dread being approached with a question or problem. It's rewarding knowing I can really help people.
But most of my interactions involve customers rejecting my suggestions, asking me really stupid questions (PLEASE LEARN TO READ SIGNS AND COUPONS BEFORE ASKING, PEOPLE), having me state or explain the same simple thing over and over and still not being listened to, and having customers complain to me about things beyond my control that are in no way my responsibility (ex: prices too high, they don't like our selection)
Retail is exhausting to me. I preferred working in restaurants. When people are coming to a business for a specific reason, it's a lot easiest to deal with them. Restaurants also give you some breaks from interaction so you don't have to be "on" for several hours straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have worked in several jobs that included me working Customer Service. They all drained me and left me feeling awful until I mastered/knew the answer to the questions that were regularly being asked of me. Basically, if I am thrown into a Customer Service situation and don't know the answers myself, it is the worst. But, once I feel confident about what I am doing, it actually feels really good to be able to help customers and solve problems, and I actually enjoy it a little bit. I still end up being drained at the end of the day, but I take delight in helping people so it becomes less troublesome over time and easier for me to recharge.
That's exactly why the day for me was so horrifying, because I was thrown into this role at last minute with no training. I've only been there 7 months, and that's only in one role, so there was still so much about the store I didn't know about. So, most of the time, when a customer would come up to me for help, I had no idea how to help them so I had to always walk off to find a co-worker. I went up to the store manager and supervisors so many times with questions, needing their help to help me help a customer...if that makes sense. It was just so frustrating, and I was stressed that I couldn't help the customers on my own. I even had a couple of customers annoyed at me because I didn't know the answers to their questions. It's a horrible feeling not being able to help someone when it's supposed to be your job to.
 

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I've been a waitress for several years, but I had never expected it to be a job that I'd ever see myself doing. At this point, I'm just on autopilot for the most part, though every now and then someone will strike up a conversation that snaps me back into the moment. Other than that it's just a succession of niceties that comes easy. I've mastered the skill of killing someone with kindness - it's my favourite thing to do with an unreasonably demanding or unhappy customer.
 

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I've been in a customer service position in an office for most of my working life, and haven't had too much of a problem with it. 85% of the job relates to emails, so there's enough of a distance between you and the 'end user' for it to be comfortable. There's some work on the telephone, which isn't too bad.

Worse part is anything 'face to face' - like exhibitions, personal visits where you have to meet a whole crowd of people. That's terribly draining!
 

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Short answer: Yes!
Long answer: YEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEES!

Really, I worked as a Warranty Support Technician for a computer company and all the talking on the phone and interacting with customers killed my spirit, and almost my relationship with my SO close to the breaking point.
 
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