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Discussion Starter #3
I can be. I'd think this could be especially true of INFP's who are Enneagram 9's.

I sometimes wonder if my laziness is really a passive aggressive approach to a duty or responsibility I'm not thrilled about.
The latter of your statements is definitely why I can get lazy lol. I'm also a type nine.
 

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I get productive in (sometimes very) short spurts. I feel like I could chill out and do almost nothing for months at a time, (oh wait I did that this summer, and am really pissed it's over). I agree with the passive aggressiveness towards things I don't want to do. I think INFPs are just really good at becoming content with really shitty situations so most of the time aren't motivated for greatness. I forgot how much I hated school...
 

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Laziness can be a behavioral manifestation of the subconscious processes which govern an INFP's thinking, yes. But it isn't a trait that necessarily appears in every INFP.

It can be changed when the INFP can be convinced (either by others or by him/herself) that it is important for him/her to get off their lazy ass and do something.

I'm still in the process of convincing myself, btw.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Laziness can be a behavioral manifestation of the subconscious processes which govern an INFP's thinking, yes. But it isn't a trait that necessarily appears in every INFP.

It can be changed when the INFP can be convinced (either by others or by him/herself) that it is important for him/her to get off their lazy ass and do something.

I'm still in the process of convincing myself, btw.
cool. i guess subconsciously we know we shouldn't have to be going through the motions over and over and over again. i kinda like that we are so mellow.

haha yeah the attempted convincing (from someone else unto me) can often times push me further from wanting to do it.
basically i just make up fake, usually superstitious, reasons as to why i HAVE to do something, and that always seems to work.
 

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This is all completely me. Just about every teacher I've ever had since late middle school has told me that I'm brilliant, but horribly unmotivated...
When I get my grades, it's all 112% and 0%s. When I'm really into something, I'll blow it out of the water. When I'm not, it either not going to get done or be done half-assed at the last minute.

Also, the line "I think INFPs are just really good at becoming content with really shitty situations" is PERFECT.
 

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I'm lazy and type 9 xD
I sort of agree with the post that said that its more passive-agressiveness towards working x.X

I just don't like to do what I don't like to do.
 

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I am lazy or lazy with an agenda. I also rationalize things that need to be done to point where I determine that that task it isn't that imperative\important. The flip side is, I feel I should to be doing something to be productive.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It depends on what constitutes lazy.

I work incredibly hard at things I see a point in, or things that absolutely must be completed. Otherwise, I could care less. But I don't know if that really constitutes lazy. :laughing:
hmm i dont personally think that counts as lazy ;)
 

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I find myself to be highly unmotivated 90% of the time the other 10%, I move in overdrive. Case and point I put off an 8 page term paper till 4 hours before the class it was due (finished it too).
 

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Actually I don't see laziness as a trait, but rather a behaviour. So I would say no, laziness is not an "INFP trait", insofar that it isn't "inherent" to the INFP's, or indeed any person's, being.
I think it's potentially damaging for people to define themselves by negative behaviours. I'm not saying it's inherently negative to sometimes choose relaxing and having a good time instead of "just going through the motions" every frickin' day or hour. But the behaviour that people refer to here (and that I'm all too familiar with), namely the "passive-aggressiveness towards working", I would say is indeed a negative behaviour. You're putting off a task that you know needs to be completed, so there you are, doing things which you can't fully enjoy because there's that nagging feeling you still have to complete the task at hand. You can try to suppress that nagging feeling and just do whatever you want, but ultimately it's going to bite you in the ass, unleashing a lot of negativity and whatnot.
When you start to identify with laziness, or other characteristics that are perceived as "negative", then it becomes difficult to deal with them because they're "part of you", and changing them implies you have to change the very core of your being.

That's another difficult and interesting question. Which traits are part of yourself and which other traits are disposable, can be changed without changing your core? This always fascinated me. What is someone's core? Does that even exist? Of course there's your genetic makeup, which imposes certain limits in which you can develop, and which maybe limit what you can become (although with increasing technology, these limits are becoming vaguer by the day). Then there's a little thing called neuroplasticity: oh, what wonderfully malleable brains we possess!

