Personality Cafe banner

knowing MBTI and that you're an INFP...

  • liberates you!

    Votes: 32 60.4%
  • it depends (pls explain below)

    Votes: 19 35.8%
  • entraps you or self-limiting yourself!

    Votes: 2 3.8%

  • Total voters
    53
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Like for example:
now that you know which career you're more suited to, as an INFP,
would you feel much more liberated than before you know it, ie: because now you can certainly avoid jobs/careers or a certain lifestyle that you won't do no matter what,
OR,
would you feel (or lots of people told you) that you're like 'entrapped', or very 'rigid', by your "INFP" description?

for example: ever since I've known MBTI and that I'm an INFP (after 5x tests), my perspective and mindset got radically changed when viewing about Human's variations and 'why' certain people do this or that, etc.
However, here in my home country, there's probably still only like 1% or even perhaps less who know about MBTI (one of my ultimate goal/dream is to introduce this life-changing test to my home country),
and therefore, often times they would never able to understand why I never want to work using my Finance Degree, or to continue my family-business (factory), and only want to do/choose career that's related with either creativity or humanity (helping people, or the world), otherwise, I won't take it, no matter how "lucrative" or "REAL job" or "very BIG prospect".
This even unfortunately almost drives my parents and brother crazy and viewing me as too damn 'unflexible, rigid' because I kept rejecting those 'lucrative' jobs/career or the "safe, secure, NORMAL" jobs.
especially in my big-business-oriented traditional Chinese family value.

What do you think?
and if you do think it's also somewhat an 'entrapment', then how can we tackle this 'self-limiting' issue?
especially as we grow older and still haven't seem to 'settled down' on any kind of job yet!

thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
I think it's just reassuring. Being so rare a type and so starkly different from the masses is difficult. It helps if you know that you're not the only one, you're not some freak or mental patient (necessarily), and it's just your temperament that makes you different. I know that I don't have to pigeon hole myself. I mean, in mere existence, I break any given rules and spill out of any boxes you put me in.
 

·
(ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧
Joined
·
5,108 Posts
MBTI is ultimately limiting. No type fits me well, but I think INFP comes the closest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
For the most part it's been liberating. Never really felt like an entrapment. Sometimes it has felt irrelevant.
It's liberating because I have a different understanding of myself and the people around me. A lot of things have been put into a better perspective for me for the most part. Even with the bad, it never feels self limiting, just reassuring. As far as what's suited for me like careers and stuff that also doesn't feel like an entrapment. I'm still mostly gonna do what I want. That's when it seems irrelevant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,993 Posts
It's a comforting sort of liberation in some sense because all my life I had always felt and wondered if I was some kind of unknown freak *honestly*

However, I can see how limiting MBTI is and how people tend to form very limited generalizations because of it. (I'm not blaming MBTI, I'm thinking of the natural need for people to stereotype)

For example, when I read stereotypes like,''INFPs are unrealistic'' ''INFPs are always scared and awkward'', I think,'' fuck no.''

We can get scared and awkward, but not always :angry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
Learning more about MBTI has helped me understand both myself and other people better.

But I will never let it confine me. I do not really fit into any cubicle really well, I always find that there is something else that keeps setting me apart in any group I might try to fit in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
For me it's been both, but it really depends on what attitude you have towards it. At first it felt like an entrapment, because it was just so spot-on that my immediate attitude was "Oh, so I was meant to be this way. Great, I guess I just have to deal with it." After a while I began to see these things as challenges to overcome - paths to growth, balance, etc. It also gave me more confidence when interacting with others, because I'm more able to adapt to others' preferences, and more able to understand where they're coming from. I think I said this in another thread, but I'll say it again. MBTI doesn't put you into a box unless you allow it to.
 

·
(ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧
Joined
·
5,108 Posts
MBTI doesn't put you into a box unless you allow it to.
Some people gravitate toward the certainty presented by MBTI and cling to that desperately. I've found it to be a flawed system but it's sometimes useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
759 Posts
It has been extremely insightful and liberating.

