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Discussion Starter #1
Surely, many INFPs must have tried this! I'm interested if it usually ends up in an INFP's fulfilment or in his/her disillusion?

Personal reason I ask: I am 31 years old and I have a "good" life, in that I have a good (but ultimately unfulfilling) job with nice people, a beautiful apartment in a beautiful and lively city, and there is nothing lacking in terms of material comforts or social opportunities (which I don't use :p).
Still I feel deeply unhappy and self-isolate, and all I want to do is quit and leave everything behind and move far away to the very remote countryside where I happen to own a small cabin on my family's land, to pursue nothing but a project I cannot stop thinking about but which also is a lot of work. Luckily, I am very self-disciplined in my work and I have come to enough savings to be able to pursue it for years, if I live very frugally.

On the one hand I really, really want to do it, but I am afraid that this might be a naive INFPs illusion and escape from reality and "real" people which is part of its appeal, I admit. For sure it would be really easy and tempting to self-isolate even more for years and live in my creative bubble surrounded by beautiful nature with no need whatsoever to face my social issues. But also, maybe, I might be able to create something of meaning and be able to proceed from there in a much more fulfilling direction.. and maybe this also helps with all other aspects of life and mental health.
Then again, I might fail and regret what I have given up.

I'm aware that no one can predict or decide this for me. But you are surely more knowledgable about our type than I am, and you have your own life experiences and thoughts. Is this a classical INFP mistake? Maybe anyone tried something similar before?
 

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It sounds like you are in a great position to have this option. I have considered it, without a doubt. At one time, just over 10 years ago I was considering chucking "the good life", and moving to a a remote outpost in an immense wilderness. Not a place where I'd be all alone for weeks, but there are these small communities in the area I was scoping out with populations of less than 50, living simply. The "rat race" would be left behind. I really may have done it too if I had not met my wife while toying with the idea. Since then we have left the big city, and moved to a more rural town where I work the same job via telecommute. Not the remote, edge of an adventurous wilderness I had once envisioned, but definitely feel more at home here. I've also made it clear the amount of time I'm willing to put into my job, along with my unwillingness to take over someday. This has allowed me to put some time into trying to develop a writing career, although, not as much time as I would wish for it to be moving quicker. There are definitely positives and negatives to the half measure I chose.

I'm fairly highly introverted, but I can say that after being pretty isolated for about 10 days I do crave to see other people, even if I don't interact much with them, just others being around. And that's with having my wife. Before marriage, I remember if I'd isolate for a while I'd want to get amongst people after about 3 days. So, have you taken a week off and spent the whole time in isolated cabin to see what it would be like? If so, you have an idea. I'd imagine at least once every 2-3 weeks you'd be heading to nearest town for supplies, be around somebody, etc.

The one thing is it sounds like it could be an adventure, and I know that's what I was looking for, a real adventure in my life. There's still part of me that wishes I'd done it, at least for a time. No regrets about my amazing wife and our life, just the day job thing is such a monotonous grind at times, and I want to experience living more hours of my week passionately. You're fairly young, you can always come back and reinsert yourself into society and something related to old career if you decide its not for you after all. Wish you well with it either way.
 

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i know this isn't typically INFP-ish thinking, but here it goes..
sure, your calculations tell you you have some years of comfort, but we know well how circumstances change. look at 2020 - who knows what will happen with economy and society in a couple of months, not to say years?

if you want true peace of the heart and mind, you have two options:
  • take the compromise and continue your regular life, with periods/sessions of retreating to your cabin and work. it's not a 100% involvement but it gives you both what you crave for and what is needed for long-term sustainability. you get to keep both lifestyles, but never really give 100% in.
  • if you want to completely remove yourself from society but also not end up penniless, you need to employ that savings, that money to continue to circulate and make more money. investing in stocks or businesses and such is the best way to keep earning and not just feeding on your savings down to zero someday. gotta find some way, create some type of income, profit - which is also work of it's own but will sustain you longer than just melting that pile of money you have.
that's basically the only two solutions i see for your situation..
i do support your high goal with that project, but you also gotta cover yourself existentially (financially)..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both for taking the time to respond!

Interestingly, your concerns encourage me, since I think I've got those covered well enough.

1. Isolation / GusWriter: Differently to what you had in mind, in my case my cabin is still very close to a village where among others my family lives (mother, father, sister) who I have good relationships with. Also, there is a train station in that village and within 40 minutes I can be in a major metropolis with an unlimited variety of people.

2. Money issues / 7r4m0n74n4 : I see where your concerns are coming from. Unfortunately, my savings are not even close to making enough money to live off by investing them. My investment would be in myself and my own business. Unlike what you probably had in mind, my project and "art" of choice is no breadless pursuit. To be more concrete: I work in video games. First I did study illustration and design, then I taught myself programming. I have been working as a video games programmer both self-employed and in a company for the past 5 years. By now, I feel experienced enough to create a solid and personally meaningful game completely by myself and though this still being a gamble (like every business), I think this is by far more likely to be profitable than f.e. painting, music, etc.

I'm sorry, I feel like having asked an unnecessary question.
The best course of action is probably to start my project while still employed as soon as possible (still have to finish contract work, right now), and make the leap once I have a clear feeling of it going somewhere.
 

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OK, so it is even something in your current field. Plus, you are not quite as isolated, even close to family. Also, if you eventually decide to go back to employee status somewhere you don't really have a gap in your resume. You were working on your own project. IMO, this is actually starting to sound like a no brainer, as long as you've worked out the funds will last you long enough to give you a shot at bringing your project to fruition.

Yeah, my isolated spot was different, a bit more remote and involved out of the country and out of a lot of comforts I often take for granted, but there was a potential for a frequent manual labor job that would help sustain the simple life I had planned there.
 
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