Personality Cafe banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
ISFP Learning Style

ISFPs learn best by experiencing, doing and memorising, and they are interested in the practical use to which they can put ideas. They collect facts and are good at storing and retrieving information, which can be of enormous benefit in the right circumstances.

New experiences excite ISFPs and as a consequence they tend to plunge in to subjects, learning as they go. Their interest is maintained by variety, sensory stimulation and active participation, and thus they benefit from short presentations, ’on-the-job’ training that has immediate applications, and practical, experiential workshops. Demonstrations and practical examples are of more use to ISFPs than theory, discussion or reading.



As learners, ISFPs:

- are more interested in facts than abstract theories

- prefer loose, unstructured teaching

- enjoy personal involvement and participation

- enjoy multi-sensory teaching (computers, audio, visuals etc.)

- prefer frequent breaks that allow for physical movement

- benefit from developing judgement, criticism and objectivity

- respond to hands-on training, demonstrations and real-world examples



ISFPs are most comfortable learning when:

- engrossed in short 'here and now' activities such as competitive teamwork tasks

- engaged in a wide range of diverse activities

- allowed or encouraged to watch/think/check over activities

- able to stand back from events and listen or observe

- allowed to think before acting, to assimilate before commenting, e.g. time to prepare, a chance to read in advance a brief giving background data

- they can reach a decision in their own time without pressure and tight deadlines

- there is an obvious link between the subject matter and a problem or opportunity on the job

- shown techniques for doing things with obvious practical advantages e.g. how to save time, how to make a good first impression, how to deal with awkward people

- they can try out and practise techniques with coaching and feedback

- given techniques currently applicable to their own jobs

- given immediate opportunities to implement what they have learned

- they can concentrate on practical issues, e.g. drawing up action plans with an obvious end product, suggesting short cuts, giving tips



ISFPs are least comfortable when:

- the learning is not related to an immediate need they recognise or they cannot see an immediate relevance or practical benefit

- the organisers of the learning, or the event itself, seem distant from reality, all theory and general principles

- there is no practice or no clear guidelines on how to do something

- forced into the limelight, e.g. to act as leader/chairman, or to role-play in front of on-lookers

Source: ISFP Learning Profile
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
IDK about memorization and loose, unstructured teaching methods.

...but I suppose both of these things work all right for me so long as they deal with facts or a tangible subject.

I had a very abstract psychology teacher once who was ridiculously unstructured. I did really well in the class, because I read and studied a lot outside of class and understood the topics well. But in class, I always felt so lost. I was on the verge of an anxiety attack most days in there and left to use the restroom quite often. Sometimes structure helps me to make things more tangible... I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Psh =_= In English, there's a group of us who didn't usually participate. And once the teacher said something along the lines of,"You know, In some colleges, you can pay to just sit and listen. Unfortunately, that's not the option here." So embarrassing. :/ I do your assignments well and hand them in on time, what more do you want from me?! :( Let everyone else talk, I have more fun listening to them.

I wish. ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
ISFPs are least comfortable when:

- the learning is not related to an immediate need they recognise or they cannot see an immediate relevance or practical benefit

- the organisers of the learning, or the event itself, seem distant from reality, all theory and general principles

- there is no practice or no clear guidelines on how to do something

- forced into the limelight, e.g. to act as leader/chairman, or to role-play in front of on-lookers
oh, my goodness, YES! I am having trouble with these two in my classes now!!!! exactly, positively, absolutely. it is so agitating!!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: gracemontez

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,606 Posts
I wish I had more hands-on learning. I am really good at it. I like books from time to time, but usually of facts and incredible topics like certain sciences (biology, anatomy) or art. I am quite practical, and I do like immediate results. (I do love my Brit lit, however...)



Algebra? Algebra? In case I decide to become an engineer? Wtf?????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Yes. These were spot on. Especially:

the learning is not related to an immediate need they recognise or they cannot see an immediate relevance or practical benefit
I knew I have no interest on things that I feel I can't apply in the real world. I hated calculus and stuff, but I enjoyed programming. I thought I was just lazy, but turns out it's common for ISFP's.

ISFPs learn best by experiencing, doing and memorising, and they are interested in the practical use to which they can put ideas. Demonstrations and practical examples are of more use to ISFPs than theory, discussion or reading.
This is definitely true. Experience is a must, without that, I easily forget what I learn. Memorising related to the experience, contrary for memorising related to reading / text. That's why I'm lousy at remembering quotes or theories unless very famous or hears it a lot. I usually remember the context, but not the exact words.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top