On the other hand, I don't try to adapt myself just because of descriptions I read about INFPs on the internet. If some trait that is listed doesn't fit my personality that is not really a big deal to me. We're all different people with different life experiences and I think INFPs in general are pretty unique, so to think that all of us have the exact same traits would be silly.

Still, the overall description of INFP suits me just fine and I am definitely happy to know about it :happy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Ultimately, it's liberating to me. At first, I tried to make sense of it. But then I saw that everyone was different in here just as much as the different personality types. I never was good at trying to fit a mould. In addition, it seems that I have traits from all over the MBTI spectrum. And that's quite all right. It's also all right that it seems like the test put me here as a 'screw it, you're here until you figure out who you are or accept that you're unique.'

At first about three years ago, when I learned about it and took the test for the first time blind, it seemed very liberating knowing that it is all right to be different (with everything over 60% to the right). It's actually part of why I started asking for advice confidentially instead of giving in to problems. Only reason I'm questioning it now is because of a difference of situation. But my situation never changed because it was my life, so that was pointless doubt. But to stay on topic, yeah, it was liberating until I let it confine me. Now it's liberating knowing and understanding the truth! :happy:
 
  • Like
Reactions: cheezey

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I think initially discovering MBTI, and that I was an INFP, was something of a revelation for me. It felt so good to finally have some form of explanation for why I had always felt "different" to most other people, why certain things mattered more to me than other types etc. In that way it was certainly incredibly liberating, as if a huge weight had been lifted of my shoulders, I started to feel good about being different.

However I don't believe blindly in all of what is written about INFPs applies to me personally, but I can see how if you were to do so that it might lead you towards entrapment.

I think as long as you can keep an open mind to consider such things, before just believing in them outright, then it's never likely to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
It's made me feel less alienated and more human. Instead of feeling completely different to the people around me, I now feel like I'm just a different type of person. I think as an INFP you get told that although you are unique you are not entirely unique, which I think is true for humans in general. I find this to be liberating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I think it's just reassuring. Being so rare a type and so starkly different from the masses is difficult. It helps if you know that you're not the only one, you're not some freak or mental patient (necessarily), and it's just your temperament that makes you different. I know that I don't have to pigeon hole myself. I mean, in mere existence, I break any given rules and spill out of any boxes you put me in.
Exactly.
I'm not sure that it's exactly "liberating" or "entrapping". Nothing really changed when I found out that I was an INFP, except for the fact that I felt more okay with the way that I was (mainly, being incredibly introverted, really) -- so maybe, in that way it was liberating. I feel like a lot less of a freak for not being extremely outgoing or the "life of the party" type, because it's just not who I am or what I'm comfortable with. I'm more comfortable with myself, now.

...if that answers the original post at all?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
MBTI is nature and the rest is nurture. I believe that when you're nurtured properly and have the experiences you will have in life, the complete person will emerge. When INFP types aren't nurtured well, socialized well, we tend to display our shadow. But if you subscribe to MBTI, then you also subscribe to astrology and the Chinese Zodiac. All of which, in my opinion, effect our overall character, personality, and motivations.

The fact that most INFP's have very similar experiences testifies to the authenticity of these personalities. I don't feel that knowing your natural self is limiting; infact, it's very liberating and validating to know that as an INFP, I have wonderful qualities, such as empathy, compassion, remorse, the ability to have soo much love to give, the love of the arts, people even, knowledge, wanting to know a thing on a deeper and more profound level, and that I'm not a freak or crazy. I dont want to take over countries or step on people to achieve material gains. And I'm not saying that all other types are, but many extroverts do seem to have no qualms about it. But again, this, in my opinion, stem from nurture. We can create a better world with all types working for the betterment of humanity using all of our unique talents. Pipe Dream? Maybe. But I am a dreamer.

