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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I recently got a test back from one of my professors that I did not do so well on. However, some of the questions did not seem as though they were objective enough to be asked. For example, one question asks about what teaching strategy will most likely be useful, while another asks which teacher will probably engage students the least. I found these questions irritating because the moment you start asking hypothetical questions such as the ones above, they lose their objectivity because they become situational and therefore cannot have only one correct answer. While I don't think these questions are completely unfair since some of what was asked appeared in prior readings, I still view them as case-by-case rather than purely objective, and they therefore should have been altered or not asked at all.

Anyway, the reason I bring this example up is because I believe it could be an example of a Te/Ti difference. As an INFP, Te is my inferior function, while I believe the professor mentioned above is an INFJ (Ti tertiary). In a lot of ways, I can find myself relating to Ti in that it's very independent and likes finding its own answers, but if the above example entails Ti logic, then I can see why I'm not supposed to relate to it. I want to see what you all think, though.
 

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Well, a medium solution would have just been to say which strategy meets the criteria overall(in most dominant paradigm instances), while providing caveats for situations where it would not work. Is this not objective?
 

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Questions that spring to mind: "What's the most common learning style? Do most people learn by doing, seeing, or reading?" To me, the question acknowledges that a single strategy won't reach every student. It simply asks which strategy is broad or accessible enough to reach most students, or which strategy works best for that particular subject. Generalize. Same with the second question. What kind of classes or subjects encourage active participation, such as exchanging opinions or public speaking? Or if it's a matter of a professor's teaching strategy, which strategy is more passive than active?

Or something like that.
 

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So I recently got a test back from one of my professors that I did not do so well on. However, some of the questions did not seem as though they were objective enough to be asked. For example, one question asks about what teaching strategy will most likely be useful, while another asks which teacher will probably engage students the least. I found these questions irritating because the moment you start asking hypothetical questions such as the ones above, they lose their objectivity because they become situational and therefore cannot have only one correct answer.
Thing is, if you are presented with the situations, then, questions related to the situations are relatively objective. There is no grounds for your complaint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Well, a medium solution would have just been to say which strategy meets the criteria overall(in most dominant paradigm instances), while providing caveats for situations where it would not work. Is this not objective?
Well the problem with that is that the questions I mentioned were multiple-choice, so there wasn't really any room for me to go into explanations about my answers.

Questions that spring to mind: "What's the most common learning style? Do most people learn by doing, seeing, or reading?" To me, the question acknowledges that a single strategy won't reach every student. It simply asks which strategy is broad or accessible enough to reach most students, or which strategy works best for that particular subject. Generalize. Same with the second question. What kind of classes or subjects encourage active participation, such as exchanging opinions or public speaking? Or if it's a matter of a professor's teaching strategy, which strategy is more passive than active?

Or something like that.
Yeah, good point. I think where I ultimately got hung up is that most, if not all, of the answers could be correct depending on who the students are as well as what needs they have. I definitely see your point, though.

Thing is, if you are presented with the situations, then, questions related to the situations are relatively objective. There is no grounds for your complaint.
What do you mean by the first part? Also, I don't really think I'm complaining - it's not like I'm going to go petition for extra credit because I didn't think the questions were completely fair, and I do acknowledge that I should have prepared better. All I'm asking in this thread is if the situation I mentioned is an example of a Te-Ti difference since, when I'm being tested, I view any multiple-choice question that isn't 100% objective as flaky and open to interpretation.
 

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Yeah, good point. I think where I ultimately got hung up is that most, if not all, of the answers could be correct depending on who the students are as well as what needs they have. I definitely see your point, though.
You're over-thinking it.
 

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The lack of room for explaining the answers you give in a multiple-choice test is always going to be problematic with questions such as these - and yes, they do seem insufficiently objective, or at least insufficiently defined. Of course, this is dependent on what the options provided were, what means of determining the quality of teaching methods have been covered during the course, &c., which could change the degree to which the fault lies with the test structure and/or the question itself. But certainly, as you've presented it, it seems to be to lack objectivity, and to be too situational to give a broad and all-encompassing response to.

[...]when I'm being tested, I view any multiple-choice question that isn't 100% objective as flaky and open to interpretation.
I could certainly concur with this, and I definitely think part of the problem here is multiple-choice testing in general, since it either lacks the requisite objectivity (as you've raised), or, if it is objective, I would argue there's often more to be gained from testing how people get to their answers than what answers they get anyway.

I wouldn't think this is likely to be strongly related to any facet of personality at all, but just to raise the possibility: Ne/Ni, perhaps? Just in the way you're framing this issue, it seems like it could be - seeing one answer as the most right vs. struggling to distinguish between what each seem, situationally, like potentially plausible responses. And you did say you suspect the professor is an INFJ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The lack of room for explaining the answers you give in a multiple-choice test is always going to be problematic with questions such as these - and yes, they do seem insufficiently objective, or at least insufficiently defined. Of course, this is dependent on what the options provided were, what means of determining the quality of teaching methods have been covered during the course, &c., which could change the degree to which the fault lies with the test structure and/or the question itself. But certainly, as you've presented it, it seems to be to lack objectivity, and to be too situational to give a broad and all-encompassing response to.



I could certainly concur with this, and I definitely think part of the problem here is multiple-choice testing in general, since it either lacks the requisite objectivity (as you've raised), or, if it is objective, I would argue there's often more to be gained from testing how people get to their answers than what answers they get anyway.

I wouldn't think this is likely to be strongly related to any facet of personality at all, but just to raise the possibility: Ne/Ni, perhaps? Just in the way you're framing this issue, it seems like it could be - seeing one answer as the most right vs. struggling to distinguish between what each seem, situationally, like potentially plausible responses. And you did say you suspect the professor is an INFJ...
Interesting... I hadn't really considered Ne vs. Ni (and looking back on it, I really don't know why). That definitely makes more sense than Te vs. Ti...
 

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Interesting... I hadn't really considered Ne vs. Ni (and looking back on it, I really don't know why). That definitely makes more sense than Te vs. Ti...
I also use auxiliary Ne and I have zero problem with multiple choice tests where the questions ask for the most likely/probably correct answer or course of action. I don't think what you're describing is an Ne thing, because not all Ne-doms that I know are like that. My SO is totally, spastically ENTP. All over the place. But he has no problem identifying "correct" answers under given parameters.

You are very much overthinking this, and it does sound like inferior extraverted thinking to me. You have a preoccupation with objectivity that actually presents as pedantic but is clearly entrenched in subjective judging (Fi). Similar to the way Ti-Ne can be pedantic, but Ti-Ne is pedantic about enforcing what you're questioning the validity of--"commonly agreed upon truths" (things like grammar, phrasing, facts). Probably due to inferior Fe.
 

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No it's more like an Si vs Ni difference.

Si: I don't want to speculate; it depends on the circumstances.
Ne: They all seem like equally plausible choices.
Ni: Teacher A, duh.

You are very much overthinking this, and it does sound like inferior extraverted thinking to me. You have a preoccupation with objectivity that actually presents as pedantic but is clearly entrenched in subjective judging (Fi). Similar to the way Ti-Ne can be pedantic, but Ti-Ne is pedantic about enforcing what you're questioning the validity of--"commonly agreed upon truths" (things like grammar, phrasing, facts). Probably due to inferior Fe.
Commonly agreed upon truths or values are Je.

Ji is subjective truths or values. Definitely not commonly-agreed-upon.


Te: There is absolutely no evidence that shows that vaccines are unsafe. (commonly agreed upon truth).
Ti: Ya but but but but fight the power! Stick it to the man! Don't vax your kids!
 
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