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I used to think I was an ENFP who only seemed like an INTP because I was friends with an ISTP in grade school and I tried to be like her, but now I think I'm actually an INTP.
 

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@Melchiz, if we are to accept that there is correlation between type and brain structure (i.e. INFPs have a bigger/more active amygdala) then yes there is a chance that we are born with our type. The way the brain forms inside the womb can differ in various ways from person to person. A different placental connection can mean a great deal for the formation of the different parts of the brain.

But this is nothing more than a predisposition for the personality of the person. Enviromental factors play a determinant role in the eventual type that a person will have.

It is quite rare if not impossible to find two people raised in the same enviroment having the same personality. This is proof of a very early formation of type.

Additionally, even brain workout can turn a function upside down. Neuroplasticity is a very important factor in one's personality traits.

Hope this helped.
 

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Well, if type is formed by external circumstances, then I would imagine I'd be an xSFJ. ESFJ is supposed to be the most favored personality type for women in the US, and I'm the polar opposite. I'm a female INTP who clashes with her environment big time. My traits are definitely not favored.
 

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I think if my family had had their way, I would have been some sort of ISxJ. But nope. They got an INFP. How, I don't know. But they sure didn't make me that way.
 

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What do biologists say about the male/female ratio being somewhat even instead of being tilted toward one or the other? At first I wanted to say types were random but that doesn't explain why SJ's are the most common type (which is as it should be).

Look at this chart. SJ's are by far the most common.
 

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This is something i've also wondered about. I think that it's a mixture of both. I'm an istp but i believe i was heavily influenced by my older best friend. I think growing up i tried emulating him to a degree.he got me into a lot of my current interests. I also believe that everyone has a natural disposition as well. however, whether that disposition is also influenced by early childhood experiences, environmental factors, and other things is beyond me. so who really know
 

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Cosmic Yeti
I'm of the very strong opinion that it is genetically mapped to a bias but alterable with trauma in early development. I made a very popular post related to this subject here. Have a read and tell me what you think.
 

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It is inborn.

Siblings experience the same upbringing and situations but some are extroverts, some are introverts.


Place a young child in school. One sibling needs to study for hours to get an A, and the other picks it up the first time it's taught and gets an A without studying.

This shows there is something in their brain wiring that they were born with.

Babies at a few months old show a personality. Some cry when their parent is gone, some are quiet. Some seek out novelty and toys, others are content just daydreaming.

The DNA contributes to the psyche temperament.
 

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I think we're all born with certain inherent traits, but our types are determined by the interplay between those traits and what the world throws at us. I've personally found that a disproportionate number of girls I'm friends with have the same type or a type one letter away from their mothers.

My parents say that even as an infant, I seemed "unimpressed by and suspicious of the ability of adults to take care of me". I was a quiet and "negative" baby, until I learned how to talk. Then everything just came spilling forward, and everyone became immediately aware that I had an enormous imagination and a bubbly, contrarian personality. I was also more content to play with imaginary friends instead of real ones.
When my earliest teachers tried to correct something I was doing wrong, I would "glare menacingly" at them and refuse to change my ways. If my teachers told me "you're going to have to learn how to do this the right way sooner or later, because you can't keep this up forever" I would purposely reject the entire concept of the thing and find clever ways around the problems caused by my consistent, purposeful failure to use proper methods.
For this reason, I never learned how to hold my pencil correctly and have to put duct tape over the callouses and dents in my fingers after prolonged use. Same with holding my cello bow correctly. And reading sheet music-- I never learned to read music because I thought my piano teacher was "bossy."

And in that respect, I don't think I've changed all that much. Sometimes I don't follow rules just because I don't like the people making them, and nine times out of ten if someone tells me "you're doing it wrong" I'm going to keep doing it that way on purpose, specifically because I don't like being told how to do things. And what's more, I make an effort to learn how to do that wrong thing as well as I can. I never learned how to read sheet music, but I can play anything by ear and I'm the leader and composer for my campus musical improv group. I've written a symphony and recorded songs, and maybe I don't hold my bow properly but the way I do it puts more natural pressure on the string anyways, which means I can rock out harder.

Some INFP traits I developed. I don't think I was always a Feeler. I think that was a choice I made early on, or maybe it was just a product of my influences. I had a little sister with some trauma and subsequent processing problems early in life, and I was her only friend for a long time, because I was the only one who understood her (she communicated by meowing mostly). My best friend in first grade was an emotional tornado, and so I learned to deal with her ups and downs, as well as how to mirror her energy. My mom taught me that it's more important to be kind than to be tough, and she also taught me how to be tough in defense of those who deserve more kindness than they get.

So I think it's a combination of nurture and nature, really.
 

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Cosmic Yeti
I'm of the very strong opinion that it is genetically mapped to a bias but alterable with trauma in early development. I made a very popular post related to this subject here. Have a read and tell me what you think.
Netfences, I agree with most of what you say in your post especially about how environmental conditioning and repeatable learned behaviors can affect predisposition. I'm not sure why you chose to pair 'core functions' closer to the brain stem (the base of motor and sensory systems) and the 'built upon functions' with higher brain activity.

If by 'closer to the brainstem' you're refering to the thalamus, the cerebellum or the pituitary gland, again it would be a stretch to pair these areas with functions, never mind core functions. Keep in mind that some of those core functions like the executive ones (including thinking functions,) are found in the neocortex (far away from the brain stem) and more specifically in the prefrontal cortex.

Nevertheless, the gist of your post is very interesting and I totally agree with it.
 

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The core type would appear to be present. Further refinements come through experience, environment, and/or continued cognitive development.
 

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CosmicYeti said:
I'm not sure why you chose to pair 'core functions' closer to the brain stem (the base of motor and sensory systems) and the 'built upon functions' with higher brain activity.
Because the core functions take place in the cerebellum and the higher order cognitive thoughts are referenced later in the larger (ie: later developed) brain. The larger brain does have the ability to overrule the primal function which is a good thing for society but the root/first impulse is your MBTI. The best way to think of your MBTI is as your computer firmware. Two different computers with different firmware can both run the same application software and so will appear identical until you start stripping away the installed software. The closer you get to the basic input/output system, the more evident become those root differences. The citations you seek are in the submission process but they are drawn from the biological experiments on the electro-chemical brain function mapping experiments being done today.
Cat Enthusiast said:
Type is shaped by little influences everywhere.
No, fully developed personalities are but not MBTI type. MBTI seems to follow a more physiological map.
 

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Because the core functions take place in the cerebellum and the higher order cognitive thoughts are referenced later in the larger (ie: later developed) brain.
Could you provide citations for this?
 
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