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When I was taking the test, there were some questions that I weren't sure how to answer. Some of the questions were like ''a logical decision is the best, when it hurts someone's feelings.'' I'm wasn't sure if it was asking whether I believe that or if it were my actions that show that. I do usually believe in logical decisions over feelings, however, I often find myself sympathetically sparing others in spite of that belief. So, I'm a bit confused. :th_blush:
 

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All of the items on the official MBTI test got there by a process of elimination that started decades ago and has involved hundreds of tested items, with the survivors being items that have been found to cluster, to a substantial degree — based on thousands of tests and the statistical standards applicable in the personality typology field — with the other items being scored for the same preference.

And it's maybe also worth noting that it's a common mistake — but a mistake nonetheless — to think there's something wrong with a two-choice personality test item if either both answers appeal to you (so you want to say, "Both, please!") or both answers seem too extreme or otherwise don't fit you. In those cases, you're supposed to do your best to pick the option that seems like the best fit (in the first case) or the least poor fit (in the second). They don't call that kind of test "forced choice" for nothing.

Again, the items on the official MBTI are selected based on their proven statistical tendency (based on thousands of tests) to separate, e.g., S's from N's when the test-taker is forced to choose one response or the other. And that's not to say that any particular item is likely to be chosen by anything like 90% or more of the appropriate type.

The MBTI Manual expressly acknowledges that, in many cases, both sides of a particular item are likely to have some appeal to any particular test-taker, and also that, in many cases, the alternative choices don't exactly make sense in terms of a logical opposition. As the Manual explains:

MBTI Manual said:
In writing items, every effort was made to make the responses appeal to the appropriate types, for example, to make the perceptive response to a JP item as attractive to P people as the judging response is to J people. The result is that responses may be psychologically rather than logically opposed, a fact that annoys many thinking types. Item content is less important than that the words and form of the sentence should serve as a "stimulus to evoke a type response."
I often describe the MBTI preferences — at least in terms of many of their aspects — as "temperament tugs." In cases where you're conflicted and one side of the conflict is more the "gut level" or "natural inclination" you and the other side is a more rational/calculating side of you that, to some degree, wants to rein in (or thinks you should rein in) your more natural inclinations for the sake of external results or for any other reason, your MBTI preference is more likely to correspond to the "natural inclination." In describing the right frame of mind for taking the official MBTI, the MBTI Manual explains:

MBTI Manual said:
Some people have trouble finding the correct frame of mind for answering the MBTI. When reporting the results to some people, they say they reported their "work self," "school self," "ideal self," or some other self they now consider atypical. The frame of reference desired in respondents is what has been termed the "shoes-off self." The "shoes-off self" fosters an attitude in which one functions naturally, smoothly, and effortlessly, and in which one is not going "against one's grain." The function of the MBTI is to provide the first step toward understanding one's natural preferences.
 
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