I don't want there to be a terminator kind of existence in this world. Psychopaths and narcissists are on the rise who lack everything we have soo much of, and tend to be extroverted types. Sometimes I wonder if it is intentional breeding through prenatal drugs, vaccinations, genetically engineered or modified foods, t.v., video games, fast food, and internet that are creating or intensifying these detached, narcissistic and psychopathic people (Pardon my rant). Btw, asbergers and autism are said to have similar characteristics to psychopathy. Maybe a stretch, but the aforementioned may be contributing factors. But, anyway, we (INFP's) do our own thing! Our intelligences are unique to each of us. No one personality,ethnicity, gender, religion, or sexuality could form humanity or civilizations or socities. Now think about the functions of all of these personalities. EMBRACE your nature and continue to be nurtured through your life experiences, and look forward to many possibilities. No one is useless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,835 Posts
it was good to know i'm not the only person like this. it isn't limiting at all , i relate to it about 65% ish and i relate to other INFPs more than i do most people
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
I think it very much goes both ways.

In the beginning, you are liberated, but slowly and unconsciously you begin conforming to your minds INFP stereotype. That's when it becomes an entrapment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
It's made me feel less alienated and more human. Instead of feeling completely different to the people around me, I now feel like I'm just a different type of person. I think as an INFP you get told that although you are unique you are not entirely unique, which I think is true for humans in general. I find this to be liberating.
Yeah that's what I felt too.

When I first took the test, I was pretty shocked to be honest. I had been "acting" as an INTP throughout the last couple years of high school, and being an INFP explains why I felt disconnected from my true self. Learning that I'm an INFP really helped me to dive deep into myself, and understand what I really want out of life, rather than just thinking that I do a bunch of weird things that don't really make sense. It's really made me feel more in tune with myself.
 

·
Registered
INFP 4w5 sp
Joined
·
5,258 Posts
Well, what I find is that I don't look to these things to tell me about myself, so much as in reading them I recognize things about myself. It's helpfull to have these things I've been aware of in a more scatterbrained way all defined and explained in relaitonship to other things. What makes it feel liberating is that it is soooo good to know that there are others like me and that my differences are seen - at least by some - as not 'wrong' just different, as valid alternatives to how many people have expected me to be. It's beautifull to know that these things that I like about myself are recognized and shared by others - even if I don't know them personally. I discovered this in Highschool or Junior High - can't remember which - and didn't really meet anyone else like me until college, but just knowing I was ok made a big difference in how I approached others. It gave me a little extra confidence to stand up for and believe in myself.

I don't just take a book or tests word for it about myself. I don't think I have tried to be more like this than I am, or accepted things about myself that it suggests which I don't feel are reallly me. I just use what I can see as applicable to myself and people I know, and it's been very enlightening and usefull.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
One of my best friends was the person who got me interested in the Meyers-Briggs personality tests. When I first started reading about my personality type (INFP) i was amazed at the fact that it fit me so well. It was like the books, the sites, the people, and myself personally all understood who I am at a base level.

On the other hand I will eat my hat if there are only 16 different types of people in this world. The types are excellent tools to help you understand yourself, others, and your relationship with others however, like Rowingineden said: You cannot pigeon hole yourself based on the generalities, albeit accurate generalities, of the 8 dichotomies.

My friend who introduced me to Myers-Briggs ended up getting way too into it and started making decisions in his life based on what he thought would be the right choice for his personality type. I had to intervene and tell him that if you base your actions and decisions around what your personality type is then you will be at the antipodal point of the reason for the Myers-Briggs system. In other words, you should use your personality profile as a tool to help you understand and accept yourself and if you do things because you think it is what your personality type "should" do then you are betraying self which is the antitheses of self understanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,393 Posts
For me, I think it's both. It's nice to be able to relate, but I don't like to be labeled. I just am who I am. I don't believe I should act a certain way because it's the INFP thing to do.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top