But before I stray too much off-topic, let me get to the point and finish the goddamn post. I think we all have, at least a "vague" idea of what makes us happy, or of what would make us happy. I also think that deep down, we know when we are wasting our time. Not from the perspective of society, but from our OWN perspective. Blundering about in a field collecting clovers may be perceived by most of the outside world as an outright waste of time, but if it truly makes you happy and you derive a true sense of fulfillment out of it, then you shouldn't fret.
However, sometimes there are mundane things which just seem to get in the way of our lofty dreams and visions... but we know that they have to be done, "or bad things will happen". Then it'll seem tempting to put off this task and sort of deny its existence for a while... but by doing this instead of confronting the task and relaxing and rewarding ourselves afterwards, we are wasting time. For example, I always had the habit of starting late on my homework, because the stress acted as a sort of "motor" to get it done. My results didn't suffer, I could do what I want, and I felt content, so there was no need to change this behaviour. In my first few years at university, the same strategy didn't work, I felt anxious and unfulfilled, both in my private as well as my academic life.
This is when we should look at 1) what makes us happy and 2) what needs to be done, and evaluate if what we are doing is conducive to both, or neither, and change our behaviour accordingly.
 

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Actually I don't see laziness as a trait, but rather a behaviour. So I would say no, laziness is not an "INFP trait", insofar that it isn't "inherent" to the INFP's, or indeed any person's, being.
I think it's potentially damaging for people to define themselves by negative behaviours. I'm not saying it's inherently negative to sometimes choose relaxing and having a good time instead of "just going through the motions" every frickin' day or hour. But the behaviour that people refer to here (and that I'm all too familiar with), namely the "passive-aggressiveness towards working", I would say is indeed a negative behaviour. You're putting off a task that you know needs to be completed, so there you are, doing things which you can't fully enjoy because there's that nagging feeling you still have to complete the task at hand. You can try to suppress that nagging feeling and just do whatever you want, but ultimately it's going to bite you in the ass, unleashing a lot of negativity and whatnot.
When you start to identify with laziness, or other characteristics that are perceived as "negative", then it becomes difficult to deal with them because they're "part of you", and changing them implies you have to change the very core of your being.

That's another difficult and interesting question. Which traits are part of yourself and which other traits are disposable, can be changed without changing your core? This always fascinated me. What is someone's core? Does that even exist? Of course there's your genetic makeup, which imposes certain limits in which you can develop, and which maybe limit what you can become (although with increasing technology, these limits are becoming vaguer by the day). Then there's a little thing called neuroplasticity: oh, what wonderfully malleable brains we possess!

But before I stray too much off-topic, let me get to the point and finish the goddamn post. I think we all have, at least a "vague" idea of what makes us happy, or of what would make us happy. I also think that deep down, we know when we are wasting our time. Not from the perspective of society, but from our OWN perspective. Blundering about in a field collecting clovers may be perceived by most of the outside world as an outright waste of time, but if it truly makes you happy and you derive a true sense of fulfillment out of it, then you shouldn't fret.
However, sometimes there are mundane things which just seem to get in the way of our lofty dreams and visions... but we know that they have to be done, "or bad things will happen". Then it'll seem tempting to put off this task and sort of deny its existence for a while... but by doing this instead of confronting the task and relaxing and rewarding ourselves afterwards, we are wasting time. For example, I always had the habit of starting late on my homework, because the stress acted as a sort of "motor" to get it done. My results didn't suffer, I could do what I want, and I felt content, so there was no need to change this behaviour. In my first few years at university, the same strategy didn't work, I felt anxious and unfulfilled, both in my private as well as my academic life.
This is when we should look at 1) what makes us happy and 2) what needs to be done, and evaluate if what we are doing is conducive to both, or neither, and change our behaviour accordingly.
of all responses here, I like this the most.

this is why there's a term called "developing your functions" , or "work on your weakness".
Never let the weakness be there forever because "that is just me (or MY type)" or whatever.
like INFPwn said very well above, always always be honest with yourself if 1) that weakness makes your life unfulfilled or unhappy or even depressed or feeling useless, and 2) then examine what needs to be done, or fixed, in this case.

We all need to grow. because that's what Life is all about: CHANGE.

Otherwise, then we all won't be able to see this wonderful Myers-Briggs (MBTI) inventory comes into Reality, because the inventor (Isabelle and Katharine, which I've read they're both also INFPs) would easily just say "oh I can't finish this thing, because I'm an INFP, and I'm just naturally lazy! tee-hee...oh well!"

to come into full-happiness, we all need to unleash our full-potentials, and to grow to become our fullest, well-rounded individual.
No excuse. No easy way out. "no pain no (Real) gain"
 
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im not lazy I just have a very active imagination that I choose to exercise regularly:tongue:
 

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I can be lazy. Sometimes I do work really hard (and can almost be a workaholic), but it has to be for something I really care about. If it's just getting things done that I don't really care about, I can be lazy and procrastinate a lot.
 
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