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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Most people probably don't think that commonly seen traits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are very similar to those of an ISFJ.

However, the description fits me to a T - especially the range of jobs (they are all ones I've either wanted to hold at some point in my life or have held). I am a social worker. As a child and teen I dreamed of being a doctor, and have previously worked in customer service/health administration as an adult.

I am a 30 year old married female who was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome at age 25. While I had received various mental health diagnoses and was on medication from the age of 14 on, I didn't find out what was really up until I got my diagnosis.

Here's the irony: I obtained a Master of Social Work due to my interest in social justice and political activism. I graduated in 2010 and was unemployed/severely underemployed (very part time retail) for 13 months. The diagnosis came about as a result of a worsening mental health issues during that time. Part of the goal of my diagnosis was to help me find out more about what I could do as a career since social work wasn't working out. However if you are familiar with ASD then you probably know that its defining characteristic is perceived by many to be a marked lack of empathy - so I began to look for completely different types of jobs (courtroom stenographer was one I seriously considered) while feeling bad about not being able to "use" my credentials.

During that time through my fiancé (it's always a connection!) I got a job as a receptionist in an agency that provides therapy to children with disabilities such as ASD. In the over a year since I got there, I have been able to start receiving therapy and am seeing several specialists for my medications and the health issues that followed me from that dark time of unemployment, trauma from a year and a half spent working for a horrifically abusive dentist boss and years of improperly treated mental health issues. This has enabled me to be promoted to a role performing initial assessment and intake for families seeking services at our clinic - I excel at it, am inspired every day, have great working relationships with colleagues and I am finally "using" my education.

This post is starting to feel self-absorbed, so I will stop now.

Please share your thoughts on ISFJs and Autism :)
 

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I thinks it's really cool you were able to find a place that fit you, and that also let you use your social work knowledge. I don't think that aspergers is related to any specific type, however I have noticed correlations on occasion. Like my bad habit of taking things very literally, or thinking in an overly concrete fashion. Anyway I'm so glad you were able to find a great job. Congratulations! :)
 

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I've read many people refer to themselves as HSP (Highly Sensitive Person) who are also ISFJ, and that would correlate with heightened sensitivity to sensory stimulus in Autism.

It may just be a sharing of a handful of genes that affect particular systems in the body /brain. I've my own interpretation of the influences and causes from what I've learned, but especially in women it's a combination of estrogens, and different types of folate, being out of balance, and very likely casein (a milk protein) blocking cerebral folate receptors, impacting social behavior. There are several studies of that if you want to casually look them up.

There are ISFJ who are very aware of social cues (A greeting and an introduction? Oh, I'll greet you back, make a gesture like a hand wave, and say my name, and ask you how you are) whereas my own brain goes kinda silent. I acknowledge what just happened, but my mind isn't automatically returning the social behavior. I forget to. I forget to nearly entirely. I may say, "Hi." but there's no other follow through. I actually have to mentally prepare to say those things like a "normal" person in the minutes before, or I likely miss the window. I once believed that I don't miss social cues, but I do. Fairly regularly. My mind has priority on other things.

I don't think it's a leap to say that my mind is consciously and unconsciously processing them differently- not better or worse, just different.
 
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