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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to know, what are you guys doing for living and do enjoy it.

Recently Im thinking about things that I would like to do and how mush I found my job boring and exhaustive + Plus I'm studying finance :D I could use some experiences
 

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I was about to make a thread asking ISFP's what sort of career/job paths they chose and what suggestions they had for other confused/lost ISFP's still finding their way. I sure hope this gets a lot responses - come on, guys!
 

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I've dabbled in quite a few areas, ranging from music to psychology to web design. Right now I'm finishing up my IT degree and working in that field for my job. Helping other people satisfies my Fi, and the technical work sharpens my Te. I won't say it's the easiest field for an ISFP to be in because my job is pretty structured and I have to work at being structured. But I do like it more than say, banking. Blech.

I would suggest for you to explore your passions and go from there. What career can you make from your passion? Without some form of outlet for your Fi, it's easy to get caught in a negative Te train of thinking and feel dead inside.
 

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Also, look for jobs that give you autonomy, time to be alone to recharge introvert batteries, and looser structure. That will make you happier.
 
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I won't say it's the easiest field for an ISFP to be in because my job is pretty structured and I have to work at being structured.
This is how I feel about my career. I work as a developer/programmer building web applications and desktop programs and I do spend effort to conform and be structured. We are going to be growing in size and I will have to spend more time developing programming styles that I'm not familiar with and we will be having more communication that pits my thinking style against those that are more structured in their thinking.

What I love though, is I was fortunate to get on with a company that values my contributions and I have space to myself and where I don't have too many distractions. I can plug some headphones into my iPhone and listen to music or podcasts and recharge my batteries.

I agree that it helps to think about what you're passionate about. I do like my job, but sometimes, I think about things I might be more passionate about. For instance, I would like to help people eat better with more nutritious foods. That's quite a departure from programming, but thinking about those things helps define who I am and what I value. And by spending the time to look at my passions it gives me an opportunity to explore the possibilities should I decide it's time to switch careers.

It also helps to spend time thinking about what your current position gives you. Do the pros outweigh the negatives? Like I said, I like my job and for me currently I am paid reasonably well and has allowed me to save a lot for retirement and spend money on hobbies I enjoy like mountain biking, which those bikes aren't cheap!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for Your post. Yeah, I eat clean as well, I go to the gym, so it's my lifestyle for more than a year now and it's making me fell much more comfortable. I really enjoy it.
Some time ago I wanted to become a dietician, but there was a lot of chemistry in it, so I thought - that's not really my thing.
 

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I'm an undergrad microbiology major, studying in prerequisite to biomedical engineering or working in biochemistry. I work with a lot of xNTPs and I generally find the lab environment to be stimulating and independent enough where I can rely solely on my own creativity and problem-solving, conduct experiments and testing, and not have to worry about interacting much with others except for lab partners in contexts of group experiments or working for a lab itself.

I imagine there are quite a few SPs in the science field, but chemistry/biochem seems to attract more NTs and I don't really mind working with them at all - they're innovative people. I was overwhelmed at first when it came to my major because I'm not a very mathematical-oriented person, and struggled when it came to keeping up with classwork and memorising, but I've found my niche and I love the work I do. Had I didn't have a passion in science, I wouldn't be pursuing it. I'm lucky enough to be enthusiastic about microbiology and molecular biology and my GPA is 3.9 for my upper division microbiology class while I get around 3.1s in freshman Physics because I don't particularly enjoy it.

I say choose a major or work where you care about the community and outcomes of that field, and where you have the skills to outcompete people, or at least are passionate about enough to continuously do well. For example, I was contemplating whether or not to pursue art as a career but decided not to because I couldn't afford it, I didn't like working much with my hands and found long amounts of completed labor gratifying and I don't really enjoy freelance work or working for other people's visions. It's not like I'm not passionate about art, but at the same time it's not illegal to not make a career out of it. It's fine to be a great hobbyist. Feasibly you could be a good student and not care about your major, or be a decent employee but not care much or have much passion about your field or work but it's just a lot harder.
 

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I'm studying general business in school...but working in retail right now to pay the bills! I actually love it, and would be perfectly content supervising or in a managerial position at my job, if they would give me the chance once I'm there long enough. However, I'm also doing my own on-the-side business, and would love to get that really up and running one day!

How do you like finance? Is that what you think is boring and exhaustive?
 

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I'm freelancing as Interior Design Consultant.

Freelancing gives me freedom as much as I want. No more monotonous work hours. I'm being the boss of myself.
And being interior design consultant means that I live and play with art, which I love.
Being ISFP means that I need to do something that is more than a job. I need to have passion in it.

I think this profession suits me just fine :kitteh:
 
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